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Acculturation and self-rated health among Arctic indigenous peoples: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119199
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:948
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bent-Martin Eliassen
Tonje Braaten
Marita Melhus
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Centre for Sami Health Research, University of Tromsø, Tromsø N-9037, Norway. bent-martin.eliassen@uit.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:948
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Groups - psychology
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acculturation is for indigenous peoples related to the process of colonisation over centuries as well as the on-going social transition experienced in the Arctic today. Changing living conditions and lifestyle affect health in numerous ways in Arctic indigenous populations. Self-rated health (SRH) is a relevant variable in primary health care and in general public health assessments and monitoring. Exploring the relationship between acculturation and SRH in indigenous populations having experienced great societal and cultural change is thus of great importance.
The principal method in the Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA) was standardised face-to-face interviews using a questionnaire. Very high overall participation rates of 83% were obtained in Greenland and Alaska, whilst a more conventional rate of 57% was achieved in Norway. Acculturation was conceptualised as certain traditional subsistence activities being of lesser importance for people's ethnic identity, and poorer spoken indigenous language ability (SILA). Acculturation was included in six separate gender- and country-specific ordinal logistic regressions to assess qualitative effects on SRH.
Multivariable analyses showed that acculturation significantly predicted poorer SRH in Greenland. An increased subsistence score gave an OR of 2.32 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23127197 View in PubMed
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Changes in conventional cardiovascular risk factors and the estimated 10-year risk of acute myocardial infarction or cerebral stroke in Sami and non-Sami populations in two population-based cross-sectional surveys: the SAMINOR Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302002
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 Jul 19; 9(7):e028939
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-19-2019
Author
Susanna Ragnhild Andersdatter Siri
Bent Martin Eliassen
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Marita Melhus
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Vilde Lehne Michalsen
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 9037, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 Jul 19; 9(7):e028939
Date
Jul-19-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To describe changes in cardiovascular risk factors and in the estimated 10-year risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or cerebral stroke (CS) between SAMINOR 1 (2003-2004) and SAMINOR 2 (2012-2014), and explore if these changes differed between Sami and non-Sami.
Two cross-sectional surveys.
Inhabitants of rural Northern Norway.
Participants were aged 40-79 years and participated in SAMINOR 1 (n=6417) and/or SAMINOR 2 (n=5956).
Generalised estimating equation regressions with an interaction term were used to estimate and compare changes in cardiovascular risk factors and 10-year risk of AMI or CS between the two surveys and by ethnicity.
Mean cholesterol declined by 0.50, 0.43 and 0.60?mmol/L in women, Sami men and non-Sami men, respectively (all p
PubMed ID
31326934 View in PubMed
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A descriptive study of ten-year longitudinal changes in weight and waist circumference in the multi-ethnic rural Northern Norway. The SAMINOR Study, 2003-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306874
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229234
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Marita Melhus
Kirsti Kvaløy
Susanna R A Siri
Vilde Lehne Michalsen
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229234
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Population Groups
Prognosis
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The obesity epidemic is dynamic with varying secular trends and differences between countries and ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to describe the age- and sex-specific longitudinal changes in weight and waist circumference in a rural Norwegian population with a high proportion of the indigenous Sami population. Based on two population-based surveys, SAMINOR 1 (2003-2004) and SAMINOR 2 (2012-2014), we present longitudinal changes in weight and waist circumference according to age at baseline in the SAMINOR 1 Survey and sex during the 10-year period. The analyses included 1538 men and 1958 women aged 36 to 69 at baseline (birth year 1934 to 1967). Forty-one percent of the population were Sami. Both weight and waist circumference were measured. The mean weight increased 0.8 kg (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 1.1) in men and 0.3 kg (95% confidence interval: 0, 0.5) in women. In both men and women, younger individuals gained significantly more weight during the 10-year follow-up than older participants (p
PubMed ID
32074126 View in PubMed
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Design and methods in a survey of living conditions in the Arctic - the SLiCA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125769
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:17229
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bent-Martin Eliassen
Marita Melhus
Jack Kruse
Birger Poppel
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Centre for Sami Health Research, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. bent-martin.eliassen@uit.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:17229
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Cohort Studies
Female
Greenland
Health Services, Indigenous
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Housing - standards
Humans
Inuits - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Research Design
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objective of this study is to describe the methods and design of the survey of living conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA), relevant participation rates and the distribution of participants, as applicable to the survey data in Alaska, Greenland and Norway. This article briefly addresses possible selection bias in the data and also the ways to tackle it in future studies.
Population-based cross-sectional survey.
Indigenous individuals aged 16 years and older, living in Greenland, Alaska and in traditional settlement areas in Norway, were invited to participate. Random sampling methods were applied in Alaska and Greenland, while non-probability sampling methods were applied in Norway. Data were collected in 3 periods: in Alaska, from January 2002 to February 2003; in Greenland, from December 2003 to August 2006; and in Norway, in 2003 and from June 2006 to June 2008. The principal method in SLiCA was standardised face-to-face interviews using a questionnaire.
A total of 663, 1,197 and 445 individuals were interviewed in Alaska, Greenland and Norway, respectively. Very high overall participation rates of 83% were obtained in Greenland and Alaska, while a more conventional rate of 57% was achieved in Norway. A predominance of female respondents was obtained in Alaska. Overall, the Sami cohort is older than the cohorts from Greenland and Alaska.
Preliminary assessments suggest that selection bias in the Sami sample is plausible but not a major threat. Few or no threats to validity are detected in the data from Alaska and Greenland. Despite different sampling and recruitment methods, and sociocultural differences, a unique database has been generated, which shall be used to explore relationships between health and other living conditions variables.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22456042 View in PubMed
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Disordered eating in Sami and non-Sami Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287602
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec 10;:1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2017
Author
Kirsti Kvaløy
Marita Melhus
Anne Silviken
Magritt Brustad
Tore Sørlie
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec 10;:1-12
Date
Dec-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate disordered eating (DE) among Sami compared with non-Sami residing in northern Norway.
In a cross-sectional design, stratified by sex and ethnicity, associations were tested between DE (Eating Disturbance Scale; EDS-5) and age, education level, BMI category, anxiety and depression, physical activity and consumption of snacks.
The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) based on the population of ten municipalities in northern Norway.
Adults aged 40-69 years; 1811 Sami (844 male, 967 female) compared with 2578 non-Sami (1180 male, 1398 female) individuals.
No overall significant ethnic difference in DE was identified, although comfort eating was reported more often by Sami individuals (P=0·01). Regardless of ethnicity and sex, symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with DE (P
PubMed ID
29223188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disordered eating in Sami and non-Sami Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Kirsti Kvaløy
Marita Melhus
Anne Silviken
Magritt Brustad
Tore Sørlie
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
1Centre for Sami Health Research,Department of Community Medicine,UiT The Arctic University of Norway,9037 Tromsø,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Exercise
Feeding and Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate disordered eating (DE) among Sami compared with non-Sami residing in northern Norway.
In a cross-sectional design, stratified by sex and ethnicity, associations were tested between DE (Eating Disturbance Scale; EDS-5) and age, education level, BMI category, anxiety and depression, physical activity and consumption of snacks.
The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) based on the population of ten municipalities in northern Norway.
Adults aged 40-69 years; 1811 Sami (844 male, 967 female) compared with 2578 non-Sami (1180 male, 1398 female) individuals.
No overall significant ethnic difference in DE was identified, although comfort eating was reported more often by Sami individuals (P=0·01). Regardless of ethnicity and sex, symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with DE (P
PubMed ID
29223188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disparities amidst plenty: a health portrait of Indigenous peoples in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304819
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1805254
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
T Kue Young
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Yury A Sumarokov
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta , Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1805254
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This paper describes the extent and variation in health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people within Alaska, Greenland and the northern regions of Canada, Russia and the Nordic countries. We accessed official health statistics and reviewed research studies. We selected a few indicators of health status, health determinants and health care to demonstrate the health disparities that exist. For a large number of health indicators Indigenous people fare worse than non-Indigenous people in the same region or nationally, with the exception of the Sami in the Nordic countries whose health profiles are similar to their non-Sami neighbours. That we were unable to produce a uniform set of indicators applicable to all regions is indicative of the large knowledge gaps that exist. The need for ongoing health monitoring for Indigenous people is most acute for the Sami and Russia, less so for Canada, and least for Alaska, where health data specific to Alaska Natives are generally available. It is difficult to produce an overarching explanatory model for health disparities that is applicable to all regions. We need to seek explanation in the broader political, cultural and societal contexts within which Indigenous people live in their respective regions.
PubMed ID
32865150 View in PubMed
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The effect of referral templates on out-patient quality of care in a hospital setting: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285526
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Mar 07;17(1):177
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-07-2017
Author
Henrik Wåhlberg
Per Christian Valle
Siri Malm
Øistein Hovde
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Mar 07;17(1):177
Date
Mar-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - standards
Chest Pain - therapy
Cluster analysis
Colorectal Neoplasms - therapy
Dyspepsia - therapy
Female
General Practice - standards
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - therapy
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care - standards
Referral and Consultation - standards
Abstract
The assessment of quality of care is an integral part of modern medicine. The referral represents the handing over of care from the general practitioner to the specialist. This study aimed to assess whether an improved referral could lead to improved quality of care.
A cluster randomized trial with the general practitioner surgery as the clustering unit was performed. Fourteen surgeries in the area surrounding the University Hospital of North Norway Harstad were randomized stratified by town versus countryside location. The intervention consisted of implementing referral templates for new referrals in four clinical areas: dyspepsia; suspected colorectal cancer; chest pain; and confirmed or suspected chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The control group followed standard referral practice. Quality of treatment pathway as assessed by newly developed quality indicators was used as main outcome. Secondary outcomes included subjective quality assessment, positive predictive value of referral and adequacy of prioritization. Assessment of outcomes was done at the individual level. The patients, hospital doctors and outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention status.
A total of 500 patients were included, with 281 in the intervention and 219 in the control arm. From the multilevel regression model the effect of the intervention on the quality indicator score was insignificant at 1.80% (95% CI, -1.46 to 5.06, p?=?0.280). No significant differences between the intervention and the control groups were seen in the secondary outcomes. Active use of the referral intervention was low, estimated at approximately 50%. There was also wide variation in outcome scoring between the different assessors.
In this study no measurable effect on quality of care or prioritization was revealed after implementation of referral templates at the general practitioner/hospital interface. The results were hindered by a limited uptake of the intervention at GP surgeries and inconsistencies in outcome assessment.
The study was registered under registration number NCT01470963 on September 5th, 2011.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28270128 View in PubMed
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Estimated 8-year cumulative incidence of diabetes mellitus among Sami and non-Sami inhabitants of Northern Norway - The SAMINOR Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301294
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2019 Jun 24; 19(1):66
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-24-2019
Author
Ali Naseribafrouei
Bent Martin Eliassen
Marita Melhus
Johan Svartberg
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Box 6050 Langnes, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway. ali.naseribafrouei@uit.no.
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2019 Jun 24; 19(1):66
Date
Jun-24-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The aim of the study was to estimate and compare the 8-year cumulative incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among Sami and non-Sami inhabitants of rural districts in Northern Norway.
Longitudinal study based on linkage of two cross-sectional surveys, the SAMINOR 1 Survey (2003-2004) and the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014). Ten municipalities in rural Northern Norway were included in the study. DM-free participants aged 30 and 36-71?years in SAMINOR 1 were followed from 2 years after SAMINOR 1 to attendance in SAMINOR 2. The average follow-up time was 8.1?years. Of 5875 subjects who had participated in SAMINOR 1 and could potentially be followed to SAMINOR 2, 3303 were included in the final analysis. Self-reported DM and/or HbA1c?=?6.5% were used to identify incident cases of DM.
At baseline, body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were higher among Sami than among their non-Sami counterparts. After 8?years of follow-up, 201 incident cases of DM were identified (6.1% both Sami and non-Sami subjects). No statistically significant difference was observed in the cumulative incidence of DM between the Sami and non-Sami.
No statistically significant difference in the 8-year cumulative incidence of DM among Sami and non-Sami was observed, although Sami men and women had higher baseline BMI and WHtR.
PubMed ID
31234837 View in PubMed
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Ethnic difference in the prevalence of angina pectoris in Sami and non-Sami populations: the SAMINOR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261930
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Bent-Martin Eliassen
Sidsel Graff-Iversen
Marita Melhus
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - ethnology
Prevalence
Public Health
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To assess the population burden of angina pectoris symptoms (APS), self-reported angina and a combination of these, and explore potential ethnic disparity in their patterns. If differences in APS were found between Sami and non-Sami populations, we aimed at evaluating the role of established cardiovascular risk factors as mediating factors.
Cross-sectional population-based study.
A health survey was conducted in 2003-2004 in areas with Sami and non-Sami populations (SAMINOR). The response rate was 60.9%. The total number for the subsequent analysis was 15,206 men and women aged 36-79 years (born 1925-1968). Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 self-administrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided data on waist circumference, blood pressure and lipid levels.
This study revealed an excess of APS, self-reported angina and a combination of these in Sami relative to non-Sami women and men. After controlling for age, the odds ratio (OR) for APS was 1.42 (p
Notes
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