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Doctor-patient communication and cancer patients' choice of alternative therapies as supplement or alternative to conventional care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124425
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):70-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Anita Salamonsen
Author Affiliation
The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. anita.salamonsen@uit.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):70-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Communication
Complementary Therapies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Abstract
Cancer patients' use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread, despite the fact that clinical studies validating the efficacy of CAM remain sparse in the Nordic countries. The purpose of this study was to explore possible connections between cancer patients' communication experiences with doctors and the decision to use CAM as either supplement or alternative to conventional treatment (CT). The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics and the Norwegian Data Inspectorate approved the study. From a group of 52 cancer patients with self-reported positive experiences from use of CAM, 13 were selected for qualitative interviews. Six used CAM as supplement, and seven as alternative to CT, periodically or permanently. Communication experiences with 46 doctors were described. The analysis revealed three connections between doctor-patient communication and patients' treatment decisions: (i) negative communication experiences because of the use of CAM; (ii) negative communication experiences resulted in the decision to use CAM, and in some cases to decline CT; and (iii) positive communication experiences led to the decision to use CAM as supplement, not alternative to CT. The patients, including the decliners of CT, wanted to discuss treatment decisions in well-functioning interpersonal processes with supportive doctors. In doctors' practices and education of doctors, a greater awareness of potential positive and negative outcomes of doctor-patient communication that concern CAM issues could be of importance. More research is needed to safeguard CAM users' treatment decisions and their relationship to conventional health care.
PubMed ID
22583118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gender differences in prevalence and associations for use of CAM in a large population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258436
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14(1):463
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Anita Salamonsen
Frauke Musial
Katarina Hamberg
Author Affiliation
The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. agnete.kristoffersen@uit.no.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14(1):463
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Self-reported use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) varies widely from 10% to 75% in the general populations worldwide. When limited to use of a CAM provider 2% to 49% reported use is found. CAM use is believed to be closely associated with socio demographic variables such as gender, age, education, income and health complaints. However, studies have only occasionally differentiated CAM use according to gender. Therefore, the aim of the study presented here is to describe the prevalence of CAM use on the background of gender and to describe the specific characteristics of male and female users in the total Tromsø 6 population.
A total of 12,982 men and women aged 30-87 in the municipality of Tromsø, Norway went through a health screening program and completed two self-administered questionnaires in 2007/2008. The questionnaires were developed specifically for the Tromsø study and included questions about life style and health issues in addition to socio demographic variables.
A total of 33% of the participants reported use of any CAM within the last 12 months, women more often than men (42% and 24%, respectively). When limited to visits to a CAM provider, we found 17% use among women and 8% among men. The relationship between the demographic variables and being a CAM user differed significantly between men and women with regard to age, household income, and marital status. We did not find significant differences between men and women concerning education and self-reported health.
Findings from this study suggest that the prevalence and associations for use of CAM differ between men and women concerning several socio demographic variables (age, education and household income). Neglect of women's health care needs in public health care may contribute to the fact that women to a higher degree than men turn to CAM and CAM products.
PubMed ID
25465676 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is it possible to distinguish homeopathic aggravation from adverse effects? A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126331
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Trine Stub
Anita Salamonsen
Terje Alraek
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), University of Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(1):13-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Homeopathy - adverse effects - standards
Humans
Male
Norway
Safety
Abstract
Homeopathic aggravation is a temporary worsening of existing symptoms following the administration of a correct homeopathic prescription. The aim of this study was to explore and compose criteria that may differentiate homeopathic aggravations from adverse effects.
A qualitative approach was employed using focus group interviews. 2 interviews, with 11 experienced homeopaths, were performed in Oslo, Norway. The practitioners have practiced classical homeopathy over a period of 10-32 years. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the text data. The codes were defined before and during the data analysis.
We found that aggravations were subtle and multifaceted events. Moreover, highly skilled homeopaths are required to identify and report aggravations. Adverse effect may be defined as an 'undesirable effect of a remedy'. This definition is pragmatic, flexible, and more in line with the holistic paradigm that the homeopaths represent. 8 criteria that distinguish aggravation from adverse effect were found. Highly sensitive persons hold a unique position regarding safety, as it is important to identify these patients in order to treat them correctly and avoid undesirable effects of the treatment.
This study rigorously explored homeopaths' views and experience on aggravation and adverse effects. The 8 criteria developed in this study may ensure patient safety and support therapists in identifying an 'undesirable effect of a remedy'.
PubMed ID
22398921 View in PubMed
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Mapping the risk perception and communication gap between different professions of healthcare providers in cancer care: a cross-sectional protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273711
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e008236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Trine Stub
Frauke Musial
Sara A Quandt
Thomas A Arcury
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Kristoffersen
Gro Berntsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e008236
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Health Personnel - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Patient Participation
Perception
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Studies show that patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have a poorer survival prognosis than those who do not. It remains unclear whether this is due to a priori poorer prognosis that makes patients turn to CAM, or whether there is a factor associated with CAM use itself that influences the prognosis negatively. Healthcare providers should assist patients in safeguarding their treatment decision. However, the current non-communication between CAM and conventional providers leaves it up to the patients themselves to choose how to best integrate the two worlds of therapy. In this study, an interactive shared decision-making (SDM) tool will be developed to enable patients and health professionals to make safe health choices.
We will delineate, compare and evaluate perception and clinical experience of communication of risk situations among oncology experts, general practitioners and CAM practitioners. To accomplish this, we will develop a pilot and implement a large-scale survey among the aforementioned health professionals in Norway. Guided by the survey results, we will develop a ß-version of a shared decision-making tool for healthcare providers to use in guiding patients to make safe CAM decisions.
Participants must give their informed and written consent before inclusion. They will be informed about the opportunity to drop out from the study followed by deletion of all data registered. The study needs no approval from The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics because all participants are healthcare professionals. Results from this study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed medical journals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26338839 View in PubMed
Less detail

Modes of embodiment in breast cancer patients using complementary and alternative medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121403
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Nov;22(11):1497-512
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Anita Salamonsen
Tove Kruse
Sissel H Eriksen
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. anita.salamonsen@uit.no
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Nov;22(11):1497-512
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Complementary Therapies - psychology
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Sensation - physiology
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
Breast cancer patients are frequent users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). They often have complex reasons for, and experiences from, their use of CAM. Bodily experiences are important and almost unexplored elements in CAM use. Our aim was to explore the meaning and importance of bodily experiences among breast cancer patients who were using CAM as a supplement or an alternative to conventional treatment (CT). Our findings based on qualitative interviews with 13 women suggest that bodily experiences were particularly important when positioned outside conventional health care prior to medical diagnosis and as users of CAM as alternative to CT. We introduce three central modes of embodiment related to CAM use: the right to one's body, the body used as a gauge, and the body used as a guide. Patients' positioning between treatment systems should be further explored from a bodily perspective to safeguard and optimize their treatment choices.
PubMed ID
22910592 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Red flag! risk assessment among medical homeopaths in Norway: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120812
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:150
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Trine Stub
Terje Alraek
Anita Salamonsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:150
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Homeopathy - adverse effects - methods - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Safety
Physicians - psychology
Qualitative Research
Risk assessment
Abstract
Homeopathy is widely used, and many European physicians practice homeopathy in addition to conventional medicine. Adverse effects in homeopathy are not expected by homeopaths due to the negligible quantities of active substances in a remedy. However, we questioned if homeopathic aggravation, which is described as a temporary worsening of existing symptoms following a correct homeopathic remedy, should be regarded as adverse effects or ruled out as desirable events of the treatment. In order to improve knowledge in an unexplored area of patient safety, we explored how medical homeopath discriminate between homeopathic aggravations and adverse effects, and how they assessed patient safety in medical practice.
A qualitative approach was employed using focus group interviews. Two interviews with seven medical homeopaths were performed in Oslo, Norway. The participants practiced homeopathy besides conventional medicine. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the text data. The codes were defined before and during the data analysis.
According to the medical homeopaths, a feeling of well-being may be a criterion to distinguish homeopathic aggravations from adverse effects. There was disagreement among the participants whether or not homeopathic treatment produced adverse effects. However, they agreed when an incorrect remedy was administrated, it may create a disruption or suppressive reaction in the patient. This was not perceived as adverse effects but a possibility to prescribe a new remedy as new symptoms emerge. This study revealed several advantages for the patients as the medical homeopaths looked for dangerous symptoms which may enhance safety. The patient was given time and space, which enabled the practitioner to see the complete picture. A more comprehensive toolkit gave the medical homeopaths a feeling of professionalism.
This explorative study investigated how Medical Homeopaths understood and assessed risk in their clinical practice. A feeling of well-being emerging soon after taking the remedy was the most important criterion for discriminating between Homeopathic Aggravations and Adverse Effects in clinical practice. The Medical Homeopaths used the view of both professions and always looked for red flag situations in the consultation room. They combined knowledge from two treatment systems which may have advantages for the patient. These tentative results deserve further research efforts to improve patient safety among users of homeopathy. For further research we find it important to improve and develop concepts that are unique to homeopathy in order to validate and modernize this medical practice.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22967054 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290827
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298090
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Allostasis
Culture
Emotions
Ethnic groups - history
Health
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Music - history
Resilience, Psychological
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Singing
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
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