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Health effects of a subway environment in mild asthmatic volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130509
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jan;106(1):25-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Anna Klepczynska-Nyström
Britt-Marie Larsson
Johan Grunewald
Charlotte Pousette
Anders Lundin
Anders Eklund
Magnus Svartengren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, 4th floor, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden. anna.klepczynska-nystrom@ki.se
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jan;106(1):25-33
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - immunology
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - blood - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Flow Cytometry
Forkhead Transcription Factors - immunology
Humans
Lung - immunology - metabolism - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - immunology
Particle Size
Railroads
Sweden - epidemiology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
Particle exposure is known to have negative health effects. In Stockholm the environment in the subway has been reported to have higher particle exposure levels, measured as PM(2.5) and PM(10), than roads with intense traffic in the inner city area. We have recently shown that healthy volunteers exposed to subway environment had statistically significant increase of fibrinogen and CD4 cells expressing regulatory T-cell marker CD25(bright)/FOXP3 in blood. The aim of the present study was to find out whether a more vulnerable population, asthmatics, would demonstrate similar or other changes in the lungs or in the peripheral blood. Sixteen mild asthmatics were exposed to a subway and a control environment for 2 h while being monitored by measurements of lung function, and inflammatory response in the lower airways evaluated by bronchoscopy and in peripheral blood. An attempt to standardize the exposures was done, by letting the volunteers alternate 15 min intervals of moderate exercise on a bicycle ergometer with 15 min of rest. We found a statistically significant increased frequency of CD4 cells expressing T-cell activation marker CD25 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but no significant increase of regulatory T-cells in blood as was found in healthy volunteers. Our study shows that airway inflammatory responses after exposure in subway environment differ between asthmatic and healthy humans.
PubMed ID
21996054 View in PubMed
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Late coronary complications after arterial switch operation and their treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143249
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Dec 1;76(7):1027-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2010
Author
Milad El-Segaier
Anders Lundin
Peter Hochbergs
Peeter Jögi
Erkki Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. milad.el-segaier@med.lu.se
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Dec 1;76(7):1027-32
Date
Dec-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - instrumentation
Asymptomatic Diseases
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Child
Collateral Circulation
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Circulation
Coronary Occlusion - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Coronary Stenosis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Echocardiography
Humans
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prosthesis Design
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Transposition of Great Vessels - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To report the late coronary complications and their treatment after arterial switch operation (ASO).
Asymptomatic patients after ASO may have coronary ostial stenosis or obstruction.
Since 1980, 279 patients were operated with ASO. At the time of preparing this article, selective follow-up coronary angiograms were done on 81 patients.
Coronary stenosis was found in six patients. A 6-year-old patient with left coronary artery (LCA) ostial stenosis and a 9-year-old patient with conus branch occlusion had good collaterals without a need for further treatment. One patient with LCA obstruction, myocardial infarction, and left ventricular failure was operated with osteoplasty at age of 16 years. In three essentially asymptomatic patients, stenting of LCA ostium stenosis was done: in two of them with drug-eluting stents at 9 and 10 years of age and in one with bare-metal stent at 18 years of age. One of these patients was earlier treated with balloon dilatation at 5 years of age which caused intimal dissection.
Asymptomatic patients with an uneventful course after ASO may have coronary obstruction. This necessitates follow-up coronary evaluation in all patients. Stenting of the coronary arteries is an option for treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Dec 1;76(7):1033-421108379
PubMed ID
20506518 View in PubMed
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Local infiltration analgesia versus intrathecal morphine for postoperative pain management after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132397
Source
Anesth Analg. 2011 Oct;113(4):926-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Per Essving
Kjell Axelsson
Elisabeth Åberg
Henrik Spännar
Anil Gupta
Anders Lundin
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. per.essving@orebroll.se
Source
Anesth Analg. 2011 Oct;113(4):926-33
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic Agonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amides - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Analgesia - adverse effects - methods
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Analysis of Variance
Anesthetics, Local - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Double-Blind Method
Early Ambulation
Epinephrine - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Injections, Spinal
Ketorolac - administration & dosage
Knee Joint - physiopathology - surgery
Length of Stay
Male
Morphine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Local infiltration analgesia (LIA)--using a combination of local anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and epinephrine, injected periarticularly during surgery-has become popular in postoperative pain management after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared intrathecal morphine with LIA after TKA.
In this double-blind study, 50 patients scheduled to undergo TKA under spinal anesthesia were randomized into 2 groups: group M, 0.1 mg morphine was injected intrathecally together with the spinal anesthetic and in group L, LIA using ropivacaine, ketorolac, and epinephrine was infiltrated in the knee during the operation, and 2 bolus injections of the same mixture were given via an intraarticular catheter postoperatively. Postoperative pain, rescue analgesic requirements, mobilization, and home readiness were recorded. Patient-assessed health quality was recorded using the Oxford Knee Score and EQ-5D during 3 months follow-up. The primary endpoint was IV morphine consumption the first 48 postoperative hours.
Mean morphine consumption was significantly lower in group L than in group M during the first 48 postoperative hours: 26 ± 15 vs 54 ± 29 mg, i.e., a mean difference for each 24-hour period of 14.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.6 to 20.9) mg. Pain scores at rest and on movement were lower during the first 48 hours in group L than in group M (P
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012 Aug 15;94(16):1511-323162858
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2011 Oct;113(4):684-621948277
PubMed ID
21821506 View in PubMed
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Multiple chemical sensitivity in male painters; a controlled provocation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45864
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Antonis Georgellis
Birgitta Lindelöf
Anders Lundin
Bengt Arnetz
Lena Hillert
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. antonis.georgellis@smd.sll.se
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Paint - adverse effects
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether male painters reporting multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) differ from their matched controls (male painters without such sensitivity) during controlled chamber challenges to singular and mixtures of odorous chemicals with respect to: (1) Subjective rating of symptoms (i.e., symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) and symptoms related to irritation) and sensations of smell elicited by low-level chemical exposures. (2) Changes in serum prolactin and cortisol levels, changes in nasal cavity and eye redness as a result of the various exposures. Moreover, background assessments were made regarding mental well-being, sense of coherence (SOC) as well as state of anxiety and depression in both groups. The MCS and control group consisted of 14 and 15 male painters respectively. Regarding background assessments of mental well-being, anxiety, depression and SOC, statistically significant differences were obtained between painters with MCS and their controls. During the controlled chamber challenges, neither difference regarding sensations of smell nor development of CNS related symptoms were seen between MCS and control group. In contrast, subjective rating of symptoms related to irritation (i.e., eyes, nose, throat, skin, and breathing difficulties) was significant higher in subjects with MCS. No differences between the groups as a result of the different exposures were seen concerning nasal cavity, eye redness and serum cortisol levels. However, a trend (P = 0.056) between the groups was measured regarding a decline of serum prolactin levels in the MCS group. This is a relatively small study with a limited number of volunteers; and no definitive conclusions can be drawn concerning the above findings. But it is the first controlled challenge study that incorporates similarly exposed groups (painters) recruited from a community rather than from a clinical population.
PubMed ID
14626900 View in PubMed
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