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Human infectious diseases and the changing climate in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298985
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Audrey Waits
Anastasia Emelyanova
Antti Oksanen
Khaled Abass
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate
Climate change
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Weather
Abstract
Climatic factors, especially temperature, precipitation, and humidity play an important role in disease transmission. As the Arctic changes at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, understanding how climatic factors and climate change affect infectious disease rates is important for minimizing human and economic costs. The purpose of this systematic review was to compile recent studies in the field and compare the results to a previously published review. English language searches were conducted in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and PLOS One. Russian language searches were conducted in the Scientific Electronic Library "eLibrary.ru". This systematic review yielded 22 articles (51%) published in English and 21 articles (49%) published in Russian since 2012. Articles about zoonotic and vector-borne diseases accounted for 67% (n?=?29) of the review. Tick-borne diseases, tularemia, anthrax, and vibriosis were the most researched diseases likely to be impacted by climatic factors in the Arctic. Increased temperature and precipitation are predicted to have the greatest impact on infectious diseases in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
30317100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human infectious diseases and the changing climate in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295451
Source
Environ Int. 2018 Dec; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Audrey Waits
Anastasia Emelyanova
Antti Oksanen
Khaled Abass
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 Dec; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Climatic factors, especially temperature, precipitation, and humidity play an important role in disease transmission. As the Arctic changes at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, understanding how climatic factors and climate change affect infectious disease rates is important for minimizing human and economic costs. The purpose of this systematic review was to compile recent studies in the field and compare the results to a previously published review. English language searches were conducted in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and PLOS One. Russian language searches were conducted in the Scientific Electronic Library "eLibrary.ru". This systematic review yielded 22 articles (51%) published in English and 21 articles (49%) published in Russian since 2012. Articles about zoonotic and vector-borne diseases accounted for 67% (n?=?29) of the review. Tick-borne diseases, tularemia, anthrax, and vibriosis were the most researched diseases likely to be impacted by climatic factors in the Arctic. Increased temperature and precipitation are predicted to have the greatest impact on infectious diseases in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
30317100 View in PubMed
Less detail