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Aesthetic result after breast-conserving therapy is associated with quality of life several years after treatment. Swedish women evaluated with BCCT.core and BREAST-Q™.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289249
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Cecilia Dahlbäck
Jenny Heiman Ullmark
Martin Rehn
Anita Ringberg
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. cecilia.dahlback@med.lu.se.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Aug; 164(3):679-687
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - surgery
Female
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A gold standard for evaluation of aesthetic outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is still lacking. The BCCT.core software has been developed to assess aesthetic result in a standardised way. We aimed to study how the result of BCCT.core after BCT is associated with quality of life, measured with the BREAST-Q™, a validated questionnaire.
Women eligible for BCT were consecutively recruited between February 1st 2008 and January 31st 2012 (n = 653). Photographs of 310 women, taken one year after BCT, were evaluated using the BCCT.core software. The postoperative BCT module of the BREAST-Q™ questionnaire was administered by mail and 348 questionnaires were returned (median 5.5 years after BCT). In all, 216 women had both BCCT.core results and completed BREAST-Q™ questionnaires available.
The results from the BCCT.core evaluation were: excellent n = 49 (15.8%); good n = 178 (57.4%); fair n = 73 (23.5%); poor n = 10 (3.2%). The median BREAST-Q™ score for satisfaction with breasts was 66 [interquartile range (IQR) 57-80] and for psychosocial well-being 82 (IQR 61-100). Poor/fair results on BCCT.core were associated with Q-scores below median for both satisfaction with breasts [odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (confidence interval (CI) 1.7-6.8)] as well as for psychosocial well-being [OR 2.2 (CI 1.1-4.2)].
A statistically significant association between BCCT.core results one year after BCT and quality of life ratings using BREAST-Q™ several years later is shown in this study. This implies that the BCCT.core may be valuable in BCT follow-up and used as a standardised instrument in the evaluation of aesthetic results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28536951 View in PubMed
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Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in Swedish women at high risk of breast cancer: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134424
Source
Ann Surg. 2011 Jun;253(6):1147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Brita Arver
Karin Isaksson
Hans Atterhem
Annika Baan
Leif Bergkvist
Yvonne Brandberg
Hans Ehrencrona
Monica Emanuelsson
Henrik Hellborg
Karin Henriksson
Per Karlsson
Niklas Loman
Jonas Lundberg
Anita Ringberg
Marie Stenmark Askmalm
Marie Wickman
Kerstin Sandelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Ann Surg. 2011 Jun;253(6):1147-54
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology - surgery
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Mastectomy
Middle Aged
Reoperation
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study attempted a national inventory of all bilateral prophylactic mastectomies performed in Sweden between 1995 and 2005 in high-risk women without a previous breast malignancy. The primary aim was to investigate the breast cancer incidence after surgery. Secondary aims were to describe the preoperative risk assessment, operation techniques, complications, histopathological findings, and regional differences.
Geneticists, oncologists and surgeons performing prophylactic breast surgery were asked to identify all women eligible for inclusion in their region. The medical records were reviewed in each region and the data were analyzed centrally. The BOADICEA risk assessment model was used to calculate the number of expected/prevented breast cancers during the follow-up period.
A total of 223 women operated on in 8 hospitals were identified. During a mean follow-up of 6.6 years, no primary breast cancer was observed compared with 12 expected cases. However, 1 woman succumbed 9 years post mastectomy to widespread adenocarcinoma of uncertain origin. Median age at operation was 40 years. A total of 58% were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. All but 3 women underwent breast reconstruction, 208 with implants and 12 with autologous tissue. Four small, unifocal, invasive cancers and 4 ductal carcinoma in situ were found in the mastectomy specimens. The incidence of nonbreast related complications was low (3%). Implant loss due to infection/necrosis occurred in 21 women (10%) but a majority received a new implant later. In total, 64% of the women underwent at least 1unanticipated secondary operation.
Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy is safe and efficacious in reducing future breast cancer in asymptomatic women at high risk. Unanticipated reoperations are common. Given the small number of patients centralization seems justified.
PubMed ID
21587115 View in PubMed
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Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ: 20 years follow-up in the randomized SweDCIS Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261231
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2014 Nov 10;32(32):3613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2014
Author
Fredrik Wärnberg
Hans Garmo
Stefan Emdin
Veronica Hedberg
Linda Adwall
Kerstin Sandelin
Anita Ringberg
Per Karlsson
Lars-Gunnar Arnesson
Harald Anderson
Karin Jirström
Lars Holmberg
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2014 Nov 10;32(32):3613-8
Date
Nov-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - radiotherapy - surgery
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - radiotherapy - surgery
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mammography - methods
Mass Screening - methods
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Four randomized studies show that adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) lowers the risk of subsequent ipsilateral breast events (IBEs) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by approximately 50% after 10 to 15 years. We present 20 years of follow-up data for the SweDCIS trial.
Between 1987 and 1999 1,046 women were randomly assigned to RT or not after BCS for primary DCIS. Results up to 2005 have been published, and we now add another 7 years of follow-up. All breast cancer events and causes of death were registered.
There were 129 in situ and 129 invasive IBEs. Absolute risk reduction in the RT arm was 12.0% at 20 years (95% CI, 6.5 to 17.7), with a relative risk reduction of 37.5%. Absolute reduction was 10.0% (95% CI, 6.0 to 14.0) for in situ and 2.0% (95% CI, -3.0 to 7.0) for invasive IBEs. There was a nonstatistically significantly increased number of contralateral events in the RT arm (67 v 48 events; hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, 0.95 to 2.00). Breast cancer-specific death and overall survival were not influenced. Younger women experienced a relatively higher risk of invasive IBE and lower effect of RT. The hazard over time looked different for in situ and invasive IBEs.
Use of adjuvant RT is supported by 20-year follow-up. Modest protection against invasive recurrences and a possible increase in contralateral cancers still call for a need to find groups of patients for whom RT could be avoided or mastectomy with breast reconstruction is indicated.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Oncol. 2014 Nov 10;32(32):3588-9025311214
PubMed ID
25311220 View in PubMed
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A feasible computer-based evaluation tool for reduction mammaplasty patients: indications for operation and monitoring of guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103097
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2014 Jul;67(7):927-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Emma Hansson
Jonas Manjer
Jerker Börrén
Malin Levin
Lotta Mulder
Anita Ringberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: emma.hansson@med.lu.se.
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2014 Jul;67(7):927-31
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Breast - anatomy & histology - pathology - surgery
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Decision Support Techniques
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hyperplasia - surgery
Mammaplasty
National Health Programs
Organ Size
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
In Sweden, evidence-based national guidelines for the indication for reduction mammaplasty in the public health-care system have been developed by a group of experts. They were defined as breast volume=800 ml at normal weight. Furthermore, a volume asymmetry of 25% or at least 200 ml or an extreme ptosis may be an indication in some cases. The aim of the present paper was to describe an easy-to-use computer-based tool that has been developed to assure that patients with mammary hyperplasia are evaluated and offered care in a standardized fashion and that the adherence to the guidelines is monitored. Included variables were based on a model for priority grouping originally presented by Strömbeck and Malm in 1986 and comprise body mass index (BMI), BMI-corrected breast volume, ptosis, asymmetry, and general breast-related factors preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively and complications postoperatively. Between June 2007 and January 2013, 377 patients were evaluated. Of which, 275 qualified for operation. With the help of the computer-based tool, compliance to the indications for operation can be easily followed, and hence the intended patients offered a reduction mammaplasty in the public health-care system.
PubMed ID
24816579 View in PubMed
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Given breast cancer, does breast size matter? Data from a prospective breast cancer cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123464
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1307-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Andrea Markkula
Anna Bromée
Maria Henningson
Maria Hietala
Anita Ringberg
Christian Ingvar
Carsten Rose
Helena Jernström
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Barngatan 2B, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1307-16
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body mass index
Breast - anatomy & histology
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - pathology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and tumor characteristics affect disease-free survival. Larger breast size may increase breast cancer risk, but its influence on disease-free survival is unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether breast size independently influenced disease-free survival in breast cancer patients.
Body measurements were obtained preoperatively from 772 breast cancer patients in a population-based ongoing cohort from southern Sweden. The research nurse measured breast volumes with plastic cups used by plastic surgeons doing breast reductions. Clinical data were obtained from patient charts and pathology reports.
Patients with a BMI = 25 kg/m(2) had larger tumors (p  0.85 had larger tumors (p = 0.013), more advanced histological grade (p = 0.0016), and more axillary nodal involvement (p = 0.012). Patients with right + left breast volume = 850 mL were more likely to have larger tumor sizes (p = 0.018), more advanced histological grade (p = 0.031), and more axillary nodal involvement (p = 0.025). There were 62 breast cancer events during the 7-year follow-up. Breast volume = 850 mL was associated with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004) and distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.001) in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors independent of other anthropometric measurements and age. In patients with ER-positive tumors, breast size was an independent predictor of shorter disease-free (HR 3.64; 95 % CI 1.42-9.35) and distant metastasis-free survival (HR 6.33; 95 %CI 1.36-29.43), adjusted for tumor characteristics, BMI, age, and treatment.
A simple and cheap anthropometric measurement with standardized tools may help identify a subgroup of patients in need of tailored breast cancer therapy.
PubMed ID
22695757 View in PubMed
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