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The effect of occupational noise exposure on tinnitus and sound-induced auditory fatigue among obstetrics personnel: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267920
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e005793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sofie Fredriksson
Oscar Hammar
Kjell Torén
Artur Tenenbaum
Kerstin Persson Waye
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e005793
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Auditory Fatigue - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Obstetrics
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sound - adverse effects
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Tinnitus - etiology
Abstract
There is a lack of research on effects of occupational noise exposure in traditionally female-dominated workplaces. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess risk of noise-induced hearing-related symptoms among obstetrics personnel.
A cross-sectional study was performed at an obstetric ward in Sweden including a questionnaire among all employees and sound level measurements in 61 work shifts at the same ward.
115 female employees responded to a questionnaire (72% of all 160 employees invited).
Self-reported hearing-related symptoms in relation to calculated occupational noise exposure dose and measured sound levels.
Sound levels exceeded the 80 dB LAeq limit for protection of hearing in 46% of the measured work shifts. One or more hearing-related symptoms were reported by 55% of the personnel. In logistic regression models, a significant association was found between occupational noise exposure dose and tinnitus (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.09) and sound-induced auditory fatigue (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07). Work-related stress and noise annoyance at work were reported by almost half of the personnel. Sound-induced auditory fatigue was associated with work-related stress and noise annoyance at work, although stress slightly missed significance in a multivariable model. No significant interactions were found.
This study presents new results showing that obstetrics personnel are at risk of noise-induced hearing-related symptoms. Current exposure levels at the workplace are high and occupational noise exposure dose has significant effects on tinnitus and sound-induced auditory fatigue among the personnel. These results indicate that preventative action regarding noise exposure is required in obstetrics care and that risk assessments may be needed in previously unstudied non-industrial communication-intense sound environments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25818267 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in care-seeking behavior and healthcare consumption immediately after whiplash trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285509
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(4):e0176328
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Artur Tenenbaum
Lena Nordeman
Katharina S Sunnerhagen
Ronny Gunnarsson
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(4):e0176328
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Databases, Factual
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services - utilization
Health Surveys
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Time Factors
Whiplash Injuries - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to study gender differences in care-seeking behavior and treatment provided immediately after whiplash trauma.
Participants were residents from a defined geographical area, Skaraborg County in the southwestern part of Sweden. A cohort of 3,368 persons exposed to whiplash trauma and attending a healthcare facility immediately after the trauma between 1999 and 2008 were identified in a database. Information about gender, age, time elapsed prior to seeking care, type of healthcare contact, initial treatment provided and eventual hospitalization time was retrieved.
Women sought care later than men (p = 0.00074). Women consulted primary healthcare first more often than men, who more often first sought hospital care (p = 0.0060). There were no gender differences regarding the type of treatment after trauma. Women had longer hospital admission than men (p = 0.022), indicating their injuries were at least similar to or worse than men's.
Women sought healthcare later than men after whiplash trauma. Although not directly investigated in this study, it raises the question if this may reduce their probability of getting financial compensation compared to men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28441465 View in PubMed
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Improvements in physical and mental health following a rehabilitation programme for breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96533
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2010 Jun 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2010
Author
Aina Johnsson
Artur Tenenbaum
Hugo Westerlund
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Social Work, Sweden; Department of Social Work, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2010 Jun 26;
Date
Jun-26-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate how breast cancer patients referred to in-patient rehabilitation at Mösseberg Rehabilitation Centre (MRC) in Sweden perceive their life situation, and if their life satisfaction and mental health have changed three months later. METHOD: This prospective study is based on 46 women, all of them in working age. Three validated questionnaires were used, the Life Satisfaction (Li-Sat 11) scale, the Maastricht Questionnaire and the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ). RESULTS: Statistically significant improvements for the variables physical and mental health were seen in the measurements made using the Li-Sat 11 scale. The SMBQ survey showed a statistically significant improvement in the composite results for the indices involved. Likewise, the Maastricht Questionnaire showed statistically significant improvements in health status with respect to feelings of exhaustion and fatigue. CONCLUSION: More effective treatments have resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer survivors and in the demand for rehabilitation. This study shows improvements in health and satisfaction with health, but cannot conclude this result as only an effect of the rehabilitation programme. Since only a few studies have until now shed light on the benefits of in-patient rehabilitation following a breast cancer diagnosis, there is an urgent need for continued research in this area.
PubMed ID
20584626 View in PubMed
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The Lund University Checklist for Incipient Exhaustion-a cross-sectional comparison of a new instrument with similar contemporary tools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278222
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Apr 21;16:350
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2016
Author
Roger Persson
Kai Österberg
Njördur Viborg
Peter Jönsson
Artur Tenenbaum
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Apr 21;16:350
Date
Apr-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Checklist
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Work - psychology
Abstract
Stress-related health problems (e.g., work-related exhaustion) are a societal concern in many postindustrial countries. Experience suggests that early detection and intervention are crucial in preventing long-term negative consequences. In the present study, we benchmark a new tool for early identification of work-related exhaustion-the Lund University Checklist for Incipient Exhaustion (LUCIE)-against other contextually relevant inventories and two contemporary Swedish screening scales.
A cross-sectional population sample (n?=?1355) completed: LUCIE, Karolinska Exhaustion Disorder Scale (KEDS), Self-reported Exhaustion Disorder Scale (s-ED), Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), Big Five Inventory (BFI), and items concerning work-family interference and stress in private life.
Increasing signs of exhaustion on LUCIE were positively associated with signs of exhaustion on KEDS and s-ED. The prevalence rates were 13.4, 13.8 and 7.8 %, respectively (3.8 % were identified by all three instruments). Increasing signs of exhaustion on LUCIE were also positively associated with reports of burnout, job demands, stress in private life, family-to-work interference and neuroticism as well as negatively associated with reports of job control, job support and work engagement.
LUCIE, which is intended to detect pre-stages of ED, exhibits logical and coherent positive relations with KEDS and s-ED as well as other conceptually similar inventories. The results suggest that LUCIE has the potential to detect mild states of exhaustion (possibly representing pre-stages to ED) that if not brought to the attention of the healthcare system and treated, may develop in to ED. The prospective validity remains to be evaluated.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27099142 View in PubMed
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Normal nerve conduction velocity and vibrotactile perception thresholds in computer users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175204
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Apr;78(3):239-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Helena Sandén
Micael Edblom
Anna Ekman
Artur Tenenbaum
B Gunnar Wallin
Mats Hagberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, S:t Sigfridsgatan 85, 412 66, Göteborg, Sweden. helena.jacobson@amm.gu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Apr;78(3):239-42
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Computers
Female
Humans
Median Nerve - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Touch
Ulnar Nerve - physiopathology
Vibration
Abstract
A literature report described significantly raised vibration threshold within the territory of the median nerve in a group of office workers and concluded that the results indicated a change in the function of large sensory fibres. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare vibrotactile perception thresholds and nerve conduction measurements in the upper extremity between female computer users (secretaries) and female non-users (nurses).
Eighty-two secretaries, aged 25-65 (median 44) years and 35 nurses, aged 24-57 (median 46) years went through nerve conduction measurements on the dominant hand and also a vibration threshold test with readings over the hand at five sites which tested cutaneous innervation of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves.
There was no significant difference in any parameter of the nerve conduction testing and there was no significant difference in any parameter of the vibration threshold test between secretaries and nurses. The numerical differences between groups were small and in both directions and thus do not indicate a power problem.
We saw no signs of early neural deficits of large sensory fibres in subjects who intensively use computer keyboard equipment.
PubMed ID
15838714 View in PubMed
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The Quebec classification and a new Swedish classification for whiplash-associated disorders in relation to life satisfaction in patients at high risk of chronic functional impairment and disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188032
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 May;34(3):114-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Artur Tenenbaum
Marcelo Rivano-Fischer
Carsten Tjell
Micael Edblom
Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen
Author Affiliation
Mösseberg Rehabilitation Center, Mösseberg Kurort, Falköping, Sweden. artur.tenenbaum@mosseberg.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 May;34(3):114-8
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Personal Satisfaction
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Risk factors
Sweden
Whiplash Injuries - classification - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
Unlike the Quebec classification system, which is based primarily on pathoanatomy, a new Swedish classification system is based on the site of functional impairment and disability. A prospective study was performed on 85 patients with whiplash-associated disorders grade II according to the Quebec classification. The patients were examined 3-36 months following trauma. A team of professionals with different training performed the diagnostic procedure. An independent assessor classified these patients according to a Swedish classification system. All patients answered questionnaire regarding life satisfaction. Logistic regression demonstrated significant differences in 6 of 10 specific dimensions of life satisfaction between the classification categories C and D (presence of arm symptoms) in a Swedish classification. Patients with whiplash-associated disorders grade II and neuropsychological symptoms seem to have a worse prognosis for spontaneous recovery than those without. A new Swedish classification system seems to be an important complement to the Quebec classification.
PubMed ID
12395938 View in PubMed
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Two Swedish screening instruments for exhaustion disorder: cross-sectional associations with burnout, work stress, private life stress, and personality traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283461
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jun;45(4):381-388
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Roger Persson
Kai Österberg
Njördur Viborg
Peter Jönsson
Artur Tenenbaum
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jun;45(4):381-388
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Personality
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
To examine the relationships of two screening instruments recently developed for assessment of exhaustion disorder (ED) with some other well-known inventories intended to assess ED-related concepts and self-reports of job demands, job control, job support, private life stressors, and personality factors.
A cross-sectional population sample ( n = 1355) completed: the Karolinska Exhaustion Disorder Scale (KEDS), Self-reported Exhaustion Disorder Scale (s-ED), Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), Big Five Inventory (BFI), and items concerning family-to-work interference and stress in private life.
Compared to participants without any indication of ED, participants classified as having ED on KEDS or s-ED had higher scores on all four SMBQ subscales, lower scores on the UWES-9 subscales vigor and dedication, higher JCQ job demands scores, lower JCQ job support scores, higher degrees of family-to-work interference and stress in private life, and higher BFI neuroticism and openness scores. In addition, participants classified as having ED on KEDS had lower scores on the UWES-9 absorption subscale, the JCQ job control scale, and lower BFI extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness scores, compared to the subgroup not classified as having ED.
As expected, we observed an overall pattern of associations between the ED screening inventories KEDS and s-ED and measures of burnout, work engagement, job demands-control-support, stress in private life, family-to-work interference, and personality factors. The results suggest that instruments designed to assess burnout, work engagement, and ED share common ground, despite their conceptual differences.
PubMed ID
28367741 View in PubMed
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Using nature-based rehabilitation to restart a stalled process of rehabilitation in individuals with stress-related mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272317
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1928-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Eva Sahlin
Gunnar Ahlborg
Artur Tenenbaum
Patrik Grahn
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1928-51
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - therapy
Depression - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services
Self-Assessment
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
After a period of decrease, sick leave in Sweden due to psychiatric diagnoses is on the increase. The lack of established rehabilitation programmes for patients with stress-related mental disorders (SRMD) has opened up for the use of garden/nature in a multimodal rehabilitation context (Nature-Based Rehabilitation, NBR). Region Västra Götaland (VGR) started an NBR to offer additional rehabilitation for its employees on long-term sick leave due to SRMD, where initial care had not been sufficient. The aim was to explore whether the mental health and well-being of NBR participants had improved at the end of the NBR and at three follow-ups, and to explore the development of sick leave and health care utilization according to the NBR model (n = 57) and an occupational health service (OHS) model (n = 45). Self-assessment instruments for measuring burnout, depression, anxiety and wellbeing, and data from regional and national registers were used. Results showed decreased scores on burnout, depression and anxiety, and increased well-being scores and significantly reduced health care utilization in the NBR group. A large movement from ordinary sickness benefit to rehabilitation benefit was observed, which was not observed in the OHS group. The two groups were in different rehabilitation phases, which limited comparisons. The results point to beneficial effects of using NBR for this patient group and for enhancing a stalled rehabilitation process.
Notes
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Erratum In: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Jun;12(6):6946-726090608
PubMed ID
25671775 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.