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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Appendiceal mass in a neonate after surgery for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula: report of a case.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58211
Source
Surg Today. 2005;35(1):80-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Ayse Karaman
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Derya Erdogan
Ibrahim Karaman
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Surg Today. 2005;35(1):80-1
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - diagnosis - surgery
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - pathology - surgery
Esophageal Atresia - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Infant, Newborn
Laparotomy - methods
Risk assessment
Tracheoesophageal Fistula - diagnosis - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 23-day-old girl presented with abdominal distension and vomiting. She had been previously operated on for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) when she was 2 days old. An immediate laparotomy revealed an appendiceal mass caused by perforated appendicitis. The occurrence of appendicitis and an appendiceal mass is extremely rare in neonates and this may be the first such report in the world literature.
PubMed ID
15622470 View in PubMed
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A case of ectopic intraabdominal fascioliasis presented with acute abdomen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101345
Source
Turk J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jun;22(3):347-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Gönül Tanir
Ayse Karaman
Sehra Birgül Tüfekçi
Duygu Erdogan
Nilden Tuygun
Aysegül Taylan Ozkan
Author Affiliation
Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Children's Health and Diseases Training and Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Ankara, Turkey. gonultanir58@yahoo.com.
Source
Turk J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jun;22(3):347-50
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Human fascioliasis with Fasciola species occurs worldwide and is most common among rural people who tend sheep and eat uncooked water vegetables, particularly watercress. The natural history of the acute phase begins with ingestion of metacercariae encysted on various kinds of aquatic vegetation such as watercress. Fascioliasis primarily involves the liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, and occasionally ectopic sites. We describe herein a case of ectopic fascioliasis. This uncommon form of disease was peritonitis; both visceral and parietal peritoneal layers were affected with the formation of multiple nodules and ascites.
PubMed ID
21805430 View in PubMed
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Comparison of two methods for the management of appendicular mass in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29980
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2005 Feb;21(2):81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Derya Erdogan
Ibrahim Karaman
Adnan Narci
Ayse Karaman
Y Hakan Cavusoglu
M Kemal Aslan
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, 06080 Ankara, Turkey. deryaerdogan@hotmail.com
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2005 Feb;21(2):81-3
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appendectomy
Appendicitis - diagnosis - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in pediatric surgery. In the presence of an appendicular mass, surgical management can be difficult. We evaluate the results of appendix mass management both with immediate operation and conservative treatment over a period of 5 years. Forty children who presented with appendicular mass over a period of 5 years were reviewed. Their mean age was 7.6+/-2.7 years, and the mean duration of symptoms was 7.8+/-2.7 days. We evaluated the children in two groups: The first group included 19 children who were operated on immediately, and the second group included 21 children who were managed conservatively, followed by elective appendectomy. In the first group, mean hospitalization time was 8.7+/-3.2 days. The complication rate was found to be high (26.3%). Ileal injury occurred in two patients, intraabdominal abscess developed in one patient, and wound infection developed in another. Appendectomy could not be done in one patient who required another laparotomy 8 weeks later. In the second group, mean hospitalization time was 8.9+/-2.6 days. Two patients (8.6%) failed to respond to conservative management. Elective appendectomy was performed after 2-3 months. Two patients returned with perforated appendicitis 5 months and 12 months later, respectively, because they were not brought back for subsequent appendectomy. It can be concluded that conservative treatment of appendicular mass is safe; we also advocate elective appendectomy because of the probable risk of recurrence.
PubMed ID
15614511 View in PubMed
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Magill forceps technique for removal of safety pins in upper esophagus: a preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30199
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004 Sep;68(9):1189-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Ayse Karaman
Y Hakan Cavusoglu
Ibrahim Karaman
Derya Erdogan
M Kemal Aslan
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Koyluler Sokak, 15/2 Cebeci, Ankara 06590, Turkey.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004 Sep;68(9):1189-91
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Esophagoscopy - methods
Esophagus
Female
Foreign Bodies - surgery
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Instruments
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Foreign body ingestion is not an uncommon problem in children. Children can ingest various foreign objects. One of such objects is safety pin, which is not widely reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to consider the efficacy of Magill forceps for removal of safety pins from upper esophagus. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted for all children admitted to our hospital with safety pin ingestion from 1995 to 2003. In 58 children who had been found to ingest safety pin, the attachment site was gastrointestinal tract. In 12 of the cases, safety pins were located in the upper end of the esophagus. In seven of the children safety pin extraction was achieved by using a Magill forceps with the assistance of a laryngoscope maintaining general anesthesia with mask inhalation. RESULTS: Safety pins were successfully removed with Magill forceps without any complications in seven patients whom they were located in the upper esophagus. Upper esophageal safety pins in the other five patients were extracted with rigid esophagoscopy for they were not seen under direct laryngoscopy. There were no complications. CONCLUSIONS: This is a preliminary report, but we believe that the Magill forceps technique for the removal of safety pin in the upper end of the esophagus is safe and minimally invasive method compared to rigid esophagoscopy.
PubMed ID
15302151 View in PubMed
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Perianal abscess and fistula-in-ano in children: clinical characteristic, management and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101409
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2011 Jul 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2011
Author
Cagatay Evrim Afsarlar
Ayse Karaman
Gönül Tanir
Ibrahim Karaman
Engin Yilmaz
Derya Erdogan
Hasim Ata Maden
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Ismet Faruk Ozgüner
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Babür Cad., No: 44, Altindag, 06080, Ankara, Turkey, drafsarlar@yahoo.com.
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2011 Jul 23;
Date
Jul-23-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aims of this study are to evaluate the clinical characteristics of perianal abscess and fistula-in-ano in children, and to assess our experience in treatment, and to identify factors that affected the clinical outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of children with perianal abscess and fistula-in-ano was carried out in a tertiary care children's hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. Demographic information of the patients, localization of the lesions, treatment procedures, microbial organisms in pus, usage of antibiotics, abscess recurrence, development of fistula-in-ano, and duration of symptoms were recorded. Patients with systemic diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases were excluded from the study. RESULTS: A total of 158 children (146 males, 12 females) treated for perianal abscess and fistula-in-ano with a median age of 7.2 months (ranging 16 days to 18 years) were eligible for the study. Initial examination of the 136 patients revealed perianal abscess and 22 patients with fistula-in-ano. Primary treatment was incision and drainage (I/D) for the fluctuating perianal abscess (73.5%), and local care for the spontaneously (S/D) drained abscess (26.5%) with or without antibiotic therapy. Patients were divided into two groups according to age distribution, 98 of the patients were younger than 12 months, and 60 were older than 12 months of age. There was no significant difference in sex distribution, localization of the lesions, treatment procedures, recurrence of abscess and fistula-in-ano formation between the two age groups (p > 0.05). Recurrence rates (27% in I/D and 30.6% in S/D, p > 0.05) and development of fistula-in-ano (20% in I/D and 27.8 in S/D, p > 0.05) were not significant I/D and S/D groups. Kind of the microorganisms in pus swaps did not effect the fistula-in-ano formation. Usage of antibiotics significantly reduced the development of fistula-in-ano (p = 0.001), but did not effect the recurrence of perianal abscess (p > 0.05). The mean follow-up period was 10.6 ± 8.6 months. While the 9 of the overall 52 fistula-in-ano (22 initial, 30 after abscess treatment) were resolved spontaneously, 43 of the remaining needed surgical intervention (fistulotomy/fistulectomy). CONCLUSIONS: Although management of perianal abscess is still controversial, simple drainage of the perianal abscess with additional antibiotic therapy reduces the development of fistula-in-ano. Fistula-in-ano within children has a chance of spontaneous resolution thus the immediate surgical intervention should be avoided.
PubMed ID
21785979 View in PubMed
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Seven cases of neonatal appendicitis with a review of the English language literature of the last century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58327
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2003 Dec;19(11):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ayse Karaman
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Ibrahim Karaman
Ozden Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Altindag, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2003 Dec;19(11):707-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendicitis - surgery
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Neonatal appendicitis (NA) is a very rare surgical condition. The aim of this study is to once again draw attention to this subject by collecting our cases with NA and cases of NA reported separately in English-language literature over the period from 1901 to 2000. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients admitted to our hospital, with the clinical diagnosis of NA from 1990 to 2000. A survey of the English-language literature together with our own 7 cases revealed a total of 141 cases of NA during the period of 1901-2000. 128 cases had sufficient information for analysis. The patients are grouped and discussed according to these 3 time- periods: 1901-1975, 1976-1984 and 1985-2000. The incidence, etiology, and presenting signs and symptoms of appendicitis in newborns are discussed. Despite the similar perforation rates in the 3 time- periods (73%, 70%, 82%), mortality rate in NA has decreased from 78% in the 1901-1975 period, to 33% in the 1976-1984 period, and to 28% in the 1985-2000 period. A newborn baby presenting with continuous vomiting, refusal to feed, and, showing signs of pain through irritability, restlessness, sleep disturbance, and a distended abdomen; one should strongly suspect an abdominal disorder, perhaps appendicitis.
PubMed ID
14689209 View in PubMed
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Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery: Advantages of a Relatively Large Incision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265658
Source
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2015 Aug;25(8):592-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Engin Yilmaz
Cagatay Evrim Afsarlar
Ahmet Erturk
Ibrahim Karaman
Ayse Karaman
Yusuf Hakan Cavusoglu
Source
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2015 Aug;25(8):592-6
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To describe Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery (SIPES) performed on children with various diagnoses, emphasizing its advantages.
An observational case series.
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, from January 2011 to November 2014.
Areview of patient charts was conducted in which SIPES was preferred as the surgical procedure. Patient demographics, operative details, operative time, clinical outcomes, postoperative pain and cosmesis were analyzed.
SIPES was performed on 45 patients (21 girls, 24 boys). Thirty-three appendectomies, 5 varicocelectomies, 3 oophorectomies, 2 ovarian and one paratubal cyst excision, and one fallopian tube excision were performed. All except one procedures were performed through our standard 2 cm umbilical vertical or smile incision. In 18 cases, abdominal irrigation/aspiration was easily performed through the existing larger incision, as is done with open surgical technique. None of the patients had early postoperative shoulder/back pain since complete disinflation of CO2could be ensured. All of the patients/parents were satisfied with the cosmesis.
SIPES has the advantages of limiting the surgical scar to within the umbilicus and providing easy disinflation of CO2, allowing intraabdominal cleaning and extraction of large volume tissue samples through a single large umbilical incision.
PubMed ID
26305306 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.