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"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292037
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1476638
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

"The prayer circles in the air": a qualitative study about traditional healer profiles and practice in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298068
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Municipality Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1476638
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Shamanism
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.
PubMed ID
29848221 View in PubMed
Less detail

"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):795-805 PMID 23221918
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Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2015 Sep;23 (5):569-76 PMID 25471490
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
Less detail

"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287106
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
Less detail

"We own the illness": a qualitative study of networks in two communities with mixed ethnicity in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289872
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1438572
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, The Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1438572
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
When people in Northern Norway get ill, they often use traditional medicine. The global aim of this study was to examine the extended family networks' function and responsibility in cases of illness in the family, in two Northern Norwegian communities with a population of mixed ethnicity.
Semi-structured individual interviews with 13 participants and 4 focus group interviews with total 11 participants were conducted. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis.
The participants grew up in areas where it was common to seek help from traditional healers. They were organized in networks and shared responsibility for the patient and they provided practical help and support for the family. According to the networks, health-care personnel should make room for the entire network to visit the patient in severe and life-threatening situations.
Traditional networks are an extra resource for people in these communities. The networks seem to be essential in handling and disseminating hope and manageability on an individual as well as a collective level. Health personnel working in communities with mixed ethnicity should have thorough knowledge of the mixed culture, including the importance of traditional network to the patients.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):261-70 PMID 16871832
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):601-31 PMID 23965730
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):651-72 PMID 24846701
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Feb 13;74:25125 PMID 25683064
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-8 PMID 11513933
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):403-11 PMID 18760954
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Dec 09;72:21775 PMID 24350066
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
Cites: Prev Med. 2012 Nov;55(5):387-9 PMID 22884666
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S40-6 PMID 20147663
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1271590 PMID 28452679
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):167-81 PMID 12862180
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2011 May;83(2):222-6 PMID 20580520
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;141:133-41 PMID 26275362
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17 (1):530 PMID 29233186
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Feb;109(2):186-204 PMID 425958
PubMed ID
29466927 View in PubMed
Less detail

"We own the illness": a qualitative study of networks in two communities with mixed ethnicity in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298101
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1438572
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, The Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1438572
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Networking
Abstract
When people in Northern Norway get ill, they often use traditional medicine. The global aim of this study was to examine the extended family networks' function and responsibility in cases of illness in the family, in two Northern Norwegian communities with a population of mixed ethnicity.
Semi-structured individual interviews with 13 participants and 4 focus group interviews with total 11 participants were conducted. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis.
The participants grew up in areas where it was common to seek help from traditional healers. They were organized in networks and shared responsibility for the patient and they provided practical help and support for the family. According to the networks, health-care personnel should make room for the entire network to visit the patient in severe and life-threatening situations.
Traditional networks are an extra resource for people in these communities. The networks seem to be essential in handling and disseminating hope and manageability on an individual as well as a collective level. Health personnel working in communities with mixed ethnicity should have thorough knowledge of the mixed culture, including the importance of traditional network to the patients.
PubMed ID
29466927 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.