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Cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms among subjects with and without hypertension: the National FINRISK Study 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301017
Source
European Journal of Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt078. Epub 2013 Jun 22.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ikäheimo TM
Lehtinen T
Antikainen R
Jokelainen J
Näyhä S
Hassi J
Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S
Laatikainen T
Jousilahti P
Jaakkola JJ
Source
European Journal of Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt078. Epub 2013 Jun 22.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular diseases
Complications
Epidemiology
Cold Temperature
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exposure to cold weather increases blood pressure (BP) and may aggravate the symptoms and influence the prognosis of subjects with a diagnosis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with hypertension alone or in combination with another cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms more commonly than persons without hypertension. This information is relevant for proper treatment and could serve as an indicator for predicting wintertime morbidity and mortality.
METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire inquiring of cold-related symptoms was obtained from 6591 men and women aged 25-74 yrs of the FINRISK Study 2002 population. BP was measured in association with clinical examinations. Symptom prevalence was compared between subjects with diagnosed hypertensive disease with (n = 395) or without (n = 764) another CVD, untreated diagnosed hypertension (n = 1308), measured high BP (n = 1070) and a reference group (n = 2728) with normal BP.
RESULTS: Hypertension in combination with another CVD was associated with increased cold-related dyspnoea (men: adjusted odds ratio 3.94, 95% confidence interval 2.57-6.02)/women: 4.41, 2.84-6.86), cough (2.64, 1.62-4.32/4.26, 2.60-6.99), wheezing (2.51, 1.42-4.43/;3.73, 2.08-6.69), mucus excretion (1.90, 1.24-2.91/2.53, 1.54-4.16), chest pain (22.5, 9.81-51.7/17.7, 8.37-37.5) and arrhythmias (43.4, 8.91-211/8.99, 3.99-20.2), compared with the reference group. Both diagnosed treated hypertension and untreated hypertension and measured high BP resulted in increased cardiorespiratory symptoms during the cold season.
CONCLUSION: Hypertension alone and together with another CVD is strongly associated with cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms. As these symptoms may predict adverse health events, hypertensive patients need customized care and advice on how to cope with cold weather.
PubMed ID
23794677 View in PubMed
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Effects of sympatholytic therapy on insulin sensitivity indices in hypertensive postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84589
Source
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Jul;45(7):394-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Kaaja R.
Kujala S.
Manhem K.
Katzman P.
Kibarskis A.
Antikainen R.
Ylihärsilä H.
Erkkola R.
Tuomilehto J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. risto.kaaja@hus.fi
Source
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Jul;45(7):394-401
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - blood - drug therapy
Imidazoles - therapeutic use
Imidazoline Receptors - agonists
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lithuania
Middle Aged
Obesity - drug therapy - metabolism
Postmenopause
Sweden
Sympatholytics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors are often ineffectively controlled in hypertensive postmenopausal women, and moreover, some antihypertensive drugs may increase particular risk factors such as insulin resistance. In a multicenter, multinational (Finland, Sweden, Lithuania), double-blind, prospectively randomized study hypertensive obese postmenopausal women without hormone therapy (n = 98) were randomly assigned to receive treatment with either the centrally acting agent moxonidine, 0.6 mg/day, or with the peripherally acting atenolol, 50 mg/day, for 8 weeks. In addition to blood pressure measurements, insulin sensitivity was estimated by the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and by the insulin sensitivity index (ISI-Matsuda). Subgroup analysis in insulin-resistant women (fasting P-insulin > or = 10 mU/l) and blood pressure responders (diastolic blood pressure or = 10 mmHg) were also carried out. Both atenolol and moxonidine led to a significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure of 9.5 mmHg and 6.2 mmHg, respectively. Among insulin-resistant women, an increase in the insulin sensitivity assessed by ISI was improved with moxonidine treatment (p = 0.025). A decrease in insulin sensitivity assessed by QUICKI was observed with atenolol treatment in women with fasting insulin level
PubMed ID
17725246 View in PubMed
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