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Characteristics of community-based occupational therapy: Results of a norwegian survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309551
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2020 Jan; 27(1):39-46
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Tore Bonsaksen
Anne-Stine Dolva
Sissel Horghagen
Unni Sveen
Cathrine Hagby
Cathrine Arntzen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Prosthetics and Orthotics, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2020 Jan; 27(1):39-46
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Self-Help Devices
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Background: Ongoing changes in healthcare delivery systems in Norway increasingly require community-based services, and the changes will likely affect the working conditions and opportunities for occupational therapists.Aim: To characterize occupational therapy in community-based practice in Norway.Material and methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was applied using a questionnaire related to personal and organizational characteristics. Participants (n?=?561) were recruited among community-working occupational therapists in Norway registered as members of Ergoterapeutene. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics.Results: The majority of the participants was female and had an average of 16.5 years of professional experience. They reported to spend about half of their working hours on direct work with clients. For many, work with assistive technology was a main task, accounting for approximately half their working hours. Only a small proportion worked in municipalities that had merged with others, but for a larger proportion (27%) a merger had been decided and was in preparation.Conclusion: This study established some basic information regarding Norwegian community-based occupational therapy and the municipalities where occupational therapists work.Significance: With this study serving as a baseline, we may be able to track how changes will affect community-based occupational therapy practice in the near future.
PubMed ID
31032684 View in PubMed
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Friendships and patterns of social leisure participation among Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310589
Source
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2019 Sep; 32(5):1184-1193
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Anne-Stine Dolva
Marit Kollstad
Jo Kleiven
Author Affiliation
Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
Source
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2019 Sep; 32(5):1184-1193
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Down Syndrome
Family
Female
Friends
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Leisure Activities
Male
Norway
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
A first generation of adolescents with Down syndrome have grown up in Norway's inclusive society. This study explored their friendships and social leisure participation, mainly as it is reflected through their subjective experience.
The analysis is based on qualitative interviews and observations of 22 teens aged 17 years.
Generally, the adolescents described their social life as rich and varied, occurring in several contexts with different companions. Their thoughts of friendships were quite extensive, also including less close relationships. Three main contextual patterns of social participation were revealed: (a) the family at home pattern, (b) the peer group pattern and (c) the arranged company pattern. The relationship between the national policy on social inclusion and these findings is discussed.
To understand the barriers and opportunities in the social life of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome, it is essential to acknowledge the extent of their experiences with friendship and the characteristics of their social participation patterns.
PubMed ID
31038247 View in PubMed
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Functional performance in children with Down syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30010
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2004 Nov-Dec;58(6):621-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anne-Stine Dolva
Wendy Coster
Margareta Lilja
Author Affiliation
Lillehammer University College, N-2626 Lillehammer, Norway. anne-stine.dolva@hil.no
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2004 Nov-Dec;58(6):621-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Language Development Disorders - rehabilitation
Male
Norway
Occupational Therapy - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care - psychology
Social Environment
Toilet Training
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe home and community functional performance in 5-year-old children with Down syndrome. METHOD: In a cross-sectional study of 5-year-old children with Down syndrome in Norway (N=43), functional performance was measured with the Norwegian translation of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Additional descriptive information related to health, disabilities, and function was also gathered. RESULTS: The children showed a wide range of functional performance. Performance of self-care activities appeared most delayed on activities that required fine motor skills. Children appeared less affected in basic functional mobility skills. Parents' identified their main concerns as language functioning and, for the children not yet toilet trained, the management of bladder and bowel control in relation to starting school. CONCLUSION: The results provide baseline information regarding typical levels of functional performance in children with Down syndrome at 5 years of age. However, the broad range of functional performance across children indicates a need for caution in generalizing the results to an individual child.
PubMed ID
15568546 View in PubMed
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Normative Scores for the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278180
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2016;36(2):131-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Marie M Berg
Anne-Stine Dolva
Jo Kleiven
Lena Krumlinde-Sundholm
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2016;36(2):131-43
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Children
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pediatrics - methods
Reference Values
Severity of Illness Index
United States
Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop clinically useful normative scores for the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) for children in Norway, and provide information on the relative difficulty level of individual test items.
Using PEDI protocols from 224 Norwegian children without disability, we computed and scrutinized the normative scores for their representativeness, and compared them with scores from 313 children in the original US PEDI sample. Item functioning was compared using Rasch model-based differential item functioning (DIF) analyses and comparisons of item mastery.
The normative scores yielded consistent and regular results. The mean scores for each age group in the Norwegian sample were lower than in their US counterparts, and age mean plots ran parallel. However, this difference may be misleading for clinical use, as item comparisons revealed differences in both higher and lower directions between the samples for about a third of all items. Estimates of relative item difficulty for children in Norway were developed.
Identifying potential differences when using an instrument in another culture is important to avoid a risk of over- or underestimating a child's capability. In addition, item response patterns are required to make national normative scores clinically useful.
PubMed ID
26325620 View in PubMed
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