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Characteristics of cardiac arrest and resuscitation by age group: an analysis from the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93913
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2007 Nov;25(9):1025-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Herlitz Johan
Svensson Leif
Engdahl Johan
Gelberg Jan
Silfverstolpe Johan
Wisten Aase
Angquist Karl-Axel
Holmberg Stig
Author Affiliation
Department of Metabolism and Cardiovascular Research, Institute of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. johan.herlitz@hjl.gu.se
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2007 Nov;25(9):1025-31
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Countershock
Female
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: The objective of this study was to describe patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by age group. METHODS: All patients who suffered from an OHCA between 1990 and 2005 and are included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (n = 40,503) were classified into the following age groups: neonates, younger than 1 year; young children, between 1 and 4 years; older children, between 5 and 12 years; adolescents, between 13 and 17 years; young adults, between 18 and 35 years; adults not retired, between 36 and 64 years; adults retired, between 65 and 79 years; and older adults, 80 years or older. RESULTS: Ventricular fibrillation was lowest in young children (3%) and highest in adults (35%). Survival to 1 month was lowest in neonates (2.6%) and highest in older children (7.8%). Children (35 years) survived to 1 month 24.5%, 21.2%, and 13.6% of cases, respectively (P = .0003 for trend) when found in a shockable rhythm. The corresponding figures for nonshockable rhythms were 3.8%, 3.2%, and 1.6%, respectively (P
PubMed ID
18022497 View in PubMed
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Hand cold recovery responses before and after 15 months of military training in a cold climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92075
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2008 Sep;79(9):904-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Brändström Helge
Grip Helena
Hallberg Per
Grönlund Christer
Angquist Karl-Axel
Giesbrecht Gordon G
Author Affiliation
University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. helge.brandstrom@vll.se
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2008 Sep;79(9):904-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Body Temperature Regulation
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Pilot Projects
Time Factors
Vasoconstriction - physiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The ability of fingers to rapidly rewarm following cold exposure is a possible indicator of cold injury protection. We categorized the post-cooling hand-rewarming responses of men before and after participation in 15 mo of military training in a cold environment in northern Sweden to determine: 1) if the initial rewarming category was related to the occurrence of local cold injury during training; and 2) if cold training affected subsequent hand-rewarming responses. METHODS: Immersion of the dominant hand in 10 degrees C water for 10 min was performed pre-training on 77 men. Of those, 45 were available for successful post-training retests. Infrared thermography monitored the dorsal hand during 30 min of recovery. Rewarming was categorized as normal, moderate, or slow based on mean fingertip temperature at the end of 30 min of recovery (TFinger,30) and the percentage of time that fingertips were vasodilated (%VD). RESULTS: Cold injury occurrence during training was disproportionately higher in the slow rewarmers (four of the five injuries). Post-training, baseline fingertip temperatures and cold recovery variables increased significantly in moderate and slow rewarmers: TFinger30 increased from 21.9 +/- 4 to 30.4 +/- 6 degrees C (Moderate), and from 17.4 +/- 0 to 22.3 +/- 7 degrees C (Slow); %VD increased from 27.5 +/- 16 to 65.9 +/- 34% (Moderate), and from 0.7 +/- 2 to 31.7 +/- 44% (Slow). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the cold recovery test were related to the occurrence of local cold injury during long-term cold-weather training. Cold training itself improved baseline and cold recovery in moderate and slow rewarmers.
PubMed ID
18785360 View in PubMed
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