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Predictors and course of health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93091
Source
Mov Disord. 2008 Jul 30;23(10):1420-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2008
Author
Forsaa Elin Bjelland
Larsen Jan Petter
Wentzel-Larsen Tore
Herlofson Karen
Alves Guido
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. bjellandforsaa@gmail.com
Source
Mov Disord. 2008 Jul 30;23(10):1420-7
Date
Jul-30-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - psychology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hallucinations - etiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - psychology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Single-Blind Method
Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic - etiology - psychology
Social Isolation
Abstract
We investigated how health related quality of life (HRQL) changes over time in a population-based cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and which factors predict a lower level of HRQL in these patients. Of 227 patients with PD assessed at baseline and followed prospectively, information on HRQL-status was obtained in 111 subjects 4 years and 82 patients 8 years after inclusion. HRQL was measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). Analyses were conducted using generalized estimating equation models. The NHP total score (P
PubMed ID
18512757 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy in Parkinson's disease: a community-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91976
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2009 May;15(4):295-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Pedersen Kenn Freddy
Larsen Jan Petter
Alves Guido
Aarsland Dag
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. pekf@sus.no
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2009 May;15(4):295-9
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community-Based Participatory Research
Depression - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy in a population-based sample of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to assess whether apathy may present as a primary behavioural disturbance independent from depression and cognitive impairment. A total of 232 patients derived from an epidemiological study of PD in Rogaland county, Western Norway, completed a comprehensive evaluation of motor, cognitive, and depressive symptoms. Apathy was assessed with the motivation/initiative item of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The majority of the population had mild to moderate PD with mean disease duration of 9.1+/-5.7 years. Apathy was diagnosed in 38% of the 232 patients. In 11% of the total sample apathy coexisted with depression and dementia, whereas 10% had apathy and depression without dementia, 6.5% apathy and dementia without depression, and 9% were apathetic without dementia or depression (data missing in 1.5% patients). Apathy was significantly associated with higher depression scores, lower cognitive functioning, and more severe motor symptoms. When excluding patients with depression, dementia, cognitive impairment with no dementia (population-based age- and education-corrected norms for the Mini-Mental State Examination), and those using psychotropic medication, 5% of the 232 patients had apathy. In conclusion, our study shows that apathy is common in the general PD population, may present as an independent behavioural disorder, and suggests that apathy in PD may be related to dysfunction of the nigro-striatal pathway or that brain pathology underlying apathy and progression of motor symptoms develops in parallel.
PubMed ID
18801696 View in PubMed
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