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Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304243
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
11-06-2020
Author
Sarah C Davidson
Gil Bohrer
Eliezer Gurarie
Scott LaPoint
Peter J Mahoney
Natalie T Boelman
Jan U H Eitel
Laura R Prugh
Lee A Vierling
Jyoti Jennewein
Emma Grier
Ophélie Couriot
Allicia P Kelly
Arjan J H Meddens
Ruth Y Oliver
Roland Kays
Martin Wikelski
Tomas Aarvak
Joshua T Ackerman
José A Alves
Erin Bayne
Bryan Bedrosian
Jerrold L Belant
Andrew M Berdahl
Alicia M Berlin
Dominique Berteaux
Joël Bêty
Dmitrijs Boiko
Travis L Booms
Bridget L Borg
Stan Boutin
W Sean Boyd
Kane Brides
Stephen Brown
Victor N Bulyuk
Kurt K Burnham
David Cabot
Michael Casazza
Katherine Christie
Erica H Craig
Shanti E Davis
Tracy Davison
Dominic Demma
Christopher R DeSorbo
Andrew Dixon
Robert Domenech
Götz Eichhorn
Kyle Elliott
Joseph R Evenson
Klaus-Michael Exo
Steven H Ferguson
Wolfgang Fiedler
Aaron Fisk
Jérôme Fort
Alastair Franke
Mark R Fuller
Stefan Garthe
Gilles Gauthier
Grant Gilchrist
Petr Glazov
Carrie E Gray
David Grémillet
Larry Griffin
Michael T Hallworth
Autumn-Lynn Harrison
Holly L Hennin
J Mark Hipfner
James Hodson
James A Johnson
Kyle Joly
Kimberly Jones
Todd E Katzner
Jeff W Kidd
Elly C Knight
Michael N Kochert
Andrea Kölzsch
Helmut Kruckenberg
Benjamin J Lagassé
Sandra Lai
Jean-François Lamarre
Richard B Lanctot
Nicholas C Larter
A David M Latham
Christopher J Latty
James P Lawler
Don-Jean Léandri-Breton
Hansoo Lee
Stephen B Lewis
Oliver P Love
Jesper Madsen
Mark Maftei
Mark L Mallory
Buck Mangipane
Mikhail Y Markovets
Peter P Marra
Rebecca McGuire
Carol L McIntyre
Emily A McKinnon
Tricia A Miller
Sander Moonen
Tong Mu
Gerhard J D M Müskens
Janet Ng
Kerry L Nicholson
Ingar Jostein Øien
Cory Overton
Patricia A Owen
Allison Patterson
Aevar Petersen
Ivan Pokrovsky
Luke L Powell
Rui Prieto
Petra Quillfeldt
Jennie Rausch
Kelsey Russell
Sarah T Saalfeld
Hans Schekkerman
Joel A Schmutz
Philipp Schwemmer
Dale R Seip
Adam Shreading
Mónica A Silva
Brian W Smith
Fletcher Smith
Jeff P Smith
Katherine R S Snell
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Diana V Solovyeva
Mathew S Sorum
Grigori Tertitski
J F Therrien
Kasper Thorup
T Lee Tibbitts
Ingrid Tulp
Brian D Uher-Koch
Rob S A van Bemmelen
Steven Van Wilgenburg
Andrew L Von Duyke
Jesse L Watson
Bryan D Watts
Judy A Williams
Matthew T Wilson
James R Wright
Michael A Yates
David J Yurkowski
Ramunas Žydelis
Mark Hebblewhite
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Date
11-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animal Migration
Animals
Archives
Arctic Regions
Ecological Parameter Monitoring
Population
Abstract
The Arctic is entering a new ecological state, with alarming consequences for humanity. Animal-borne sensors offer a window into these changes. Although substantial animal tracking data from the Arctic and subarctic exist, most are difficult to discover and access. Here, we present the new Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA), a growing collection of more than 200 standardized terrestrial and marine animal tracking studies from 1991 to the present. The AAMA supports public data discovery, preserves fundamental baseline data for the future, and facilitates efficient, collaborative data analysis. With AAMA-based case studies, we document climatic influences on the migration phenology of eagles, geographic differences in the adaptive response of caribou reproductive phenology to climate change, and species-specific changes in terrestrial mammal movement rates in response to increasing temperature.
PubMed ID
33154141 View in PubMed
Less detail

Forecasting spring from afar? Timing of migration and predictability of phenology along different migration routes of an avian herbivore.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272788
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2015 Jan;84(1):272-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Andrea Kölzsch
Silke Bauer
Rob de Boer
Larry Griffin
David Cabot
Klaus-Michael Exo
Henk P van der Jeugd
Bart A Nolet
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2015 Jan;84(1):272-83
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Arctic Regions
Europe
Female
Food chain
Geese - physiology
Male
Seasons
Abstract
Herbivorous birds are hypothesized to migrate in spring along a seasonal gradient of plant profitability towards their breeding grounds (green wave hypothesis). For Arctic breeding species in particular, following highly profitable food is important, so that they can replenish resources along the way and arrive in optimal body condition to start breeding early. We compared the timing of migratory movements of Arctic breeding geese on different flyways to examine whether flyways differed in the predictability of spring conditions at stopovers and whether this was reflected in the degree to which birds were following the green wave. Barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) were tracked with solar GPS/ARGOS PTTs from their wintering grounds to breeding sites in Greenland (N = 7), Svalbard (N = 21) and the Barents Sea (N = 12). The numerous stopover sites of all birds were combined into a set of 16 general stopover regions. The predictability of climatic conditions along the flyways was calculated as the correlation and slope between onsets of spring at consecutive stopovers. These values differed between sites, mainly because of the presence or absence of ecological barriers. Goose arrival at stopovers was more closely tied to the local onset of spring when predictability was higher and when geese attempted breeding that year. All birds arrived at early stopovers after the onset of spring and arrived at the breeding grounds before the onset of spring, thus overtaking the green wave. This is in accordance with patterns expected for capital breeders: first, they must come into condition; at intermediate stopovers, arrival with the food quality peak is important to stay in condition, and at the breeding grounds, early arrival is favoured so that hatching of young can coincide with the peak of food quality. Our results suggest that a chain of correlations between climatic conditions at subsequent stopovers enables geese to closely track the green wave. However, the birds' precision of migratory timing seems uninfluenced by ecological barriers, indicating partly fixed migration schedules. These might become non-optimal due to climate warming and preclude accurate timing of long-distance migrants in the future.
PubMed ID
25117616 View in PubMed
Less detail

Longer days enable higher diurnal activity for migratory birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311097
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2021 Mar 23; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-23-2021
Author
Ivan Pokrovsky
Andrea Kölzsch
Sherub Sherub
Wolfgang Fiedler
Peter Glazov
Olga Kulikova
Martin Wikelski
Andrea Flack
Author Affiliation
Department of Migration, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Radolfzell, Germany.
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2021 Mar 23; :
Date
Mar-23-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Seasonal geophysical cycles strongly influence the activity of life on Earth because they affect environmental conditions like temperature, precipitation and day length. An increase in daylight availability during summer is especially enhanced when animals migrate along a latitudinal gradient. Yet, the question of how day length (i.e. daylight availability) influences the activity patterns of long-distance, latitudinal migrants is still unclear. Here, we ask whether migration provides benefits to long-distance migrants by enabling them to increase their diurnal movement activities due to an increase in daylight availability. To answer this question, we tested whether four vastly different species of long-distance migratory birds-two arctic migrants and two mid-latitude migrants-can capitalise on day length changes by adjusting their daily activity. We quantified the relationship between daily activity (measured using accelerometer data) and day length, and estimated each species' daily activity patterns. In addition, we evaluated the role of day length as an ultimate driver of bird migration. All four species exhibited longer activity periods during days with more daylight hours, showing a strong positive relationship between total daily activity and day length. The slope of this relationship varied between the different species, with activity increasing 1.5-fold on average when migrating from wintering to breeding grounds. Underlying mechanisms of these relationships reveal two distinct patterns of daily activity. Flying foragers showed increasing activity patterns, that is, their daytime activities rose uniformly up to solar noon and decreased until dusk, thereby exhibiting a season-specific activity slope. In contrast, ground foragers showed a constant activity pattern, whereby they immediately increased their activity to a certain level and maintained this level throughout the day. Our study reveals that long days allow birds to prolong their activity and increase their total daily activity. These findings highlight that daylight availability could be an additional ultimate cause of bird migration and act as a selective agent for the evolution of migration.
Los ciclos geofísicos estacionales influyen fuertemente la actividad de la vida en la Tierra ya que afectan diversas condiciones ambientales como la temperatura, la precipitación y la duración del día. El aumento de la disponibilidad de luz solar durante el verano favorece especialmente a las especies que migran a lo largo de un gradiente latitudinal. Sin embargo, el efecto de la duración del día (es decir, la disponibilidad de luz solar) en los patrones de actividad de las especies que migran latitudinalmente largas distancias, aún no es claro. Aquí nos preguntamos si un aumento de la disponibilidad de luz solar representa un beneficio para los animales que migran largas distancias, al prolongar el periodo de actividad diurna. Para responder a esta pregunta, investigamos si cuatro especies diferentes de aves migratorias de larga distancia, dos migrantes árticos y dos migrantes de latitudes medias, pueden ajustar su actividad diaria y aprovechar los cambios en la duración del día. Cuantificamos la relación entre la actividad diaria (medida con datos de acelerómetro) y la duración del día, y estimamos los patrones de actividad de cada especie. Además, evaluamos el papel de la duración del día como mecanismo último subyacente a la migración de las aves. Las cuatro especies mostraron períodos de actividad más largos durante los días con más horas de luz, mostrando una fuerte relación positiva entre la actividad diaria total y la duración del día. Esta relación varió entre las especies evaluadas. La actividad aumentó en promedio 1.5 veces durante la migración desde las áreas de invernada a las áreas de reproducción. Los mecanismos subyacentes a estas relaciones revelan dos patrones de actividad diaria. Las especies que forrajean en vuelo mostraron un aumento en su patrón de actividad. En este caso, la actividad diurna aumentó uniformemente hasta el mediodía y disminuyó hasta el atardecer, mostrando una pendiente de actividad específica para la estación. De otro lado, las especies que forrajean en tierra mostraron un patrón de actividad constante. Según este patrón, la actividad diurna aumenta hasta un determinado nivel, a partir del cual se mantiene durante el resto del día. Nuestro estudio revela que el aumento en la longitud del día le permite a las aves prolongar su actividad e incrementar su actividad diaria total. Estos resultados señalan que la disponibilidad de luz diurna podría ser otro mecanismo último subyacente a la migración de las aves y puede actuar como un factor de selección en la evolución de la migración.
PubMed ID
33759198 View in PubMed
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Migratory herbivorous waterfowl track satellite-derived green wave index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269143
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108331
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mitra Shariatinajafabadi
Tiejun Wang
Andrew K Skidmore
Albertus G Toxopeus
Andrea Kölzsch
Bart A Nolet
Klaus-Michael Exo
Larry Griffin
Julia Stahl
David Cabot
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108331
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Analysis of Variance
Animal Migration
Animals
Biomass
Food Supply
Geese - physiology
Greenland
Herbivory - physiology
Least-Squares Analysis
Models, Biological
Plants
Russia
Seasons
Spacecraft
Svalbard
Abstract
Many migrating herbivores rely on plant biomass to fuel their life cycles and have adapted to following changes in plant quality through time. The green wave hypothesis predicts that herbivorous waterfowl will follow the wave of food availability and quality during their spring migration. However, testing this hypothesis is hampered by the large geographical range these birds cover. The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series is an ideal proxy indicator for the development of plant biomass and quality across a broad spatial area. A derived index, the green wave index (GWI), has been successfully used to link altitudinal and latitudinal migration of mammals to spatio-temporal variations in food quality and quantity. To date, this index has not been used to test the green wave hypothesis for individual avian herbivores. Here, we use the satellite-derived GWI to examine the green wave hypothesis with respect to GPS-tracked individual barnacle geese from three flyway populations (Russian n = 12, Svalbard n = 8, and Greenland n = 7). Data were collected over three years (2008-2010). Our results showed that the Russian and Svalbard barnacle geese followed the middle stage of the green wave (GWI 40-60%), while the Greenland geese followed an earlier stage (GWI 20-40%). Despite these differences among geese populations, the phase of vegetation greenness encountered by the GPS-tracked geese was close to the 50% GWI (i.e. the assumed date of peak nitrogen concentration), thereby implying that barnacle geese track high quality food during their spring migration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the migration of individual avian herbivores has been successfully studied with respect to vegetation phenology using the satellite-derived GWI. Our results offer further support for the green wave hypothesis applying to long-distance migrants on a larger scale.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25248162 View in PubMed
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