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A behavioral ecology approach to traffic accidents: interspecific variation in causes of traffic casualties among birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101738
Source
Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2011 Apr;32(2):115-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Anders Pape Møller
Helga Erritzøe
Johannes Erritzøe
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Systematics and Evolution, University of Paris-South, Orsay Cedex, France. anders.moller@u-psud.fr
Source
Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2011 Apr;32(2):115-27
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Birds - classification - physiology
Death
Ecology - methods
Ecosystem
Models, Biological
Phylogeny
Risk factors
Abstract
Birds and other animals are frequently killed by cars, causing the death of many million individuals per year. Why some species are killed more often than others has never been investigated. In this work hypothesized that risk taking behavior may affect the probability of certain kinds of individuals being killed disproportionately often. Furthermore, behavior of individuals on roads, abundance, habitat preferences, breeding sociality, and health status may all potentially affect the risk of being killed on roads. We used information on the abundance of road kills and the abundance in the surrounding environment of 50 species of birds obtained during regular censuses in 2001-2006 in a rural site in Denmark to test these predictions. The frequency of road kills increased linearly with abundance, while the proportion of individuals sitting on the road or flying low across the road only explained little additional variation in frequency of road casualties. After having accounted for abundance, we found that species with a short flight distance and hence taking greater risks when approached by a potential cause of danger were killed disproportionately often. In addition, solitary species, species with a high prevalence of Plasmodium infection, and species with a large bursa of Fabricius for their body size had a high susceptibility to being killed by cars. These findings suggest that a range of different factors indicative of risk-taking behavior, visual acuity and health status cause certain bird species to be susceptible to casualties due to cars.
PubMed ID
21509957 View in PubMed
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Heterogeneity in stable isotope profiles predicts coexistence of populations of barn swallows Hirundo rustica differing in morphology and reproductive performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63347
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2004 Jul 7;271(1546):1355-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-2004
Author
Anders Pape Møller
Keith A Hobson
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Parasitologie Evolutive, CNRS UMR 7103, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Bâtiment A, 7ème étage, 7 quai St Bernard, Case 237, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05, France. amoller@snv.jussieu.fr
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2004 Jul 7;271(1546):1355-62
Date
Jul-7-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animal Migration
Animals
Body constitution
Body Weights and Measures
Carbon Isotopes - metabolism
Comparative Study
Denmark
Deuterium - metabolism
Feathers - chemistry
Immunity, Cellular - immunology
Litter Size
Models, Biological
Nitrogen Isotopes - metabolism
Phenotype
Population Dynamics
Reproduction - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Songbirds - anatomy & histology - metabolism - physiology
South Africa
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Tarsus, Animal - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Population studies assume that individuals belonging to a study population are homogeneous for natal and breeding origin, although this assumption is rarely tested. We tested for heterogeneity in stable-isotope profiles (delta15N, delta13C, deltaD) of feathers grown in the African winter quarters from a Danish breeding population of adult barn swallows, Hirundo rustica. Deuterium isotope values did not provide useful information on population segregation of wintering swallows in Africa. However, both delta15N and delta13C values showed a clearly bimodal distribution with 6% belonging to one category and the remaining birds belonging to another category, resulting in this population comprising three categories of birds. Adults belonging to the two categories of delta13C isotope profiles differed weakly in morphology for several different characters. The frequency and the size of second broods differed between categories of delta13C isotope profiles. Phenotypes of nestlings from the first brood in terms of tarsus length, body mass and T-cell response differed significantly between the two delta15N isotope categories, suggesting that conditions during winter carried over to the breeding season at least as late as the first brood. Polymorphism can be maintained only if fitness is similar for birds from categories of isotope profiles. We suggest that fluctuating selection or migration-selection balance may maintain the observed polymorphism.
PubMed ID
15306333 View in PubMed
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Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279393
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 15;6:22969
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2016
Author
Mario Xavier Ruiz-González
Gábor Árpád Czirják
Pierre Genevaux
Anders Pape Møller
Timothy Alexander Mousseau
Philipp Heeb
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 15;6:22969
Date
Mar-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacteria - classification - genetics - radiation effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Feathers - microbiology - radiation effects
Female
Gamma Rays
Male
Microbial Viability - radiation effects
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation, Ionizing
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Ukraine
Abstract
Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different ? radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to ? radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26976674 View in PubMed
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