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Angiographic features and cardiovascular risk factors in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with first-time acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120091
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Jan 1;111(1):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2013
Author
Andreas Knudsen
Anders B Mathiasen
René H Worck
Jens Kastrup
Jan Gerstoft
Terese L Katzenstein
Andreas Kjaer
Anne-Mette Lebech
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. andreas.knudsen@hvh.regionh.dk
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2013 Jan 1;111(1):63-7
Date
Jan-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - radiography
Adult
Aged
Coronary Angiography
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV
HIV Infections - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
A matched cohort study was conducted comparing patients with first-time acute coronary syndromes infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to non-HIV-infected patients with and without diabetes matched for smoking, gender, and type of acute coronary syndrome who underwent first-time coronary angiography. A total of 48 HIV-infected patients were identified from a national database. Coronary angiography showed that the HIV-infected patients had significantly fewer lesions with classification B2/C than the 2 control groups (p
PubMed ID
23040592 View in PubMed
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ANP, BNP and D-dimer predict right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141408
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Nov;30(6):466-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Henrik Gutte
Jann Mortensen
Claus V Jensen
Peter von der Recke
Claus L Petersen
Ulrik S Kristoffersen
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Nov;30(6):466-72
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products - analysis
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Odds Ratio
Perfusion Imaging
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Embolism - blood - complications - diagnosis
ROC Curve
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Troponin I - blood
Up-Regulation
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - blood - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Right
Abstract
The aim of this study was to predict right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) using plasma concentration of D-dimer, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and cardiac troponin I (TNI) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).
Patients suspected of PE had a ventilation/perfusion-single-photon emission-tomography (V/Q-SPECT), pulmonary multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) angiography, blood samples and ECG-gated cardiac CT performed the same day.
Pro-ANP, BNP and D-dimer are associated with significantly elevated levels in PE patients with RVD. ROC curves demonstrated that D-dimer, pro-ANP and BNP were accurate for detection of RVD.
Because measurements of cardiac biomarkers are inexpensive and easily obtained they may prove useful in the clinical diagnosis of RVD. However because of the small sample size, the results need to be confirmed in larger studies.
PubMed ID
20726994 View in PubMed
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[Canine cancer patients are included in translational research].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274746
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jul 7;176(28):V01130041
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-2014
Author
Betina Børresen
Malene Martini Clausen
Anders Elias Hansen
Kamilla Westarp Zornhagen
Annemarie Thuri Kristensen
Svend Aage Engelholm
Andreas Kjær
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jul 7;176(28):V01130041
Date
Jul-7-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Disease Models, Animal
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - radiotherapy
Dogs
Humans
Molecular Imaging - methods
Neoplasms - diagnosis - radiotherapy - veterinary
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Translational Medical Research
Abstract
Cancer bearing dogs represent a unique clinical cancer model with a direct potential for accelerating translation into human patients. A research collaboration between the veterinary and human medical facilities at Copenhagen University and Rigshospitalet has taken offset in this. Canine cancer patients are implemented for development of new strategies in molecular imaging and radiotherapy. The obtained results will be used to guide human clinical trials.
PubMed ID
25291999 View in PubMed
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Cardiac ??mTc sestamibi SPECT and ¹8F FDG PET as viability markers in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263237
Source
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Oct;30(7):1407-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Thomas Emil Christensen
Lia Evi Bang
Lene Holmvang
Adam Ali Ghotbi
Martin Lyngby Lassen
Flemming Andersen
Nikolaj Ihlemann
Hedvig Andersson
Peer Grande
Andreas Kjaer
Philip Hasbak
Source
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Oct;30(7):1407-16
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Angiography
Denmark
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Heart Ventricles - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Myocardial Contraction
Positron-Emission Tomography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Recovery of Function
Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy - physiopathology - radiography - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi - diagnostic use
Time Factors
Tissue Survival
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
In patients with heart failure (HF) due to coronary disease, a combined evaluation of perfusion and glucose metabolism by cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to distinguish viable from non-viable myocardium, and current guidelines recommend cardiac SPECT and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET for viability assessment. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a disease characterized by acute but reversible HF leaving no scarring. To explore how robust the semi-quantitative viability criteria used in cardiac SPECT and FDG PET stands their ground in a population with TTC. From 1 September 2009 to 1 October 2012, 24 patients suspected of TTC were enrolled in a multimodality cardiac imaging research project. Echocardiography, (99m)Tc SPECT, and (18)F FDG PET were performed during the acute admission and at follow-up 4 months later. Nineteen patients had a final diagnosis of TTC consistent with Mayo Clinic Diagnostic Criteria. Three of these patients were excluded from further analysis, since wall motion abnormalities were not persistent at the time of nuclear imaging. The remaining sixteen patients exhibited a distinct pattern with HF, "apical ballooning" and a perfusion-metabolism defect in the midventricular/apical region. When viability criteria were applied, they identified significant scarring/limited hibernation in the akinetic part of the left ventricle. However, full recovery was found in all TTC patients on follow-up. Using the current guideline-endorsed viability criteria for semiquantitative cardiac SPECT and FDG PET, these modalities failed to demonstrate the presence of viability in the acute state of TTC.
PubMed ID
24852336 View in PubMed
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Changes in lung function of HIV-infected patients: a 4.5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123634
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ulrik Sloth Kristoffersen
Anne-Mette Lebech
Jann Mortensen
Jan Gerstoft
Henrik Gutte
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ulriksk@sund.ku.dk
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - virology
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - virology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To investigate the development of lung function in HIV-infected patients.
In a prospective cohort study, 88 HIV-infected patients had a lung function test performed and 63 patients (72%) had their LFT repeated with a median follow-up period of 4.4 years. Forty-eight per cent were smokers, and at the re-examination, 97% were on combination antiretroviral therapy.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity was reduced and decreased over time in both smokers and non-smokers. Alveolar volume decreased and forced vital capacity increased similarly in both smokers and non-smokers. No changes were observed in forced expiratory volume or peak flow, but smokers had reduced values compared with those of the non-smokers at both examinations. FEV1/FVC was reduced especially in smokers and declined in both smokers and non-smokers.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity is reduced in HIV-infected patients and seems to decline over time. Additionally, signs of obstructive lung disease are present in HIV-infected patients and seem to increase over time, although only modestly.
PubMed ID
22681606 View in PubMed
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Copenhagen comorbidity in HIV infection (COCOMO) study: a study protocol for a longitudinal, non-interventional assessment of non-AIDS comorbidity in HIV infection in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283204
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 26;16(1):713
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2016
Author
Andreas Ronit
Judith Haissman
Ditte Marie Kirkegaard-Klitbo
Thomas Skårup Kristensen
Anne-Mette Lebech
Thomas Benfield
Jan Gerstoft
Henrik Ullum
Lars Køber
Andreas Kjær
Klaus Kofoed
Jørgen Vestbo
Børge Nordestgaard
Jens Lundgren
Susanne Dam Nielsen
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 26;16(1):713
Date
Nov-26-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Adult
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Computed Tomography Angiography
Denmark - epidemiology
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Leukocytes, Mononuclear
Life expectancy
Liver Diseases - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Observational Studies as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Modern combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has improved survival for people living with HIV (PLWHIV). Non-AIDS comorbidities have replaced opportunistic infections as leading causes of mortality and morbidity, and are becoming a key health concern as this population continues to age. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence and incidence of non-AIDS comorbidity among PLWHIV in Denmark in the cART era and to determine risk factors contributing to the pathogenesis. The study primarily targets cardiovascular, respiratory, and hepatic non-AIDS comorbidity.
The Copenhagen comorbidity in HIV-infection (COCOMO) study is an observational, longitudinal cohort study. The study was initiated in 2015 and recruitment is ongoing with the aim of including 1500 PLWHIV from the Copenhagen area. Follow-up examinations after 2 and 10 years are planned. Uninfected controls are derived from the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS), a cohort study including 100,000 uninfected participants from the same geographical region. Physiological and biological measures including blood pressure, ankle-brachial index, electrocardiogram, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, transient elastography of the liver, computed tomography (CT) angiography of the heart, unenhanced CT of the chest and upper abdomen, and a number of routine biochemical analysis are uniformly collected in participants from the COCOMO study and the CGPS. Plasma, serum, buffy coat, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), urine, and stool samples are collected in a biobank for future studies. Data will be updated through periodical linking to national databases.
As life expectancy for PLWHIV improves, it is essential to study long-term impact of HIV and cART. We anticipate that findings from this cohort study will increase knowledge on non-AIDS comorbidity in PLWHIV and identify targets for future interventional trials. Recognizing the demographic, clinical and pathophysiological characteristics of comorbidity in PLWHIV may help inform development of new guidelines and enable us to move forward to a more personalized HIV care.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02382822 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
27887644 View in PubMed
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Copenhagen study of overweight patients with coronary artery disease undergoing low energy diet or interval training: the randomized CUT-IT trial protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106071
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lene Rørholm Pedersen
Rasmus Huan Olsen
Marianne Frederiksen
Arne Astrup
Elizaveta Chabanova
Philip Hasbak
Jens Juul Holst
Andreas Kjær
John W Newman
Rosemary Walzem
Ulrik Wisløff
Ahmad Sajadieh
Steen Bendix Haugaard
Eva Prescott
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. lrpedersen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:106
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is accountable for more than 7 million deaths each year according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In a European population 80% of patients diagnosed with CAD are overweight and 31% are obese. Physical inactivity and overweight are major risk factors in CAD, thus central strategies in secondary prevention are increased physical activity and weight loss.
In a randomized controlled trial 70 participants with stable CAD, age 45-75, body mass index 28-40 kg/m2 and no diabetes are randomized (1:1) to 12 weeks of intensive exercise or weight loss both succeeded by a 40-week follow-up. The exercise protocol consist of supervised aerobic interval training (AIT) at 85-90% of VO2peak 3 times weekly for 12 weeks followed by supervised AIT twice weekly for 40 weeks. In the weight loss arm dieticians instruct the participants in a low energy diet (800-1000 kcal/day) for 12 weeks, followed by 40 weeks of weight maintenance combined with supervised AIT twice weekly. The primary endpoint of the study is change in coronary flow reserve after the first 12 weeks' intervention. Secondary endpoints include cardiovascular, metabolic, inflammatory and anthropometric measures.
The study will compare the short and long-term effects of a protocol consisting of AIT alone or a rapid weight loss followed by AIT. Additionally, it will provide new insight in mechanisms behind the benefits of exercise and weight loss. We wish to contribute to the creation of effective secondary prevention and sustainable rehabilitation strategies in the large population of overweight and obese patients diagnosed with CAD.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01724567.
PubMed ID
24252596 View in PubMed
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Early clinical experience and impact of 18F-FDG PET.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16713
Source
Nucl Med Commun. 2005 Nov;26(11):989-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Henrik Gutte
Liselotte Højgaard
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Nucl Med Commun. 2005 Nov;26(11):989-94
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Positron-Emission Tomography - utilization
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the influence and impact of [F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in Denmark. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to the referring physicians of 743 consecutive cases between January 2000 and December 2001. The questionnaire was designed to determine whether and how the results of the FDG PET imaging changed patient management. RESULTS: The response rate was 71% (524 responded). The distribution of all responding physicians included 26 different specialities. The majority were from haematology (23%), oncology (20%), plastic surgery (17%) and neurology (10%). The primary diagnoses at referral was in the field of oncology (94%), with lymphoma (24%), melanomas (20%), unknown primary neoplasms (13%), nervous system neoplasms (9%), lung cancer (6%) and cancer of the digestive system (4%). FDG PET imaging resulted in a change in the patients' management in 224 cases (43%). Of these, surgery was affected in 88 cases. Chemotherapy was affected in 71 cases and radiation therapy in 54 cases. In patients where the intended plan of management was not changed, 78% of the physicians stated that FDG PET was nevertheless clinically helpful; for example confirmed the diagnosis, helped staging, changed treatment plan or confirmed treatment of choice. Physicians indicated a general satisfaction with FDG PET imaging in 86% of the cases. CONCLUSION: This survey-based study indicates that FDG PET imaging has a major impact on patient management, contributing to changes in management in 43% of cases. The present study also demonstrates that referring physicians are generally satisfied with FDG PET imaging in 86% of the cases.
PubMed ID
16208177 View in PubMed
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Endoscopic versus open radial artery harvest and mammario-radial versus aorto-radial grafting in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: protocol for the 2?×?2 factorial designed randomised NEO trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260673
Source
Trials. 2014;15:135
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christian L Carranza
Martin Ballegaard
Mads U Werner
Philip Hasbak
Andreas Kjær
Klaus F Kofoed
Jane Lindschou
Janus Christian Jakobsen
Christian Gluud
Peter Skov Olsen
Daniel A Steinbrüchel
Source
Trials. 2014;15:135
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aorta - physiopathology - surgery
Aortography - methods
Clinical Protocols
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - methods
Denmark
Endoscopy
Female
Graft Occlusion, Vascular - etiology - physiopathology
Hand Injuries - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Mammary Arteries - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Radial Artery - physiopathology - radiography - transplantation
Research Design
Risk factors
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Harvesting - adverse effects - methods
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
Abstract
Coronary artery bypass grafting using the radial artery has, since the 1990s, gone through a revival. Observational studies have indicated better long-term patency when using radial arteries. Therefore, radial artery might be preferred especially in younger patients where long time patency is important. During the last 10 years different endoscopic techniques to harvest the radial artery have evolved. Endoscopic radial artery harvest only requires a small incision near the wrist in contrast to open harvest, which requires an incision from the elbow to the wrist. However, it is unknown whether the endoscopic technique results in fewer complications or a graft patency comparable to open harvest. When the radial artery has been harvested, there are two ways to use the radial artery as a graft. One way is sewing it onto the aorta and another is sewing it onto the mammary artery. It is unknown which technique is the superior revascularisation technique.
The NEO Trial is a randomised clinical trial with a 2?×?2 factorial design. We plan to randomise 300 participants into four intervention groups: (1) mammario-radial endoscopic group; (2) aorto-radial endoscopic group; (3) mammario-radial open surgery group; and (4) aorto-radial open surgery group.The hand function will be assessed by a questionnaire, a clinical examination, the change in cutaneous sensibility, and the measurement of both sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity at 3 months postoperatively. All the postoperative complications will be registered, and we will evaluate muscular function, scar appearance, vascular supply to the hand, and the graft patency including the patency of the central radial artery anastomosis. A patency evaluation by multi-slice computer tomography will be done at one year postoperatively.We expect the nerve conduction studies and the standardised neurological examinations to be able to discriminate differences in hand function comparing endoscopic to open harvest of the radial artery. The trial also aims to show if there is any patency difference between mammario-radial compared to aorto-radial revascularisation techniques but this objective is exploratory.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01848886.Danish Ethics committee number: H-3-2012-116.Danish Data Protection Agency: 2007-58-0015/jr.n:30-0838.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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