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Adolescents' own suggestions for bullying interventions at age 13 and 16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98941
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2010
Author
Ann Frisén
Kristina Holmqvist
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Date
Apr-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Age Factors
Attitude
Empathy
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In this study we examined adolescents' perspectives on what interventions they consider to be effective in order to stop the bullying of a student. The adolescents' suggestions were reviewed at two time points, age 13 and 16. Participants were 474 girls and 403 boys at the first point of examination, and 429 girls and 332 boys at the second point of examination. The participants' suggestions were divided into categories based on some of the anti-bullying strategies commonly presented by researchers. Results showed that some anti-bullying strategies were more salient than others in the adolescents' suggestions, and that their suggestions differed as a function of age, sex and to some extent, current experience of victimization. Having serious talks with the students involved was among the most common suggestions at both ages. However, girls were more likely than boys, and non-victims were more likely than victims, to suggest this particular strategy.
PubMed ID
19674402 View in PubMed
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Appearance-related cyberbullying: a qualitative investigation of characteristics, content, reasons, and effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265219
Source
Body Image. 2014 Sep;11(4):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sofia Berne
Ann Frisén
Johanna Kling
Source
Body Image. 2014 Sep;11(4):527-33
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Depression - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore 15-year-old adolescents' experiences of appearance-related cyberbullying. Twenty-seven adolescents participated in four focus groups. The adolescents in this study perceived that it is common to be targeted in appearance-related cyberbullying, especially for girls, and that appearance-related cyberbullying is considered to be a potent strategy when attempting to hurt girls. Girls often received comments about being fat, while among boys, it was common to receive comments about looking or seeming "gay." According to the adolescents, an important reason for engaging in appearance-related cyberbullying was to attain higher social status in the peer group. The girls and boys reacted differently to appearance-related cyberbullying. Boys tended to act out or take no offence, while girls experienced lower self-esteem and feelings of depression. Findings in this study contribute to research on cyberbullying as well as to research on girls' body esteem development.
PubMed ID
25194309 View in PubMed
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Changes in 10-year-old children's body esteem: a time-lag study between 2000 and 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261902
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2014 Apr;55(2):123-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Ann Frisén
Linda Anneheden
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2014 Apr;55(2):123-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Overweight - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
This time-lag study examined if there has been any changes in body esteem over a 10-year period for 10-year old children in Gothenburg, Sweden. Two cohorts of children, one in year 2000 and one in 2010, answered the same questionnaire about body esteem. A total of 960 children, 515 girls and 445 boys, participated in the first wave in 2000 and a total of 342 children, 171 girls and 171 boys participated in the second wave in 2010. The results showed a general stability in levels of body esteem for both girls and boys over the past 10 years. The gender differences, with boys being more satisfied with their appearance and weight compared to girls also seems to be stable over the years. In addition, the results also showed a somewhat positive development among the overweight girls with enhanced body esteem for the overweight girls compared to the non-overweight girls during the ten years studied. Unfortunately, the same pattern was not found for overweight boys. For them the discrepancy in body esteem compared to non-overweight boys, with the overweight boys being more dissatisfied, found in 2000 remained in 2010.
PubMed ID
24646044 View in PubMed
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Embodiment: Cultural and gender differences and associations with life satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312012
Source
Body Image. 2020 Dec; 35:1-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Kristina Holmqvist Gattario
Ann Frisén
Tanya Luanne Teall
Niva Piran
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: kristina.holmqvist@psy.gu.se.
Source
Body Image. 2020 Dec; 35:1-10
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Feeding and Eating Disorders - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Self Concept
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Although cultural factors have an important impact on individuals' experiences of living in their bodies, to date no studies have examined cross-cultural or gender differences in individuals' experience of embodiment. This study compared Swedish and Canadian women's experience of embodiment (and other body image related constructs), as well as Swedish men and women's experience of embodiment. Associations between embodiment, body esteem, and life satisfaction in men and women were also examined. Participants were 302 Swedish women, 242 Swedish men, and 216 Canadian women. Results showed that Swedish women had overall more positive experience of embodiment, more positive body esteem, lower thin-ideal internalization and lower levels of disordered eating than Canadian women. In comparison to Swedish men, however, Swedish women had more negative experience of embodiment in some ways, but similar experience of embodiment in other ways. Although associations between embodiment, body esteem, and life satisfaction were strong, embodiment was a better predictor of life satisfaction than body esteem for both men and women. Results are interpreted through the lens of the developmental theory of embodiment and consider cultural differences between Sweden and Canada, as well as Swedish society's both progress and problems in promoting gender equity.
PubMed ID
32877841 View in PubMed
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Internalization as a mediator of the relationship between conformity to masculine norms and body image attitudes and behaviors among young men in Sweden, US, UK, and Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275812
Source
Body Image. 2015 Sep;15:54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Debra L Franko
Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz
Rachel F Rodgers
Kristina Holmqvist Gattario
Ann Frisén
Phillippa C Diedrichs
Lina A Ricciardelli
Zali Yager
Linda Smolak
Heather Thompson-Brenner
Rebecca M Shingleton
Source
Body Image. 2015 Sep;15:54-60
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Australia
Body Composition
Body Image - psychology
Great Britain
Health Behavior
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Muscle strength
Personal Satisfaction
Sweden
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined whether internalization of sociocultural body ideals mediated the relationship between conformity to masculine norms and drive for muscularity, leanness, and thinness in a sample of males from Sweden, US, UK, and Australia. Over six hundred young men [n=142 (Sweden); n=192 (US); n=141 (UK); n=160 (Australia)] completed an online survey that included assessments of masculine role norms, body image, and internalization of sociocultural body ideals. Path analyses confirmed internalization as a mediator between greater conformity to masculine norms and body image measures (drive for thinness, desire for leanness, and desire for muscularity) across the sample. However, significant cross-country differences in the strength of these mediation effects were found. Mediation effects among US, Australian, and Swedish males were comparable, whereas these effects were weaker in the UK sample. Findings confirmed the importance of internalization of sociocultural body ideals in the tested models.
PubMed ID
26160708 View in PubMed
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On being victimized by peers in the advent of adolescence: prospective relationships to objectified body consciousness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133788
Source
Body Image. 2011 Sep;8(4):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Carolina Lunde
Ann Frisén
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. carolina.lunde@psy.gu.se
Source
Body Image. 2011 Sep;8(4):309-14
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention
Awareness
Body Image
Bullying
Child
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
Previous research indicates that peer victimization is tied to children's negative appearance evaluations. The current study examines whether early peer victimization is also prospectively related to objectified body consciousness. Six-hundred-and-two Swedish boys and girls answered questionnaires at age 10, and again at age 18. Main findings showed that being the target of peer victimization at age 10 was related to more habitual appearance monitoring and body shame at age 18. Gender moderated the relations between victimization and body shame, with victimized girls experiencing stronger body shame than victimized boys. Additionally, whereas boys experienced less body shame than girls, they were equally likely to monitor their appearance. In sum, this study provides preliminary support to the notion that peer victimization is involved in the processes by which young adolescents' self-objectify. Future studies are warranted to further validate these findings.
PubMed ID
21664888 View in PubMed
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Swedish 18-year-olds' identity formation: associations with feelings about appearance and internalization of body ideals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115337
Source
J Adolesc. 2013 Jun;36(3):485-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Maria Wängqvist
Ann Frisén
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Box 500, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. maria.wangqvist@psy.gu.se
Source
J Adolesc. 2013 Jun;36(3):485-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Analysis of Variance
Body Image
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study with Swedish 18-year-olds (N = 714, 55.2% women) was to investigate identity formation in relation to body-esteem and body ideal internalization. These are all important aspects of adolescents' development, but little is known about how they are related. This study indicates that late adolescents' identity formation, body-esteem, and body ideal internalizations are related. Women's interpersonal identity commitments and explorations were related to more positive thoughts about how others evaluate their appearance. Their interpersonal identity explorations were also related to more internalization of societal body ideals. For men, stronger interpersonal identity commitments were related to more positive own evaluations about their appearance. The results also showed that compared to men, women explored identity issues more, had poorer body-esteem, and had internalized body ideals more.
PubMed ID
23518285 View in PubMed
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Swedish adolescents' experiences of cybervictimization and body-related concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309355
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2020 Feb; 61(1):68-76
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Ann Frisén
Sofia Berne
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2020 Feb; 61(1):68-76
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Cyberbullying - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Schools
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between cybervictimization and three body-related concerns: body-esteem, self-objectification, and internalization of body ideals. The aim was also to examine these relationships not only to cybervictimization in general but also to appearance-related cybervictimization more specifically. The sample comprised 482 adolescents (233 girls and 247 boys aged 13-15; two participants did not answer the question about gender) from four Swedish schools. The results showed that victims of appearance-related cyberbullying suffered from more body-related concerns: they had a poorer view of their general appearance and of their weight. They also reported more body shame, thin-ideal internalization, and appearance-related pressure from the media. This study shows that cyberbullying that focuses on the victim's appearance is associated with several body-related concerns that have not previously been studied. A novel finding was also that body-related concerns were not related to cyberbullying in general, as has been implied in earlier research, but specifically related to cyberbullying directed at the victim's appearance. The findings suggest that there is a need to include attention to the specific relationships between appearance-related cyberbullying and body-related concerns in future prevention and intervention work.
PubMed ID
31310006 View in PubMed
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Swedish pupils' suggested coping strategies if cyberbullied: differences related to age and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267268
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2014 Dec;55(6):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Ann Frisén
Sofia Berne
Lina Marin
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2014 Dec;55(6):578-84
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the coping strategies that Swedish 10 and 12 year-olds (N = 694) suggested they would use if they were cyberbullied, with a special focus on whether there are differences in these strategies related to age and gender. The most commonly suggested coping strategy was telling someone, especially parents and teachers (70.5%). Surprisingly few of the pupils reported that they would tell a friend (2.6%). Differences in suggested coping strategies were found related to age and gender. Findings are discussed in relation to the Swedish sociocultural context as well as in relation to the implications for prevention strategies against cyberbullying.
PubMed ID
25040330 View in PubMed
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Swedish women's perceptions of and conformity to feminine norms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290876
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2017 Jun; 58(3):238-248
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Johanna Kling
Kristina Holmqvist Gattario
Ann Frisén
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2017 Jun; 58(3):238-248
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Femininity
Humans
Perception
Social Behavior
Social Conformity
Sweden
Women - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The relatively high gender equality in the Swedish society is likely to exert an influence on gender role construction. Hence, the present research aimed to investigate Swedish women's perceptions of and conformity to feminine norms. A mixed methods approach with two studies was used. In Study 1, young Swedish women's gender role conformity, as measured by the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory 45 (CFNI-45), was compared to the results from previously published studies in Canada, the United States, and Slovakia. Overall, Swedish women displayed less conformity than their foreign counterparts, with the largest difference on the subscale Sexual fidelity. In Study 2, focus group interviews with young Swedish women added a more complex picture of feminine norms in the Swedish society. For instance the results indicated that Swedish women, while living in a society with a strong gender equality discourse, are torn between the perceived need to invest in their appearances and the risk of being viewed as non-equal when doing so. In sum, despite the fact that traditional gender roles are less pronounced in Sweden, gender role conformity is still a pressing issue. Since attending to the potential roles of feminine norms in women's lives previously has been proposed to be useful in counseling and therapeutic work, the present research also offers valuable information for both researchers and practitioners. [Correction added on 5 May 2017, after first online publication in April 2017: An incorrect Abstract was inadvertently captured in the published article and has been corrected in this current version.].
PubMed ID
28436998 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.