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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Aerobic working capacity of Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 18:764-768.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Hart, J.S.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology (Oslo)
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 18:764-768.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Pangnirtung
Maximum oxygen intake
Heart rate
Pulmonary ventilation efficiency
Lung function
Bicycle ergometer
Basal metabolic rate
Oxygen consumption
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1058.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 153.
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Comparison of Scandinavian Lapps, Arctic fishermen, and Canadian Arctic Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293849
Source
Federal Proceedings. 1963 May-Jun; 22:834-839
Publication Type
Journal
Date
1963

Hand circulation in the cold of Lapps and North Norwegian fisherman.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293846
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1960 Jul; 15:654-658.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1960
Author
Krog, J.
Folkow, B.
Fox, R.H.
Andersen, K.L.
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1960 Jul; 15:654-658.
Date
1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Biological phenomena
Cold Climate
Hand blood supply
Humans
Physiological Phenomena
PubMed ID
14412101 View in PubMed
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Metabolic and thermal response of Eskimos during muscular exertion in the cold

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 18(3):613-618
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 18(3):613-618
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Pangnirtung
Body temperature
Cold stress
Oxygen consumption
Skin temperature
Heart rate
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1004.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 282.
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Metabolic and thermal responses to muscular exertion in the cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298660
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-52. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Stromme, S.
Elsner, R.W.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology, Blindern, Oslo, Norway
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-52. 26 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2239939
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Metabolism
Heat production (biology)
Exercise
Exposure
Physiology
Abstract
The metabolic and thermal responses to muscular exertion in a cold environment were studied in outdoor and indoor workers. The metabolic rate in all subjects during exercise was higher in the cold environment than in the warm environment at low levels of work; at higher workloads it was the same. In the cold environment there was a tendency towards lower oxygen uptake of the outdoor workers than of the indoor workers at low levels of work; at high levels it was essentially the same. Differences in skin temperature and onset of rewarming indicate an adaptability to cold of the vasomotor control mechanism of the peripheral circulation. It is suggested that habituation to cold leads to a lower set point of the thermosensitive cells of the thermoregulatory center, so that vasodilation impulses are discharged at a lower temperature.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-52
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Metabolic and thermal response to a moderate cold exposure in nomadic Lapps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293845
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1960 Jul; 15:649-653.
Date
1960

Metabolism and temperature of Arctic Indian men during a cold night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293309
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1960 Jul; 15:635-644.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1960
Author
Irving, L.
Andersen, K.L.
Bolstad, A.
Elsner, R.
Hildes, J. A.
Loyning, Y.
Nelms, J.D.
Peyton, L.J.
Whaley, R. D.
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1960 Jul; 15:635-644.
Date
1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body temperture
Body physiology
Cold Temperature
Continental Population Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Male Metabolism
Abstract
During 7 hours of comfortably warm sleep, average metabolic rates of 11 Indian and 7 white men were alike. Since the Indians were 15% lighter their metabolic rates (MR's) referred to weight were greater. During a night at 0° with insufficient covering, MR's rose to 129% and 132% in the two groups. Cold caused equal myographic records of shivering (15% and 13% of records) and gross muscular movement appeared in 6.5% of the records for each group. Encephalograms showed that Indians slept more (51%) than whites (31%). Shivering was recorded in Indians and white men during encephalographic indications of sleep. Rectal temperatures of Indians declined about 0.5°. During cold nights skin on the bodies of all subjects cooled 3°–5° and about 15° on the feet. All subjects were disagreeably cold, but their cold sensations stimulated metabolic heat production only half as much as would be necessary to maintain fairly comfortable warmth.
PubMed ID
13717911 View in PubMed
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Physical fitness in terms of maximal oxygen intake of nomadic Lapps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298661
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-53. 32 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Elsner, R.E.
Saltin, B.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology, Oslo, Norway
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-53. 32 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2250845
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Lapps (Sami)
Physical Fitness
Oxygen consumption
Abstract
Physical fitness in terms of aerobic working capacity was measured in nomadic Lapps living in the northern part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Forty-nine men between 10 and 55 years of age and 21 girls were studied. Aerobic capacity was determined by measuring oxygen consumption during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Two or three submaximal loads were used. The maximal work lasted three to four minutes, during which time the subjects worked as hard as they could. Blood lactate taken after this heavy run showed that the oxygen requirement exceeded oxygen intake, thus indicating that maximal values for oxygen intake were achieved during this type of exercise.
The values for maximal oxygen intake of nomadic Lapps increased steadily from the age of 10 up to 18 years, from an average of 1. 4 liters/minute to about 3. 5 liters/minute . The latter value remained essentially unchanged up to the age of 30 in men. Maximum oxygen consumption then decreased to about 2. 5 liters/minute at. 50 years of age. No sex differences in maximum oxygen consumption were noted in subjects below 15 years of age.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-53
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Physical working capacity of arctic people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147
Source
Pages 159-169 in World Health Organization. Medicine and public health in the Arctic and Antarctic. Selected papers from a Conference, Geneva. Public Health Papers 18.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Andersen, K.L.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Work Physiology (Oslo)
Source
Pages 159-169 in World Health Organization. Medicine and public health in the Arctic and Antarctic. Selected papers from a Conference, Geneva. Public Health Papers 18.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Pangnirtung
Height
Weight
Maximum oxygen intake
Lung vital capacity
Tuberculosis
Cold adaptation
Pulmonary vital capacity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1057.
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Thermal and metabolic measurements on a reindeer at rest and in exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298767
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Houpt, T.R.
Andersen, K.L.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2430510
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Reindeer
Metabolism
Heat production (Biology)
Body temperature
Arctic Regions
Fur
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Abstract
Adaptations which equip a mammal to cope with the cold stresses of the Arctic environment must at the same time be accompanied by responses which enable it to dissipate large quantities of heat produced during exercise. Some aspects of the heat producing and heat dissipating mechanisms were investigated in the reindeer, an example of a large well adapted Arctic mammal. The oxygen consumption of a reindeer while standing quietly was 606 ml/minute; while pulling a heavily loaded sled, 2390 ml/minute. The evaporative heat loss from the respiratory tract of a standing reindeer was 12 kcal/hour, or seven percent of the heat production; of a vigorously exercising reindeer, 130 kcal/hour, or 20 percent of the heat production. The temperature of the air expired at the nostril was as low as 14° C when the reindeer was standing in a wind at -16° C, and about 30° C at ambient temperatures near 0° C. After the animal exercised, the nostril temperature was 35° to 37° C. The heat production of the rumen ingesta was found to be as high as 0.09 kcal/hour per kilogram of body weight soon after feeding, or 5% to 10% of the basal heat production. The average surface temperature of the thinly furred parts of the reindeer was 5° to 11° C above ambient temperature, the hoof temperature 5° to 9° above ambient and the thickly furred parts only 2° to 4° C above ambient when the reindeer was conserving heat during rest. On the other hand, during vigorous exercise the thinly furred surface was 18° to 22° C above ambient temperature, the hoof was 21° to 28° C above ambient, and the thickly furred surfaces 12° to 15° C above ambient.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-54
Documents
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14 records – page 1 of 2.