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Modelling the burden of hepatitis C infection among people who inject drugs in Norway, 1973-2030.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286856
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Aug 03;17(1):541
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-03-2017
Author
Hinta Meijerink
Richard A White
Astrid Løvlie
Birgitte Freiesleben de Blasio
Olav Dalgard
Ellen J Amundsen
Espen Melum
Hilde Kløvstad
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Aug 03;17(1):541
Date
Aug-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - virology
Hepatitis C - complications - epidemiology
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - virology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Models, Theoretical
Norway - epidemiology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Lack of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) incidence data in (Norwegian) high-risk groups impedes the ability to make informed decisions on prevention measures. Thus we rely on modelling to estimate the incidence and burden of HCV infections.
We constructed a compartmental model for HCV infections in Norway among active and former people who inject drugs (PWIDs). We based yearly transition rates on literature. The model was fitted to absolute numbers of hepatitis C associated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death from national data sources (2000-2013). We estimated the number (95%CI) of HCV infections, cirrhosis, HCC and death and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) due to HCV infections in Norway, 1973-2030. We assumed treatment rates in the projected period were similar to those in 2013.
The estimated proportion of chronic HCV (including those with cirrhosis and HCC) among PWIDs was stable from 2000 (49%; 4441/9108) to 2013 (43%; 3667/8587). We estimated that the incidence of HCV among PWIDs was 381 new infections in 2015. The estimated number of people with cirrhosis, HCC, and liver transplant was predicted to increase until 2022 (1537 people). DALYs among active PWIDs estimated to peak in 2006 (3480 DALYs) and decrease to 1870 DALYs in 2030. Chronic HCV infection contributes most to the total burden of HCV infection, and peaks at 1917 DALYs (52%) in 2007. The burden of HCV related to PWID increased until 2006 with 81/100,000 DALYs inhabitants and decreased to 68/100,000 DALYs in 2015.
The burden of HCV associated with injecting drug use is considerable, with chronic HCV infection contributing most to the total burden. This model can be used to estimate the impact of different interventions on the HCV burden in Norway and to perform cost-benefit analyses of various public health measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28774261 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Dec 15;135(23-24):2136-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015

Summary of available surveillance data on hepatitis C virus infection from eight Arctic countries, 2012 to 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295354
Source
Euro Surveill. 2018 Oct; 23(40):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Prabhu P Gounder
Anders Koch
Ginger Provo
Astrid Lovlie
Josefine Lundberg Ederth
Maria Axelsson
Chris P Archibald
Brendan Hanley
Angie Mullen
Myrna Matheson
David Allison
Henrik Trykker
Thomas W Hennessy
Markku Kuusi
Vladimir Chulanov
Brian J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2018 Oct; 23(40):
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We summarised available hepatitis C virus (HCV) surveillance data for 2012-14 from Arctic/sub-Arctic countries/regions. We sent a HCV data collection template by email to public health authorities in all jurisdictions. Population statistics obtained from census sources for each country were used to estimate rates of reported acute and chronic/undifferentiated HCV cases. Seven countries with Arctic regions (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Greenland, Norway, Sweden and the United States, represented by the state of Alaska), including three Canadian territories and one province, as well as 11 Russian subnational Arctic regions, completed the data collection template. Data on acute HCV infection during 2014 was available from three Arctic countries and all Russian Arctic regions (rate range 0/100,000 population in Greenland, as well as Nenets and Chukotka Automous Okrugs (Russian subnational Arctic regions) to 3.7/100,000 in the Russian Republic of Komi). The rate of people with chronic/undifferentiated HCV infection in 2014 ranged from 0/100,000 in Greenland to 171.2/100,000 in Alaska. In most countries/regions, the majority of HCV-infected people were male and aged 19-64 years. Differences in surveillance methods preclude direct comparisons of HCV surveillance data between Arctic countries/regions. Our data can inform future efforts to develop standardised approaches to HCV surveillance in the Arctic countries/regions by identifying similarities/differences between the surveillance data collected.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30301489 View in PubMed
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