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Seasonal variation in the thermal responses to changing environmental temperature in the world's northernmost landbird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286983
Source
J Exp Biol. 2017 Nov 07;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Andreas Nord
Lars P Folkow
Source
J Exp Biol. 2017 Nov 07;
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Arctic homeotherms counter challenges at high latitudes using a combination of seasonal adjustments in pelage/plumage, fat deposition, and intricate thermoregulatory adaptations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of their thermal responses to cold, particularly in Arctic birds. Here, we have studied the potential use of local heterothermy (i.e., tissue cooling that can contribute to significantly lower heat loss rate) in Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) - the world's northernmost landbird. We exposed birds kept under simulated Svalbard photoperiod to low ambient temperatures (Ta; between 0 and -30°C) during three seasons (early winter, late winter, summer), whilst recording resting metabolic rate (RMR), core temperature (Tc) and several cutaneous temperatures. Leg skin temperature varied the most, but still only by up to ~15°C, whereas body trunk skin temperature changed
PubMed ID
29113988 View in PubMed
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Seasonal variation in the thermal responses to changing environmental temperature in the world's northernmost land bird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297759
Source
J Exp Biol. 2018 01 10; 221(Pt 1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-10-2018
Author
Andreas Nord
Lars P Folkow
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Section for Evolutionary Ecology, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden andreas.nord@biol.lu.se.
Source
J Exp Biol. 2018 01 10; 221(Pt 1):
Date
01-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Temperature Regulation
Cold Temperature
Galliformes - physiology
Male
Seasons
Svalbard
Thermogenesis
Abstract
Arctic homeotherms counter challenges at high latitudes using a combination of seasonal adjustments in pelage/plumage, fat deposition and intricate thermoregulatory adaptations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of their thermal responses to cold, particularly in Arctic birds. Here, we have studied the potential use of local heterothermy (i.e. tissue cooling that can contribute to significantly lower heat loss rate) in Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) - the world's northernmost land bird. We exposed birds kept under simulated Svalbard photoperiod to low ambient temperatures (Ta; between 0 and -30°C) during three seasons (early winter, late winter, summer), whilst recording resting metabolic rate (RMR), core temperature (Tc) and several cutaneous temperatures. Leg skin temperature varied the most, but still only by up to ~15°C, whereas body trunk skin temperature changed
PubMed ID
29113988 View in PubMed
Less detail

What are analog bulletin boards used for today? Analysing media uses, intermediality and technology affordances in Swedish bulletin board messages using a citizen science approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298036
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0202077
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christopher Kullenberg
Frauke Rohden
Anders Björkvall
Fredrik Brounéus
Anders Avellan-Hultman
Johan Järlehed
Sara Van Meerbergen
Andreas Nord
Helle Lykke Nielsen
Tove Rosendal
Lotta Tomasson
Gustav Westberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0202077
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Communication
Communications Media
Costs and Cost Analysis
Humans
Internet
Sweden
Technology
Abstract
Analog bulletin boards are omnipresent in Swedish urban areas, yet little systematic knowledge about this communication medium exists. In the shadow of the rapid emergence of digital media the analog bulletin board has received less attention than its digital successors, many of them having incorporated similar functionality with novel technical solutions. In this study we used a citizen science method to collect 1167 messages from bulletin boards around Sweden aided by school children and teachers, with the purpose of shedding new light on what is communicated on the boards, by whom, using what types of technologies and in what way the messages refer to other media. Results show that the most common messages are invitations to events, such as concerts, lectures and sports events, followed by buy-and-sell ads for goods and services. The most frequent sender is an association, for example NGOs, sports associations or religious communities. Almost half of the sampled messages were professionally printed, about forty per cent were made by home printers. Only six per cent of the messages were handwritten, almost exclusively by private persons as senders. Moreover, we show how the analog bulletin board has adapted to recent changes in media technology-a media landscape which is saturated with electronic- and mobile media. Further, the bulletin board still holds a firm place in a media ecology where local communication is in demand, and exists in parallel with electronic media. Close to forty percent of the messages contained hyperlinks to web pages and we found (and removed for anonymization purposes) more than six hundred phone numbers from the dataset.
PubMed ID
30148848 View in PubMed
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