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Atopic dermatitis in young children: diagnostic criteria for use in epidemiological studies based on telephone interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30654
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2003;83(5):347-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Christine Stabell Benn
Eva Benfeldt
Per Kragh Andersen
Anne Braae Olesen
Mads Melbye
Bengt Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology, Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. cb@ssi.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2003;83(5):347-50
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Interviews - standards
Patient Selection
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of the study was to establish diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis in 1.5-year-old children that could be employed in epidemiological studies of atopic dermatitis based on telephone interviews. In a Danish cohort of 100,000 pregnant women, 4 computer-assisted telephone interviews were carried out. In the last interview, conducted when the child was 1.5 years old, mothers were asked about their child's skin condition. Eighty-one women who had answered that their child suffered from either an itchy rash or atopic dermatitis were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 60 took part in the study and had their child examined by a dermatologist. Affirmative answers to 1) itchy rash or doctor-verified atopic dermatitis and 2) recurrent rash or rash for at least 4 consecutive 0.5-month periods, and 3) localization in elbow creases, behind the knees, wrists/hands, face or generalized rash resulted in the highest sensitivity and specificity for atopic dermatitis as diagnosed by the dermatologist, who found 37 of 60 children (62%) suffering from atopic dermatitis. Using this algorithm, telephone interviews can be used to diagnose atopic dermatitis in young children in large-scale epidemiological investigations.
PubMed ID
14609101 View in PubMed
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Atopic dermatitis is increased following vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella or measles infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30603
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2003;83(6):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Anne Braae Olesen
Svend Juul
Kristian Thestrup-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark. AnneBraae@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2003;83(6):445-50
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prevalence
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
The prevalence of atopic dermatitis increased markedly in the period 1960s to the 1990s. Earlier findings indicate that infections acquired in early life enhance or suppress the expression of atopic disease as a result of a change in immune reactivity. Our objectives were to examine the association between measles, mumps and rubella vaccination, measles infection and the risk of atopic dermatitis. A random sample of 9,744 children were followed up from birth to 3-15 years. Their parents responded to a questionnaire including highly structured questions on atopic dermatitis, measles, mumps and rubella vaccination and measles infection. Information on parental educational level was obtained from Statistics Denmark. The cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at age 14 was 19.7%. The confounder adjusted incidence ratio of atopic dermatitis among measles, mumps and rubella vaccinated children versus children not subjected to measles, mumps and rubella vaccination and measles infection was 1.86 (95% CI 1.25-2.79); the incidence ratio for measles-infected children was similar. The incidence of atopic dermatitis increased after measles, mumps and rubella vaccination and measles infection, which is surprising in view of the hygiene hypothesis. We suggest further study of the possible short-term and long-term effects of virus and bacteria on the immune responses and expression of atopic disease.
PubMed ID
14690341 View in PubMed
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[Clinical database for non-melanoma skin cancer].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119697
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 15;174(42):2546
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2012

The incidence of metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC) in Denmark, 1997-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277084
Source
Eur J Dermatol. 2015 Sep-Oct;25(5):463-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary Nguyen-Nielsen
Lisa Wang
Lars Pedersen
Anne Braae Olesen
Jeannie Hou
Howard Mackey
Margaret McCusker
Nicole Basset-Seguin
Jon Fryzek
Mogens Vyberg
Source
Eur J Dermatol. 2015 Sep-Oct;25(5):463-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness - pathology
Neoplasm Metastasis - pathology
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Few data exist on the occurrence of metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC).
To identify all cases of mBCC in Denmark over a 14-year period.
We searched the Danish National Patient Registry covering all Danish hospitals, the Danish Cancer Registry, the National Pathology Registry and the Causes of Death Registry during the period 1997 to 2010 for potential cases of mBCC registered according to the International classification of diseases ICD-10 and the International Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED).
We identified 126,627 patients with a history of primary basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the registries during the 14-year study period. Using case identifications from the four registries, a total of 170 potential mBCC cases were identified. However, after a pathology review, only five cases could be confirmed, of which three were basosquamous carcinomas. The 14-year cumulative incidence proportion of mBCC was 0.0039% (95% CI 0.0016-0.0083) among individuals with a history of previous BCC (n = 126,627) and 0.0001% (95% CI 0.0000-0.0002) in the general population.
MBCC is a rare disease and only a small proportion of potential cases identified in automated clinical databases or registries can be confirmed by pathology and medical record review.
PubMed ID
26105129 View in PubMed
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[Modernization of dermato-veneorology education].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136468
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Mar 7;173(10):728
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-2011
Author
Eva Benfeldt
Anne Braae Olesen
Author Affiliation
Dermato-allergologisk Afdeling K/A 1502, Gentofte Hospital, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. benfeldt@post5.tele.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Mar 7;173(10):728
Date
Mar-7-2011
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Dermatology - education
Humans
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
PubMed ID
21375987 View in PubMed
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Mortality in cancer patients with a history of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma--a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125720
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:126
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir
Timothy L Lash
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Anne Braae Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. saj@dce.au.dk
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:126
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
Rectal Neoplasms - mortality
Skin Neoplasms - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is associated with underlying immunosuppression, so it may be a prognostic marker in patients with subsequent cancer. We therefore conducted a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study to evaluate whether a history of cutaneuos SCC has prognostic impact in patients with one of the following index cancers: non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), or cancer of the lung, colon, rectum, breast, or prostate.
We used Danish medical databases, which cover the entire Danish population of 5.6 million inhabitants and linked them using the unique personal identification number assigned to all Danish residents. From 1982 through 2003, we identified 745 index cancer patients with and 79,143 without previous cutaneous SCC. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we calculated adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Overall, previous SCC was associated with an increased mortality of cancer (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04-1.23). When examining index cancers separately, increased MRRs were found for cancer of the lung (MRR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05-1.43), colon (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92-1.40), rectum (MRR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67), breast (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.82-1.43), and NHL (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.81-1.47), but not for prostate cancer (MRR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83-1.18).
Our results suggest that previous cutaneous SCC is associated with poor prognosis of some cancers. This finding stresses the importance of adherence to the existing recommendations of screening, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer in patients with a history of SCC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22458954 View in PubMed
Less detail

Non-melanoma skin cancer and ten-year all-cause mortality: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96570
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Annette Østergaard Jensen
Anna Lei Lamberg
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Anne Braae Olesen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):362-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Confounding from comorbidity and socioeconomic status may have biased earlier findings of all-cause mortality among patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We therefore examined all-cause mortality among 72,295 Danish patients with BCC, 11,601 with SCC, and 383,714 age- and gender-matched population control cohort subjects with extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status. Data on cancer, death, and socioeconomic status were obtained from medical databases and Statistics Denmark. We analysed data using Cox regression analysis, with estimation of 10-year mortality rate ratios (MRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Mortality was reduced among patients with BCC (10-year MRR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.89-0.92) and did not vary by age, comorbidity, or socioeconomic status. Mortality among patients with SCC was increased and varied by age, selected chronic diseases, but not socioeconomic status. The reduced mortality observed among patients with BCC and the increased mortality among patients with SCC persisted even after extensive control for comorbidity and socioeconomic status.
PubMed ID
20574600 View in PubMed
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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of skin cancer: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123945
Source
Cancer. 2012 Oct 1;118(19):4768-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2012
Author
Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir
Ellen T Chang
Frank Mehnert
Morten Schmidt
Anne Braae Olesen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. saj@dce.au.dk
Source
Cancer. 2012 Oct 1;118(19):4768-76
Date
Oct-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent the development of cancer by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in carcinogenesis. Therefore, the authors of this report examined the association between NSAID use and the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and malignant melanoma (MM).
From 1991 through 2009, all incident cases of SCC (n = 1974), BCC (n = 13,316), and MM (n = 3242) in northern Denmark were identified. Approximately 10 population controls (n = 178,655) were matched to each case by age, gender, and county of residence. The use of aspirin, other nonselective NSAIDs, or selective COX-2 inhibitors was ascertained through a prescription database. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted for potential confounders were used to compute odds ratios as estimates of incidence rate ratios (IRRs).
For NSAIDs overall, ever use (>2 prescriptions) compared with nonuse (=2 prescriptions) was associated with a decreased risk of SCC (IRR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.94) and MM (IRR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95), especially for long-term use (=7 years) and high-intensity use (>25% prescription coverage during the total duration of use). NSAID use was not associated with a reduced risk of BCC overall (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-1.01), but the risk of BCC at sites other than the head and neck was reduced in association with long-term use (IRR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.95) and high-intensity use (IRR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.91). All estimates of reduced risk were driven primarily by the use of nonselective NSAIDs and older COX-2 inhibitors (diclofenac, etodolac, and meloxicam).
The current results indicated that NSAID use may decrease the risk of SCC and MM.
Notes
Comment In: Cancer. 2013 Apr 1;119(7):144623065936
PubMed ID
22644960 View in PubMed
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The risk of cancer among patients previously hospitalized for atopic dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16824
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2005 Sep;125(3):445-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Anne Braae Olesen
Gerda Engholm
Hans Henrik Storm
Kristian Thestrup-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
The Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark. Annebraae@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2005 Sep;125(3):445-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - drug therapy
Drug Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
In treatment of severe atopic dermatitis, drugs with carcinogenic potentials are used to manage the disease. We therefore analyzed whether patients having severe atopic eczema had an increased cancer risk. The study population included all individuals hospitalized in Denmark with a primary diagnosis of atopic dermatitis during 1977-1996. Follow-up was conducted in 1996 in the Danish Cancer Register. A total of 6275 persons were included. Among 2030 adult patients, an increased risk of cancer was observed, standard morbidity ratio (SMR)=1.5 (95% CI: 1.2-1.9). Half the excess cases of cancer was keratinocyte carcinomas of the skin diagnosed within the first 9 y of follow-up, SMR=2.4 (95% CI: 1.4-3.9). For men, SMR=2.7 (95%CI: 1.2-5.4). In conclusion, earlier hospitalized adult atopic dermatitis patients had an increased risk of cancer. Half the excess cases of cancer were keratinocyte carcinomas. This may be a result of a detection bias or due to the carcinogenic potentials of some of the therapies of severe atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
16117783 View in PubMed
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[Silica exposure and the risk of systemic sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116151
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Feb 18;175(8):501-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2013
Author
Anne Troldborg
Berit Dalsgaard Nielsen
Henrik Albert Kolstad
Anne Braae Olesen
Klaus Henrik Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Reumatologisk Afdeling, Aarhus Universitetshospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. atroldborg@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Feb 18;175(8):501-3
Date
Feb-18-2013
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Critical Pathways
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hand - pathology
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Scleroderma, Systemic - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
The aetiology of systemic sclerosis (Ssc) is unknown, but there is evidence of environmental factors playing a part in disease development in a number of cases. By examining a group of male patients with Ssc we found significant exposure to silica in 26% (6/23) of the patients compared to 2,1% in the general working population in Denmark. In the article we review the association between silica and Ssc and suggest how to question and refer patients with SSc who are suspected to have been exposed to silica.
PubMed ID
23428266 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.