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Bone marrow reticulin and collagen content in patients with adult chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a Danish nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100184
Source
Am J Hematol. 2010 Dec;85(12):930-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Marianne Schmidt Ettrup
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Malene Cramer Engebjerg
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Mette Nørgaard
Steven Cha
Sean Zhao
Preben Johansen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, Århus N, Denmark.
Source
Am J Hematol. 2010 Dec;85(12):930-4
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Marrow - chemistry - pathology
Collagen - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrosis - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic - pathology
Reticulin - analysis
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We quantified and differentiated reticulin and collagen content in bone marrow specimens from chronic immune thrombocytopenic (ITP) patients and examined the correlation between some clinical characteristics and the fibrosis grading. Through the Danish National Patient Registry, we identified 378 patients with chronic ITP from 1997 until 2007. Of these, 253 (67%) had undergone at least one bone marrow biopsy, and we retrieved the bone marrow specimens from 187 (74%). We graded the bone marrow content of reticulin and collagen according to the Thiele scale (Grade 0-3). We also retrieved information on patients' clinical characteristics. We examined the prevalence of bone marrow fibrosis grading > 0 by patients' age (= 75 years and > 75 years), sex, platelet count at baseline (0. Of these, 72 (39%) had Grade 1 reticulin fibers present. Only three patients ( 0 was lower in patients aged > 75 years than = 75 years (prevalence ratio = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.36-1.15) and lower in men than women (prevalence ratio = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.45-1.09), while a baseline platelet count = 30 × 10?/L was associated with a higher prevalence of grading > 0 (prevalence ratio = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.81-1.86). Thus, bone marrow reticulin and collagen content in chronic ITP patients may be associated with some clinical characteristics.
PubMed ID
20981681 View in PubMed
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Mortality in cancer patients with a history of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma--a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125720
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:126
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir
Timothy L Lash
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Anne Braae Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. saj@dce.au.dk
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:126
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
Rectal Neoplasms - mortality
Skin Neoplasms - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is associated with underlying immunosuppression, so it may be a prognostic marker in patients with subsequent cancer. We therefore conducted a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study to evaluate whether a history of cutaneuos SCC has prognostic impact in patients with one of the following index cancers: non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), or cancer of the lung, colon, rectum, breast, or prostate.
We used Danish medical databases, which cover the entire Danish population of 5.6 million inhabitants and linked them using the unique personal identification number assigned to all Danish residents. From 1982 through 2003, we identified 745 index cancer patients with and 79,143 without previous cutaneous SCC. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we calculated adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Overall, previous SCC was associated with an increased mortality of cancer (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04-1.23). When examining index cancers separately, increased MRRs were found for cancer of the lung (MRR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05-1.43), colon (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92-1.40), rectum (MRR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67), breast (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.82-1.43), and NHL (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.81-1.47), but not for prostate cancer (MRR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83-1.18).
Our results suggest that previous cutaneous SCC is associated with poor prognosis of some cancers. This finding stresses the importance of adherence to the existing recommendations of screening, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer in patients with a history of SCC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22458954 View in PubMed
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Non-melanoma skin cancer and ten-year all-cause mortality: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96570
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Anna Lei Lamberg
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Anne Braae Olesen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Confounding from comorbidity and socioeconomic status may have biased earlier findings of all-cause mortality among patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We therefore examined all-cause mortality among 72,295 Danish patients with BCC, 11,601 with SCC, and 383,714 age- and gender-matched population control cohort subjects with extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status. Data on cancer, death, and socioeconomic status were obtained from medical databases and Statistics Denmark. We analysed data using Cox regression analysis, with estimation of 10-year mortality rate ratios (MRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Mortality was reduced among patients with BCC (10-year MRR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.89-0.92) and did not vary by age, comorbidity, or socioeconomic status. Mortality among patients with SCC was increased and varied by age, selected chronic diseases, but not socioeconomic status. The reduced mortality observed among patients with BCC and the increased mortality among patients with SCC persisted even after extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status.
PubMed ID
20574600 View in PubMed
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Predictors for splenectomy among patients with primary chronic immune thrombocytopenia: a population-based cohort study from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99239
Source
Ann Hematol. 2010 Aug 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2010
Author
Annette Ostergaard Jensen
Mette Nørgaard
Malene Cramer Engebjerg
Dora Körmendiné Farkas
Jon P Fryzek
Sean Zhao
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Arhus N., Denmark, aoj@dce.au.dk.
Source
Ann Hematol. 2010 Aug 13;
Date
Aug-13-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We conducted a nationwide cohort study of adult Danish patients with primary chronic immune thrombocytopenia (cITP) to examine selected patient and clinical characteristics as predictors for splenectomy. We analyzed data from the Danish National Patient Registry and patient medical records from 1996 to 2007. Using Cox regression analyses, we calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) for splenectomy. We included 371 adult cITP patients. Of these, 87 patients (23%) underwent a splenectomy during a median of 3.6 years of follow-up. The majority (84%) of cITP patients who underwent splenectomy had splenectomy within the first year after cITP diagnosis. Predictors for splenectomy included age
PubMed ID
20706720 View in PubMed
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Skeletal related events, bone metastasis and survival of prostate cancer: a population based cohort study in Denmark (1999 to 2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96934
Source
J Urol. 2010 Jul;184(1):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mette Nørgaard
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Kara Cetin
Jon P Fryzek
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark, and Global Epidemiology, Amgen, Inc. (KC, JPF), Thousand Oaks, California, USA.
Source
J Urol. 2010 Jul;184(1):162-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - secondary
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Registries
Survival Analysis
Abstract
PURPOSE: We describe mortality in patients with prostate cancer with and without bone metastasis further characterized by skeletal related events. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a cohort study of 23,087 incident patients with prostate cancer with a median 2.2-year followup identified through the Danish National Patient Registry from 1999 to 2007. We estimated the cumulative incidence of bone metastasis and skeletal related events, and described survival using the Kaplan-Meier method. Based on a Cox proportional hazard model we estimated mortality rate ratios and associated 95% CIs comparing mortality rates between patients by bone metastasis with and without skeletal related events, adjusting for age and comorbidity. RESULTS: Of the patients 569 (almost 3%) presented with bone metastasis at prostate cancer diagnosis, of whom 248 (43.6%) experienced a skeletal related event during followup. Of the 22,404 men (97% overall) without bone metastasis at diagnosis 2,578 (11.5%) were diagnosed with bone metastasis and 1,329 (5.9%) also experienced a skeletal related event during followup. One and 5-year survival was 87% and 56% in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastasis, 47% and 3% in those with bone metastasis, and 40% and less than 1% in those with bone metastasis and skeletal related events, respectively. Compared with men with prostate cancer without bone metastasis the adjusted 1-year mortality rate ratio was 4.7 (95% CI 4.3-5.2) in those with bone metastasis and no skeletal related events, and 6.6 (95% CI 5.9-7.5) in those with bone metastasis and a skeletal related event. CONCLUSIONS: Bone metastasis and skeletal related events predict poor prognosis in men with prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
20483155 View in PubMed
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Skin cancer risk among solid organ recipients: a nationwide cohort study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100443
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Sep;90(5):474-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Annette Ostergaard Jensen
Claus Svaerke
Dora Farkas
Lars Pedersen
Knud Kragballe
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Dernmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Sep;90(5):474-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Heart Transplantation - adverse effects
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Liver Diseases - epidemiology
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Lung Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Organ Transplantation - adverse effects
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study assessed the risk of skin cancer following transplantation of 4 types of solid organs, and the risk of skin cancer in patients with chronic diseases that lead to organ transplantations. A population-based cohort of 5279 Danish patients who underwent heart, lung, renal and liver transplantation, and 77,782 patients with chronic heart, lung, renal and liver diseases during 1977-2006 were included in the study. Linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry allowed complete follow-up for basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The SIR for squamous cell carcinoma was highest among heart (SIR = 113; 95% CI: 74-166), then renal (SIR = 81; 95% CI: 68-96), lung (SIR = 65; 95% CI: 28-128) and liver (SIR = 60; 95% CI: 27-113) recipients. SIR for squamous cell carcinoma was 4.8 (95% CI: 2.2-9.0) among renal failure patients, but not greatly elevated among patients with the other chronic diseases studied. Organ transplantation is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, with immunosuppressive treatments being the most likely explanation for the association.
Notes
RefSource: Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Sep;90(5):450-3
PubMed ID
20814621 View in PubMed
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Survival in breast cancer patients with bone metastases and skeletal-related events: a population-based cohort study in Denmark (1999-2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135623
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 Sep;129(2):495-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Mellissa Yong
Annette Östergaard Jensen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Mette Nørgaard
Jon P Fryzek
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc, One Amgen Center Drive, MS: 24-2-A, Thousand Oaks, CA, 91320, USA. myong@amgen.com
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 Sep;129(2):495-503
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - complications - mortality - secondary - therapy
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - etiology - mortality
Humans
Hypercalcemia - etiology - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Neoplasm Staging
Orthopedic Procedures - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiotherapy - mortality
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Compression - etiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone lesions as a consequence of bone metastases in breast cancer patients can increase risk for skeletal-related events (SREs) (i.e., radiation to the bone, a pathological or osteoporotic fracture event, hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression, or surgery to the bone). The mortality risk for breast cancer patients with SREs subsequent to bone metastases is unclear. We assessed this relationship in a large, population-based cohort of breast cancer patients in Denmark. We identified 35,912 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2007 in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) and followed them through April 1, 2008. Information on stage and treatment was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate survival, and Cox's regression analysis to estimate the mortality rate ratio (MRR) by the presence of bone metastases with and without SREs, adjusting for age and comorbidity. The 5-year survival was 75.8% for breast cancer patients without bone metastases, 8.3% for patients with bone metastases, and 2.5% for those with both bone metastases and SREs. The adjusted MRR was 10.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 9.5-11.6] for breast cancer patients with bone metastases, and 14.4 (95% CI 13.1-15.8) for those with bone metastases and SREs, compared with breast cancer patients with no bone metastases but possibly other sites of metastases. A similar pattern persisted when analyses were stratified by stage or treatment. Breast cancer patients with bone metastases and SREs have a poor prognosis compared to those with and without bone metastases regardless of cancer treatment or stage of disease at diagnosis.
PubMed ID
21461730 View in PubMed
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