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Abstention, alcohol use and risk of myocardial infarction in men and women taking account of social support and working conditions: the SHEEP case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9623
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anders Romelsjö
Maria Branting
Johan Hallqvist
Lars Alfredsson
Niklas Hammar
Anders Leifman
Anders Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.romelsjo@sorad.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: Very few studies indicating that low-moderate alcohol consumption protects from myocardial infarction (MI) controlled for social support and working conditions, which could confound the findings. Therefore, a first aim was to study the risk of non-fatal and total MI in relation to volume of alcohol consumption and measures of social support and working conditions. A second aim was to analyse the impact of the volume of earlier alcohol use in abstainers. DESIGN: Data came from a case-control study, the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP), including first MI among Swedish citizens 45-70 years old. SETTING: Stockholm County 1992-94. PARTICIPANTS: There were 1095 cases of MI in men and 471 in women (928 and 372 were non-fatal), and 2339 living controls from the general population. MEASUREMENT: Information about alcohol use at different periods in life and job strain, social anchorage and life control besides pre-existing health problems, smoking, physical activity, socio-economic status and marital status was obtained by a questionnaire from the cases and the controls. FINDINGS: In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the relative risk for MI (especially non-fatal) was reduced among alcohol consumers. RR for non-fatal MI was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals 0.32, 0.85) in men with a consumption of 50-69.9 g 100% ethanol/day and 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.06, 0.77) in women with a consumption of 30 g or more per day (reference category 0.1-5 g 100% ethanol/day). Men who were abstainers during the previous 1-10 years and with an earlier average consumption of 5-30 g 100% ethanol/day had a significantly lower relative risk compared to such abstainers with an earlier higher consumption. Earlier consumption among abstainers may also have an impact on gender differences in MI. Analyses showed positive interaction between abstention and low life-control in women, but only 4% of the female cases were due to this interaction. There were no other interactions between measures of alcohol use and social anchorage, life control and working situations. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use had a protective impact on MI, with little impact of job strain, social anchorage and life control, giving increased support for a protective impact of low-moderate alcohol use. The level of previous alcohol consumption among male 1-10-year-long abstainers influenced the risk of MI.
PubMed ID
14519183 View in PubMed
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Adolescent alcohol use trajectories: Predictors and subsequent problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96369
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Sep;35(9):848-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Peter Wennberg
Anders Tengström
Anders Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. anna-karin.danielsson@ki.se
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Sep;35(9):848-52
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aimed at identifying different alcohol drinking trajectories in early to late adolescence. We also examined whether certain factors predicted membership of a specific trajectory and to what extent trajectory membership was linked to later negative consequences. Data were drawn from a longitudinal cohort study starting with 1923 adolescents including all seventh grade students in six school districts in Stockholm, Sweden 2001 (age 14), with follow-up in 2002, 2003, and 2006 (age 19). Cluster- and multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed four developmental pathways: low, gradually increasing, high, and suddenly increasing consumption. "High consumers" and "sudden increasers" reported higher levels of alcohol consumption, heavy episodic drinking, and alcohol-related problems both at age 14-16 and at age 19. The "gradual increasers" were more likely to smoke cigarettes, have easy access to alcohol, visit youth recreation centres, have friends who drink, and report a poorer health, compared to the "low consumer/abstainer group". "High consumers" were more likely to have drinking peers than both "low consumers/abstainers" and "gradual increasers".
PubMed ID
20626071 View in PubMed
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Adolescent alcohol use trajectories: Predictors and subsequent problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100225
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Jun 5;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2010
Author
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Peter Wennberg
Anders Tengström
Anders Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Jun 5;
Date
Jun-5-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aimed at identifying different alcohol drinking trajectories in early to late adolescence. We also examined whether certain factors predicted membership of a specific trajectory and to what extent trajectory membership was linked to later negative consequences. Data were drawn from a longitudinal cohort study starting with 1923 adolescents including all seventh grade students in six school districts in Stockholm, Sweden 2001 (age 14), with follow-up in 2002, 2003, and 2006 (age 19). Cluster- and multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed four developmental pathways: low, gradually increasing, high, and suddenly increasing consumption. "High consumers" and "sudden increasers" reported higher levels of alcohol consumption, heavy episodic drinking, and alcohol-related problems both at age 14-16 and at age 19. The "gradual increasers" were more likely to smoke cigarettes, have easy access to alcohol, visit youth recreation centres, have friends who drink, and report a poorer health, compared to the "low consumer/abstainer group". "High consumers" were more likely to have drinking peers than both "low consumers/abstainers" and "gradual increasers".
PubMed ID
20965110 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and coronary atherosclerosis progression--the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9388
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Imre Janszky
Kenneth J Mukamal
Kristina Orth-Gomér
Anders Romelsjö
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Bertil Svane
Richard L Kirkeeide
Murray A Mittleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Thoracic Division, Box 220, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Angina Pectoris
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of alcohol intake with progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Although moderate drinkers have a lower risk of coronary heart disease than abstainers, the relation of alcohol use and coronary atherosclerosis has not been well studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study, we evaluated 103 women, aged 65 years or younger, hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris who underwent serial quantitative coronary angiography 3-6 months following their index event and repeated an average of 3 years and 3 months (range 2-5 years) later. Individual alcoholic beverage consumption was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. We used mixed model analysis to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by mean luminal diameter change, controlling for age, smoking, body-mass index, education, physical activity, index cardiac event, menopausal status, diabetes, and history of dyslipidemia. Of the 93 women with complete information on alcohol intake, 14 consumed no alcohol (abstainers), 55 consumed up to 5 g of alcohol per day (light drinkers), and 24 consumed more than 5 g of alcohol per day (moderate drinkers). Coronary atherosclerosis progressed by a multivariate-adjusted average of 0.138 mm (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.027-0.249) among abstainers, 0.137 mm (95% CI: 0.057-0.217) among light drinkers, and -0.054 mm (95% CI: -0.154 to 0.047) among moderate drinkers (P
PubMed ID
15380454 View in PubMed
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Alcohol prices, beverage quality, and the demand for alcohol: quality substitutions and price elasticities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76088
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jan;30(1):96-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Paul J Gruenewald
William R Ponicki
Harold D Holder
Anders Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Prevention Research Center, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA. paul@prev.org
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jan;30(1):96-105
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - standards - supply & distribution
Choice Behavior
Commerce - economics
Economic Competition - economics
Humans
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Taxes - economics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although the published literature on alcohol beverage taxes, prices, sales, and related problems treats alcoholic beverages as a simple good, alcohol is a complex good composed of different beverage types (i.e., beer, wine, and spirits) and quality brands (e.g., high-, medium-, and low-quality beers). As a complex good, consumers may make substitutions between purchases of different beverage types and brands in response to price increases. For this reason, the availability of a broad range of beverage prices provides opportunities for consumers to mitigate the effects of average price increases through quality substitutions; a change in beverage choice in response to price increases to maintain consumption. METHODS: Using Swedish price and sales data provided by Systembolaget for the years 1984 through 1994, this study assessed the relationships between alcohol beverage prices, beverage quality, and alcohol sales. The study examined price effects on alcohol consumption using seemingly unrelated regression equations to model the impacts of price increases within 9 empirically defined quality classes across beverage types. The models enabled statistical assessments of both own-price and cross-price effects between types and classes. RESULTS: The results of these analyses showed that consumers respond to price increases by altering their total consumption and by varying their brand choices. Significant reductions in sales were observed in response to price increases, but these effects were mitigated by significant substitutions between quality classes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the net impacts of purposeful price policy to reduce consumption will depend on how such policies affect the range of prices across beverage brands.
PubMed ID
16433736 View in PubMed
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Association between use of sedatives or hypnotics, alcohol consumption, or other risk factors and a single injurious fall or multiple injurious falls: a longitudinal general population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9886
Source
Alcohol. 2002 Aug;28(1):9-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Marlene Stenbacka
Bjarne Jansson
Anders Leifman
Anders Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Magnus Huss Clinic, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. marlene.stenbacka@spo.sll.se
Source
Alcohol. 2002 Aug;28(1):9-16
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Poisson Distribution
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the association between risk factors, including use of sedatives or hypnotics or alcohol consumption, and injurious falls leading to hospitalization or death among 4023 subjects (1828 men and 2195 women) aged 20-89 years in Stockholm County, Sweden. Questionnaire data obtained from the 1984-1985 Stockholm Health of the Population Study (SHPS) were linked to official data registers on hospitalization and mortality. Of the 4023 subjects, 330 (121 men and 209 women) had been treated for or died of injurious falls during the 12-year follow-up period. High age was significantly associated with injurious falls among both men and women. Multivariate analyses showed that women who had used sedatives or hypnotics during the 2 weeks before an injurious fall were at increased risk [relative risk of 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.06)] for two or more injurious falls, but not for a single fall accident. High alcohol consumption and earlier self-reported injurious falls were significantly associated with injurious falls for women younger than 60 years of age and with earlier self-reported falls and living alone for men in the same age category. Among older women (>60 years of age), high alcohol consumption and use of sedatives or hypnotics were significantly associated with injurious falls, whereas living alone and earlier self-reported accidents were significant predictors for men in the same age category. These results support a cautious prescribing policy for sedatives and hypnotics, as well as an awareness of high alcohol consumption and its association with injurious falls.
PubMed ID
12377356 View in PubMed
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Does the prevention paradox apply to various alcohol habits and problems among Swedish adolescents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126687
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Dec;22(6):899-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anders Romelsjö
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.romelsjo@ki.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Dec;22(6):899-903
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol
Female
Habits
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevention paradox states that a majority of alcohol-related problems in a population come from moderate drinkers because they are more numerous than heavy drinkers, although the latter have a higher individual risk of adverse outcomes. We examined the extent to which the prevention paradox applies to the relationship between alcohol consumption, heavy episodic drinking (HED) and alcohol-related problems in adolescents; an area in which studies are lacking.
A total of 7288 alcohol-consuming adolescents aged 13-17 years were examined. The proportions (%) of problems related to drinking measures [the upper 10% and bottom 90% of drinkers by annual alcohol intake, and those with frequent (monthly), less frequent, and no heavy drinking episodes] were calculated.
The bottom 90% of consumers by annual intake accounted for a large majority of the alcohol-related problems among boys and girls at all ages. The share of problems accounted for by monthly HEDs increased with age, from ~10% among those aged 13 years to >50% among those aged 17 years. Attributable proportions for the top 10% alcohol consumers ranged between 22% and 37%.
Our analyses suggest that the prevention paradox is valid for adolescent boys and girls aged =15 years and applies to a large range of alcohol-related problems of varying severity. Our results imply that not only that prevention directed at all adolescents is essential, but also that HED should be particularly noticed.
PubMed ID
22366386 View in PubMed
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Few middle-aged women with severe mental symptoms use psychotropic drugs: the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9084
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):384-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jenny Rundberg
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsioe
Anders Romelsjö
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm University, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@psykiatr.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):384-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: In a population of middle-aged women a survey was carried out to ascertain the prevalence of mental symptoms and psychotropic drug use, and further to investigate whether severe mental symptoms are associated with social situation, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical health. METHODS: All women (n = 10,766) aged 50-59 years and living in the Lund area were invited to the WHILA study, a health survey including laboratory examinations and a self-administered questionnaire; 6,917 (64.2%) participated. This study is based on the questionnaire only. RESULTS: During the past three months 25.4% (n = 1,709) had been troubled by none or 1 mental symptom (labelled "absent/slight"), 52.8% (n = 3,555) by 2-6 mental symptoms ("moderate") and 21.8% (n = 1,471) by 7-10 mental symptoms ("severe"). Among women with severe mental symptoms 15.4% regularly used psychotropic drugs, mainly antidepressants. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that women with severe mental symptoms had higher odds for living alone (OR 1.7; CI 1.3-2.2) or as single parents (OR 2.1; CI 1.2-3.6), being university-educated (OR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.0), being on long-term sick-leave (OR 8.8; CI 3.0-25.5), using hormone replacement therapy (OR 1.3; CI 1.1-1.6), and having severe physical symptoms (136.8; CI 89.2-209.7) compared with women with absent/slight mental symptoms. CONCLUSION: Mental symptoms were common among the participating women. The presence of severe mental symptoms was strongly associated with severe physical symptoms. Few women with severe mental symptoms used psychotropic drugs. Middle-aged women with severe mental symptoms need to be identified and provided with appropriate psychopharmacological, hormonal, and/or psychosocial treatment.
PubMed ID
16267887 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in the prediction of parental servings of alcohol to adolescents and youth drunkenness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264495
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2014 Dec;49(14):1857-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anna K Strandberg
Maria C Bodin
Anders Romelsjö
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2014 Dec;49(14):1857-66
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Schools
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This longitudinal study, funded by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, explored gender differences in predictors of parental servings of alcohol to youth and youth drunkenness. Data were collected from 1,752 Swedish 7th-grade youth and their parents, at three occasions between 2007 and 2010. Measurements included youth alcohol use, parental warmth, and parental control. Two-level logistic regressions showed that 15-year-old girls are more likely to be served alcohol at home compared to boys, and that there are some gender differences in predictors of drunkenness. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed and areas for future research identified.
PubMed ID
24832724 View in PubMed
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Heavy Episodic Drinking in Early Adolescence: Gender-Specific Risk and Protective Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100229
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2010 Oct 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2010
Author
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Anders Romelsjö
Anders Tengström
Author Affiliation
1Department for Social Medicine, Institution for Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2010 Oct 21;
Date
Oct-21-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This longitudinal study examined possible gender differences regarding risk and protective factors for heavy episodic drinking among 1,222 seventh-grade students (aged 13) in the City of Stockholm, Sweden, with follow-up 2 years later. Logistic regression analyses showed that several factors predicted heavy episodic drinking. The strongest predictors for boys' heavy episodic drinking in the ninth grade were heavy episodic drinking (odds ratio [OR] = 5.30) and smoking in the seventh grade (OR = 5.80). Drinking peers (OR = 2.47) and smoking (OR = 2.44) in the seventh grade showed the strongest association for girls. Furthermore, high parental monitoring and having a secure attachment to parents may have a protective effect when risk factors are present. Our results lend support to prevention initiatives to strengthen the parent-child relation and focus on adolescents' ability to resist peer pressure and of limiting parental provision of alcohol. The study's limitations are noted.
PubMed ID
20964532 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.