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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
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Changes in attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric treatment 1976-2014 in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274492
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(1):38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Helia Faghir Mirnezami
Lars Jacobsson
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(1):38-44
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology - psychology - therapy
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Public Opinion
Social Stigma
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental illness has always been subject to stigma and discrimination. There are a number of studies on public attitudes towards people with mental illness. Long-term studies, however, examining changes over time are scarce.
The aim of this study was to examine potential changes concerning attitudes between 1976 and 2014 in Vilhelmina, a community in northern Sweden.
A postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of 500 adults aged 18-70 years. The same questionnaire has previously been used in 1976 and 2003.
The attitudes towards people with mental illness have not generally become more positive over the years. In 2014 almost a quarter of the population still think that "people with mental illness commit violentX acts more than others". Even more people in 2014 than in 1976 agree to the statement that "mental illness harms the reputation more than a physical disease" (77.2% versus 52.8%). People with low educational level have more negative views than people with higher education. Younger respondents,
PubMed ID
26051607 View in PubMed
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Patient perceptions of a Virtual Health Room installation in rural Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287303
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2016 Oct-Dec;16(4):3823
Publication Type
Article
Author
Simon Näverlo
Dean B Carson
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Mirjam Ekstedt
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2016 Oct-Dec;16(4):3823
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Medically underserved area
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
The Virtual Health Room (VHR) is an ehealth initiative in the village of Slussfors in northern Sweden. Construction of VHRs in other locations is taking place, and the Centre for Rural Medicine in the Västerbotten County Council primary care department has implemented a VHR evaluation framework. This research focuses on evaluation of patient perceptions of the usability of the VHR and its contribution to their health care.
Nineteen of the 25 unique users of the VHR during 2014/15 completed a survey asking about their attitudes to their own health (using the 13-question version of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM)), their demographic attributes, and their satisfaction with their visit to the VHR.
Respondents with lower PAM scores were less satisfied with the technical performance of the VHR, but equally likely to think the VHR made a good contribution to access to health care. In contrast, older patients were less likely to value the contribution of the VHR, but no less likely to be satisfied with its technical performance. There were no relationships between level of education and distance travelled and perceptions of the VHR.
The research clearly demonstrated the distinction between technical performance of an ehealth initiative and its overall contribution to health care and access. Evaluation frameworks need to consider both aspects of performance. Transferability of these findings to other settings may depend at least in part on the nature of the catchment area for the VHR, with the Slussfors catchment being quite small and the impact of distance on access consequently limited.
PubMed ID
27884057 View in PubMed
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