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Bridging gaps in everyday life - a free-listing approach to explore the variety of activities performed by physiotherapists in specialized palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295174
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-29-2018
Author
U Olsson Möller
K Stigmar
I Beck
M Malmström
B H Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Palliative Care, Lund University and Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden. ulrika.olsson_moller@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2018 Jan 29; 17(1):20
Date
Jan-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - manpower - methods
Physical Therapists - standards - trends
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
A growing body of studies indicate benefits of physiotherapy for patients in palliative care, for symptom relief and wellbeing. Though physiotherapists are increasingly acknowledged as important members of palliative care teams, they are still an underutilized source and not fully recognized. The aim of this study was to explore the variety of activities described by physiotherapists in addressing the needs and problems of patients and their families in specialized palliative care settings.
Using a free-listing approach, ten physiotherapists working in eight specialized palliative care settings in Sweden described as precisely and in as much detail as possible different activities in which patients and their families were included (directly or indirectly) during 10 days. The statements were entered into NVivo and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Statements containing more than one activity were categorized per activity.
In total, 264 statements, containing 504 varied activities, were coded into seven categories: Counteracting a declining physical function; Informing, guiding and educating; Observing, assessing and evaluating; Attending to signs and symptoms; Listening, talking with and understanding; Caring for basic needs; and Organizing, planning and coordinating. In practice, however, the activities were intrinsically interwoven. The activities showed how physiotherapists aimed, through care for the body, to address patients' physical, psychological, social and existential needs, counteracting the decline in a patient's physical function and wellbeing. The activities also revealed a great variation, in relation not only to what they did, but also to their holistic and inseparable nature with regard to why, how, when, where, with whom and for whom the activities were carried out, which points towards a well-adopted person-centred palliative care approach.
The study provides hands-on descriptions of how person-centred palliative care is integrated in physiotherapists' everyday activities. Physiotherapists in specialized palliative care help patients and families to bridge the gap between their real and ideal everyday life with the aim to maximize security, autonomy and wellbeing. The concrete examples included can be used in understanding the contribution of physiotherapists to the palliative care team and inform future research interventions and outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29378566 View in PubMed
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Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling: A case-control study: the Copenhagen Stroke Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52444
Source
Stroke. 2000 Sep;31(9):2251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
L P Kammersgaard
B H Rasmussen
H S Jørgensen
J. Reith
U. Weber
T S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark. kammersgaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Stroke. 2000 Sep;31(9):2251-6
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Blood Cell Count
Blood Chemical Analysis
Blood pressure
Body temperature
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrovascular Accident - blood - physiopathology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced - methods
Male
Meperidine - therapeutic use
Neurologic Examination
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Safety
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients with acute stroke. METHODS: We prospectively included 17 patients (cases) with stroke admitted within 12 hours from stoke onset (mean 3.25 hours). They were given hypothermic treatment for 6 hours by the "forced air" method, a surface cooling method that uses a cooling blanket with a flow of cool air (10 degrees C). Pethidine was given to treat compensatory shivering. Cases were compared with 56 patients (controls) from the Copenhagen Stroke Study matched for age, gender, initial stroke severity, body temperature on admission, and time from stroke onset to admission. Blood cytology, biochemistry, ECGs, and body temperature were monitored during hypothermic treatment. Multiple regression analyses on outcome were performed to examine the safety of hypothermic therapy. RESULTS: Body temperature decreased from t(0)=36.8 degrees C to t(6)=35.5 degrees C (P:
PubMed ID
10978060 View in PubMed
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How patients spend their time in a hospice and in an oncological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203832
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Oct;28(4):818-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B H Rasmussen
P O Sandman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Oct;28(4):818-28
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hospices
Humans
Inpatients
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing
Oncology Service, Hospital
Sweden
Time Management
Abstract
This paper presents the findings from a work sampling study. At 10-minute intervals the activities of patients in a hospice, and in an oncological unit were monitored for a day or a night. In total, 5286 observations of patient activities were recorded. The findings showed that being a patient, especially in the oncological unit, was apparently a very lonely experience with limited social interaction and purposeful activity. Hospice patients, in contrast, were less alone, spending much of their time with their relatives. Although none of the patients at either site spent a major part of either day or night with nurses, hospice patients and nurses spent significantly more time together, and their encounters more often lasted longer. Nursing care at both sites was mainly related to 'doing' rather than 'being', i.e. when with patients, nurses most often had some task to accomplish. The study shows the importance of increasing our understanding of the use of time and the combination of doing and being that reflects good nursing care of the dying.
PubMed ID
9829671 View in PubMed
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Nurses' work in a hospice and in an oncological unit in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20194
Source
Hosp J. 2000;15(1):53-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
B H Rasmussen
P O Sandman
Author Affiliation
Department of Advanced Nursing, UmeA University, Sweden. bithon95@student.umu
Source
Hosp J. 2000;15(1):53-75
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Hospices - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Job Description
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Oncologic Nursing - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time and Motion Studies
Workload
Abstract
This paper presents the results of a work-sampling study aimed at describing and comparing the activities of nurses at a free-standing in-patient hospice and a hospital oncological unit. Data suggests that although patient care at both sites is structured by organizational routines, the content and quantity of the nurses' physical and emotional labor differed markedly. Hospice nurses spend significantly more of their working time with patients and/or relatives (37%) than the oncological nurses (21%). When they are with patients the nurses in both settings are most often performing a physical activity such as helping patients with their daily activities in the hospice, and helping patients with needs in relation to investigations and treatment in the oncological unit.
PubMed ID
11033659 View in PubMed
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[Nursing diagnosis--quick shortcuts and necessary documentation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225893
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1991 Aug 7;91(32):16-9, 28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-1991
Author
B H Rasmussen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1991 Aug 7;91(32):16-9, 28
Date
Aug-7-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computers
Denmark
Humans
Nursing Diagnosis
Nursing Records - standards
Patient Care Planning
Quality Assurance, Health Care
PubMed ID
1767420 View in PubMed
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Palliative chemotherapy during the last month of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136185
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Nov;22(11):2375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
U. Näppä
O. Lindqvist
B H Rasmussen
B. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Östersund Hospital, Jämtland County Council, Östersund, Sweden. ulla.nappa@jll.se
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Nov;22(11):2375-80
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial - drug therapy - mortality
Ovarian Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality
Palliative Care - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Care - methods
Abstract
This study analyses the potential discriminative characteristics for patients with incurable cancer who received palliative chemotherapy during their last month of life.
The study includes all patients with epithelial cancer treated with palliative chemotherapy who died in 2008 in northern Sweden. Demographic parameters and care utilization data were registered. Data were analyzed using nonparametric methods.
Of 374 included patients, 87 (23%) received chemotherapy during the last month of life. These patients had a significantly shorter survival time from first palliative treatment to death, were admitted more frequently to hospital, more often lacked a documented decision to cease treatment, and died less frequently at home.
The results indicate covariations between palliative chemotherapy treatments in the last month of life and unfavorable patient outcomes. As almost one of four patients with incurable cancer received their last round of palliative chemotherapy
Notes
Comment In: Ann Oncol. 2011 Nov;22(11):2345-821917739
PubMed ID
21402621 View in PubMed
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Stories about becoming a hospice nurse. Reasons, expectations, hopes and concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214236
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1995 Oct;18(5):344-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
B H Rasmussen
A. Norberg
P O Sandman
Author Affiliation
Department of Advanced Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1995 Oct;18(5):344-54
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hospice Care - manpower - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Terminal Care - manpower - psychology
Abstract
Two months after the opening of Sweden's first purpose-built free-standing hospice, 19 nurses were asked to narrate their reasons, expectations, hopes, and concerns about their future work as hospice nurses. The stories were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The tension between endurance and enjoyment seems to be the essential feature of the nurses' stories. The nurses who were experienced in terminal care hope and expect to enjoy being hospice nurses, provided they are able to give good terminal care, that is, nursing care that is experienced as being meaningful. Those nurses who are inexperienced in terminal care hope and expect that they will be able to give and to grow as people and to develop as professionals, but do not yet know what to make of their experiences. Possible implications of the nurses' reasons, expectations, hopes, and concerns are discussed, and an understanding of the tension between endurance and enjoyment of being a hospice nurse is presented.
PubMed ID
7585488 View in PubMed
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Stories of being a hospice nurse: a journey towards finding one's footing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207213
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1997 Oct;20(5):330-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
B H Rasmussen
P O Sandman
A. Norberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Advanced Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1997 Oct;20(5):330-41
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Culture
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Philosophy, Nursing
Sweden
Terminal Care
Abstract
This article sheds light on the meaning of the lived experience of being a hospice nurse, as interpreted from in-depth interviews with 18 hospice nurses. The nurses' stories were analyzed using a phenomenologic-hermeneutic approach inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Findings were synthesized into two themes: pursuing meaningful hospice care and pursuing spiritual integrity. Results indicated that it was the nurses' conceptions of "ideal" hospice practice that seemed to be the lens through which the nurses experienced and interpreted "real" practice as being either vitalizing or devitalizing. Results also indicated that being a hospice nurse means being visible as a person, in the sphere between the sacred and the profane and on the border between eternity and the finite. In narrating these experiences, the nurses used metaphors pointing towards "the sacred" and a "consciousness of fault." The tension between "ideal" and "real" hospice practices, and the nurses' vitalizing and devitalizing experiences and their use of metaphors in narrating these experiences are interpreted in the light of Bauman's two "life strategies" of deconstructing mortality and immortality, and Ricoeur's Symbolism of Evil.
PubMed ID
9394055 View in PubMed
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Striving for becoming at-home in the midst of dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72058
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2000 Jan-Feb;17(1):31-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
B H Rasmussen
L. Jansson
A. Norberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2000 Jan-Feb;17(1):31-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Female
Hospice Care - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Organizational Culture
Philosophy, Medical
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sick Role
Sweden
Abstract
Research interviews with 12 patients at an inpatient, free-standing hospice in Sweden were analyzed, using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach, to show the effects of individual nursing care as experienced by the guests. The findings revealed that the effects of, and reactions to, nursing care were inseparable from the hospice milieu and the patients' situation, which was interpreted as including the prospect of becoming homeless. Thus, the effects of hospice spirit (nursing care and milieu) as experienced by these hospice patients represented the contrasting possibilities of hindering--or contributing to--the prospect of becoming homeless. What the patients spoke about was either a consoling or a desolating hospice spirit. A consoling hospice spirit supports experiences of wholeness and communion, i.e., becoming at-home in the midst of dying, while a desolating hospice spirit results in feelings of alienation and fragmentation, i.e., feeling homeless. Considering the dying person to be a guest rather than a patient is an important component of Swedish hospice philosophy and supports the view of the dying person as an autonomous and dignified human being.
PubMed ID
11094918 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.