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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
relation to lifestyle and genetic factors View project Alastair B Ross Chalmers University of Technology 99 PUBLICATIONS   2,772 CITATIONS    SEE PROFILE Asa Johansson Uppsala University 329 PUBLICATIONS   13,964 CITATIONS    SEE PROFILE Sven Hassler University of Gothenburg 25 PUBLICATIONS
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
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Animal source food intake and association with blood cholesterol, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in a northern Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107708
Source
Pages 421-427 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):421-427
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Animal source food intake and association with blood cholesterol, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in a northern Swedish population Wilmar lgl1 , Afaf Kamal-Eldin2 , Asa Johansson 1 , Gerhard Liebisch3 , Carsten Gnewuch3 , Gerd Schmitz3 and Ulf Gyllensten 1 * 1
  1 document  
Author
Wilmar Igl
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Asa Johansson
Gerhard Liebisch
Carsten Gnewuch
Gerd Schmitz
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Pages 421-427 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):421-427
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Glycerophospholipids - blood
Humans
Male
Meat - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Risk factors
Sphingolipids - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The high intake of game meat in populations with a subsistence-based diet may affect their blood lipids and health status.
To examine the association between diet and circulating levels of blood lipid levels in a northern Swedish population.
We compared a group with traditional lifestyle (TLS) based on reindeer herding (TLS group) with those from the same area with a non-traditional lifestyle (NTLS) typical of more industrialized regions of Sweden (NTLS group). The analysis was based on self-reported intake of animal source food (i.e. non-game meat, game meat, fish, dairy products and eggs) and the serum blood level of a number of lipids [total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides (TG), glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids].
The TLS group had higher cholesterol, LDL and HDL levels than the reference group. Of the TLS group, 65% had cholesterol levels above the threshold for increased risk of coronary heart disease (= 240 mg/dl), as compared to 38% of the NTLS group. Self-reported consumption of game meat was positively associated with TC and LDL.
The high game meat consumption of the TLS group is associated with increased cholesterol levels. High intake of animal protein and fat and low fibre is known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but other studies of the TLS in northern Sweden have shown comparable incidences of cardiovascular disease to the reference (NTLS) group from the same geographical area. This indicates that factors other than TC influence disease risk. One such possible factor is dietary phospholipids, which are also found in high amounts specifically in game meat and have been shown to inhibit cholesterol absorption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984293 View in PubMed
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Bacterial colonization and resistance patterns in 133 patients undergoing a primary hip- or knee replacement in Southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116322
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Feb;84(1):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Anna Stefánsdóttir
Asa Johansson
Lars Lidgren
Philippe Wagner
Annette W-Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anna.stefansdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2013 Feb;84(1):87-91
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Cloxacillin - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Gentamicins - therapeutic use
Groin - microbiology
Humans
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity - microbiology
Postoperative Period
Preoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis-Related Infections - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Staphylococcus aureus
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Prosthetic joint infections can be caused by bacteria derived from the patient's skin. The aim of the study was: (1) to determine which bacteria colonize the nose and groin in patients planned for primary hip or knee arthroplasty, (2) to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns, and (3) to monitor changes in bacterial colonization and resistance patterns connected to surgery.
2 weeks before scheduled primary hip or knee arthroplasty, culture samples were taken from the anterior nares and from the groin of 133 consecutive patients. At surgery, cloxacillin was given prophylactically and cement with gentamicin was used. 2 weeks after surgery, another set of samples were taken from 120 of these patients. Bacterial findings and resistance patterns were analyzed.
Preoperatively, 95% of the patients had coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) in the groin and 77% in the nose. The proportion of patients with a methicillin-resistant CNS in the groin increased from 20% preoperatively to 50% postoperatively (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23409844 View in PubMed
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Dysfunction of Circulating Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Monocytes in Ambulatory Cirrhotics Predicts Patient Outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284040
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2016 Aug;61(8):2294-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Konstantina Sargenti
Åsa Johansson
Sara Bertilsson
Inger Mattsby-Baltzer
Daniel Klintman
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2016 Aug;61(8):2294-302
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure - epidemiology
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cytokines - immunology
Disease Progression
Escherichia coli
Female
Humans
Interleukin-6 - immunology
Interleukin-8 - immunology
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - immunology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Monocytes - immunology
Neutrophils - immunology
Phagocytosis
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Burst
Sepsis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - immunology
Abstract
Cirrhosis represents a state of functional immune paresis with increased infection risk.
To investigate polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte and monocyte function in ambulatory cirrhotics, and their potential relation with cirrhosis etiology or patient outcome.
Consecutive ambulatory cirrhotics without current or recent ( 0.05 for all). In Cox regression analysis, increased stimulated monocyte and PMN burst were independent predictors of sepsis, severe sepsis and ACLF occurrence. Also, increased stimulated monocyte burst was associated with worse transplant-free survival (p 
PubMed ID
27010544 View in PubMed
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Empowering knowledge and its connection to health-related quality of life: A cross-cultural study: A concise and informative title: Empowering knowledge and its connection to health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280866
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2016 Feb;29:211-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Krista Koekenbier
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Esther Cabrera
Natalia Istomina
Åsa Johansson Stark
Jouko Katajisto
Chryssoula Lemonidou
Evridiki Papastavrou
Sanna Salanterä
Arun Sigurdardottir
Kirsi Valkeapää
Sini Eloranta
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2016 Feb;29:211-6
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Finland
Greece
Iceland
Osteoarthritis - surgery
Patient Participation
Quality of Life
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
Assess the association between patient education (i.e. empowering knowledge) and preoperative health-related quality of life, 6 months postoperative health-related quality of life, and the increase in health-related quality of life in osteoarthritis patients who underwent total hip or total knee arthroplasty.
This is a cross-cultural comparative follow-up study using structured instruments to measure the difference between expected and received patient education and self-reported health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) in Finland, Greece, Iceland, Spain and Sweden.
The health-related quality of life was significantly increased 6 months postoperatively in all countries due to the arthroplasties. In the total sample, higher levels of empowering knowledge were associated with a higher health-related quality of life, both pre- and postoperatively, but not with a higher increase in health-related quality of life. On the national level, postoperative health-related quality of life was associated with higher levels of empowering knowledge in Finland, Iceland and Sweden. The increase in health-related quality of life was associated with levels of empowering knowledge for Greece.
Overall, it can be concluded that the level of empowering knowledge was associated with high postoperative health-related quality of life in the total sample, even though there is some variation in the results per country.
PubMed ID
26856516 View in PubMed
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Fulfilment of knowledge expectations among family members of patients undergoing arthroplasty: a European perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280486
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):615-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Andreas Charalambous
Jouko Katajisto
Åsa Johansson Stark
Panayota Sourtzi
Adelaida Zabalegui
Kirsi Valkeapää
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):615-24
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - nursing - psychology
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - psychology
Caregivers - education - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culturally Competent Care
Cyprus
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Greece
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In the recovery process of arthroplasty patients, their family members play an important role due to short hospital stay and increased age of patients. Family members need to have knowledge to be able to support the patient. The aim of this study was to explore expected and received knowledge in family members of arthroplasty patients and describe the relationships between the differences in received and expected knowledge and background factors, country, information and control preferences and access to knowledge. The study was conducted in six European countries (Cyprus, Greece, Finland, Iceland, Spain and Sweden). The study design was cross-cultural, prospective and comparative with two measurement points: pre-operative and at discharge from hospital. Knowledge Expectations of significant other-scale and Krantz Health Opinion Survey were used before surgery and Received Knowledge of significant other-scale and Access to Knowledge at discharge. Patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty in seventeen hospitals were asked to identify one family member. The sample size was decided by power calculation. A total of 615 participants answered the questionnaires at both measurements. Family members perceived to receive less knowledge than they expected to have, most unfulfilled knowledge expectations were in the financial, social and experiential dimensions of knowledge. Seventy-four per cent of participants had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Increased access to information from healthcare providers decreased the difference between received and expected knowledge. Compared to family members in southern Europe, those in the Nordic countries had more unfulfilled knowledge expectations and less access to information from healthcare providers. The evidence from this study highlights the need to involve the family members in the educational approach.
PubMed ID
25648518 View in PubMed
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The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty -- a Nordic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268598
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 Oct;23(19-20):2896-908
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Brynja Ingadottir
Asa Johansson Stark
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Kirsi Valkeapää
Mitra Unosson
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 Oct;23(19-20):2896-908
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - nursing - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Male
Nursing Process
Patient Education as Topic
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Period
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.
Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.
Descriptive, prospective survey.
In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.
Patients' knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.
Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.
The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.
PubMed ID
24476393 View in PubMed
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Genetic adaptation of fatty-acid metabolism: a human-specific haplotype increasing the biosynthesis of long-chain omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125228
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2012 May 4;90(5):809-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2012
Author
Adam Ameur
Stefan Enroth
Asa Johansson
Ghazal Zaboli
Wilmar Igl
Anna C V Johansson
Manuel A Rivas
Mark J Daly
Gerd Schmitz
Andrew A Hicks
Thomas Meitinger
Lars Feuk
Cornelia van Duijn
Ben Oostra
Peter P Pramstaller
Igor Rudan
Alan F Wright
James F Wilson
Harry Campbell
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, SciLifeLab Uppsala, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2012 May 4;90(5):809-20
Date
May-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Croatia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Fatty Acid Desaturases - genetics - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - metabolism
Haplotypes
Humans
Italy
Life Style
Molecular Sequence Data
Multigene Family
Neanderthals
Phylogeography
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Scotland
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden
Abstract
Omega-3 and omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are essential for the development and function of the human brain. They can be obtained directly from food, e.g., fish, or synthesized from precursor molecules found in vegetable oils. To determine the importance of genetic variability to fatty-acid biosynthesis, we studied FADS1 and FADS2, which encode rate-limiting enzymes for fatty-acid conversion. We performed genome-wide genotyping (n = 5,652 individuals) and targeted resequencing (n = 960 individuals) of the FADS region in five European population cohorts. We also analyzed available genomic data from human populations, archaic hominins, and more distant primates. Our results show that present-day humans have two common FADS haplotypes-defined by 28 closely linked SNPs across 38.9 kb-that differ dramatically in their ability to generate LC-PUFAs. No independent effects on FADS activity were seen for rare SNPs detected by targeted resequencing. The more efficient, evolutionarily derived haplotype appeared after the lineage split leading to modern humans and Neanderthals and shows evidence of positive selection. This human-specific haplotype increases the efficiency of synthesizing essential long-chain fatty acids from precursors and thereby might have provided an advantage in environments with limited access to dietary LC-PUFAs. In the modern world, this haplotype has been associated with lifestyle-related diseases, such as coronary artery disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22503634 View in PubMed
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Identification of sequence variants influencing immunoglobulin levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285834
Source
Nat Genet. 2017 Aug;49(8):1182-1191
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Stefan Jonsson
Gardar Sveinbjornsson
Aitzkoa Lopez de Lapuente Portilla
Bhairavi Swaminathan
Rosina Plomp
Gillian Dekkers
Ram Ajore
Mina Ali
Arthur E H Bentlage
Evelina Elmér
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Sigurjon A Gudjonsson
Urban Gullberg
Arnaldur Gylfason
Bjarni V Halldorsson
Markus Hansson
Hilma Holm
Åsa Johansson
Ellinor Johnsson
Aslaug Jonasdottir
Bjorn R Ludviksson
Asmundur Oddsson
Isleifur Olafsson
Sigurgeir Olafsson
Olof Sigurdardottir
Asgeir Sigurdsson
Lilja Stefansdottir
Gisli Masson
Patrick Sulem
Manfred Wuhrer
Anna-Karin Wihlborg
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Gestur Vidarsson
Ingileif Jonsdottir
Björn Nilsson
Kari Stefansson
Source
Nat Genet. 2017 Aug;49(8):1182-1191
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Hematopoiesis - genetics
Humans
Iceland
Immunity, Humoral - genetics
Immunoglobulin Class Switching - genetics
Immunoglobulin Isotypes - genetics
Immunoglobulins - genetics
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Abstract
Immunoglobulins are the effector molecules of the adaptive humoral immune system. In a genome-wide association study of 19,219 individuals, we found 38 new variants and replicated 5 known variants associating with IgA, IgG or IgM levels or with composite immunoglobulin traits, accounted for by 32 loci. Variants at these loci also affect the risk of autoimmune diseases and blood malignancies and influence blood cell development. Notable associations include a rare variant at RUNX3 decreasing IgA levels by shifting isoform proportions (rs188468174[C>T]: P = 8.3 × 10(-55), ß = -0.90 s.d.), a rare in-frame deletion in FCGR2B abolishing IgG binding to the encoded receptor (p.Asn106del: P = 4.2 × 10(-8), ß = 1.03 s.d.), four IGH locus variants influencing class switching, and ten new associations with the HLA region. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of humoral immunity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28628107 View in PubMed
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Mishaps in the management of stroke: a review of 214 complaints to a medical responsibility board.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71017
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2004;18(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Asa Johansson
Katarina Lagerstedt
Kjell Asplund
Author Affiliation
Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, University Hospital, Northern Branch, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2004;18(1):16-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebrovascular Accident - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diagnostic Errors
Employee Discipline
Female
Humans
Male
Malpractice
Medication Errors
Nurses
Nursing Care
Physicians
Professional-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - diagnosis
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This is the first survey of formal complaints to a Medical Responsibility Board (MRB) in the literature concerning stroke management and the disciplinary actions to which the complaints lead. METHODS: All available complaints submitted to the Swedish MRB during a 5-year period that concerned stroke management (n = 214) were reviewed. We compiled information on the plaintiffs, the health care staff the complaints were directed against, the area of stroke management involved and the disciplinary actions taken by the MRB. RESULTS: Only 1% of all complaints to the MRB concerned stroke. Three quarters of these complaints were directed against physicians and one fifth against nurses. 23 complaints (11%) resulted in a warning or an admonition. Nearly all disciplinary actions against physicians (12 of 13) concerned misdiagnoses, of subarachnoid hemorrhage in particular. The most common reason for a nurse receiving a warning or an admonition was negligent handling of drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The survey has identified two areas in which educational programs to improve patient safety seem essential. The small number of formal complaints and disciplinary actions suggest that other, blameless procedures have a greater potential than MRB actions to reduce mishaps in routine stroke care.
PubMed ID
15159616 View in PubMed
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