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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
relation to lifestyle and genetic factors View project Alastair B Ross Chalmers University of Technology 99 PUBLICATIONS   2,772 CITATIONS    SEE PROFILE Asa Johansson Uppsala University 329 PUBLICATIONS   13,964 CITATIONS    SEE PROFILE Sven Hassler University of Gothenburg 25 PUBLICATIONS
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Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
Documents
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Higher intake of fish and fat is associated with lower plasma s-adenosylhomocysteine: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293475
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Mads V Lind
Lotte Lauritzen
Oluf Pedersen
Henrik Vestergaard
Ken D Stark
Torben Hansen
Alastair B Ross
Mette Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: madslind@nexs.ku.dk.
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Healthy Diet
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Principal Component Analysis
Risk
S-Adenosylhomocysteine - blood
Seafood
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Several B-vitamins act as co-factors in one-carbon metabolism, a pathway that plays a central role in several chronic diseases. However, there is a lack of knowledge of how diet affects markers in one-carbon metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore dietary patterns and components associated with one-carbon metabolites. We hypothesized that intake of whole-grains and fish would be associated with lower Hcy, and higher SAM:SAH ratio due to their nutrient content. We assessed dietary information using a four-day dietary record in 118 men and women with features of the metabolic syndrome. In addition we assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition and plasma alkylresorcinols. Plasma s-adenosylmethionine (SAM), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin B12 was included as one-carbon metabolism markers. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to explore dietary patterns and multiple linear regression models to examine associations between dietary factors and one-carbon metabolites. PCA separated subjects based on prudent and unhealthy dietary patterns, but the dietary pattern score was not related to the one-carbon metabolites. Whole grain intake was found to be inversely associated to plasma Hcy (-4.7% (-9.3; 0.0), P=.05) and total grain intake tended to be positively associated with SAM and SAH (2.4% (-0.5; 5.5), P=.08; 5.8% (-0.2; 12.1), P=.06, respectively, per SD increase in cereal intake). Fish intake was inversely associated with plasma Hcy and SAH concentrations (-5.4% (-9.7; -0.8), P=.02 and -7.0% (-12.1; -1.5), P=.01, respectively) and positively associated with the SAM:SAH ratio (6.2% (1.6; 11.0), P=.008). In conclusion, intake and fish and whole-grain appear to be associated with a beneficial one-carbon metabolism profile. This indicates that dietary components could play a role in regulation of one-carbon metabolism with a potential impact on disease prevention.
PubMed ID
29129471 View in PubMed
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Intake of alkylresorcinols from wheat and rye in the United Kingdom and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61453
Source
Br J Nutr. 2005 Oct;94(4):496-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Alastair B Ross
Wulf Becker
Yan Chen
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Per Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@lmv.slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2005 Oct;94(4):496-9
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Bread
Diet
Female
Food analysis
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Resorcinols - analysis
Secale cereale
Seeds
Sweden
Triticum
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols, phenolic lipids present in high amounts in whole-grain wheat and rye but not present in appreciable amounts in other foods, are candidates as biomarkers of whole-grain intake from these cereals. We estimated the intake of alkylresorcinols in Sweden and the UK using two different methods: food supply data (FSD); food consumption data (FCD; based on individual and household survey data). The average per capita intake of alkylresorcinols in Sweden was 17.5 mg/d (FSD) and 22.9 (sd 16.6) mg/d (FCD), while in the UK it was 11.9 mg/d (FSD) and 11.8 (sd 18.62) mg/d (FCD). Ninety-six per cent of all Swedes consumed some alkylresorcinols, compared with 50 % of British people surveyed. Both women and men over the age of 40 years had a higher alkylresorcinol intake than younger people. The average results from the two methods were similar, but the FCD data provided more detail about the range of alkylresorcinol intake, and indicate that because the intake of alkylresorcinols varies so widely, they may be good markers of diets rich or poor in whole-grain wheat/rye products.
PubMed ID
16197572 View in PubMed
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Low-phytate wholegrain bread instead of high-phytate wholegrain bread in a total diet context did not improve iron status of healthy Swedish females: a 12-week, randomized, parallel-design intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303020
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Mar; 58(2):853-864
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Michael Hoppe
Alastair B Ross
Cecilia Svelander
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Lena Hulthén
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Nutrition Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. michael.hoppe@nutrition.gu.se.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Mar; 58(2):853-864
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bread - statistics & numerical data
Diet - methods
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Iron - blood
Phytic Acid - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Reference Values
Sweden
Whole Grains - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the effects of eating wholegrain rye bread with high or low amounts of phytate on iron status in women under free-living conditions.
In this 12-week, randomized, parallel-design intervention study, 102 females were allocated into two groups, a high-phytate-bread group or a low-phytate-bread group. These two groups were administered: 200 g of blanched wholegrain rye bread/day, or 200 g dephytinized wholegrain rye bread/day. The bread was administered in addition to their habitual daily diet. Iron status biomarkers and plasma alkylresorcinols were analyzed at baseline and post-intervention.
Fifty-five females completed the study. In the high-phytate-bread group (n?=?31) there was no change in any of the iron status biomarkers after 12 weeks of intervention (p?>?0.05). In the low-phytate bread group (n?=?24) there were significant decreases in both ferritin (mean?=?12%; from 32?±?7 to 27?±?6 µg/L, geometric mean?±?SEM, p?
PubMed ID
29796932 View in PubMed
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Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment (NICE): a prospective birth cohort in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295566
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 Oct 21; 8(10):e022013
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-21-2018
Author
Malin Barman
Fiona Murray
Angelina I Bernardi
Karin Broberg
Sven Bölte
Bill Hesselmar
Bo Jacobsson
Karin Jonsson
Maria Kippler
Hardis Rabe
Alastair B Ross
Fei Sjöberg
Nicklas Strömberg
Marie Vahter
Agnes E Wold
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Anna Sandin
Author Affiliation
Food and Nutrition Science, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 Oct 21; 8(10):e022013
Date
Oct-21-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Prenatal and neonatal environmental factors, such as nutrition, microbes and toxicants, may affect health throughout life. Many diseases, such as allergy and impaired child development, may be programmed already in utero or during early infancy. Birth cohorts are important tools to study associations between early life exposure and disease risk. Here, we describe the study protocol of the prospective birth cohort, 'Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment' (NICE). The primary aim of the NICE cohort is to clarify the effect of key environmental exposures-diet, microbes and environmental toxicants-during pregnancy and early childhood, on the maturation of the infant's immune system, including initiation of sensitisation and allergy as well as some secondary outcomes: infant growth, obesity, neurological development and oral health.
The NICE cohort will recruit about 650 families during mid-pregnancy. The principal inclusion criterion will be planned birth at the Sunderby Hospital in the north of Sweden, during 2015-2018. Questionnaires data and biological samples will be collected at 10 time-points, from pregnancy until the children reach 4?years of age. Samples will be collected primarily from mothers and children, and from fathers. Biological samples include blood, urine, placenta, breast milk, meconium, faeces, saliva and hair. Information regarding allergic heredity, diet, socioeconomic status, lifestyle including smoking, siblings, pet ownership, etc will be collected using questionnaires. Sensitisation to common allergens will be assessed by skin prick testing and allergic disease will be diagnosed by a paediatrician at 1 and 4?years of age. At 4?years of age, the children will also be examined regarding growth, neurobehavioural and neurophysiological status and oral health.
The NICE cohort has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå, Sweden (2013/18-31M). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and communicated on scientific conferences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30344169 View in PubMed
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Plasma Alkylresorcinols Reflect Gluten Intake and Distinguish between Gluten-Rich and Gluten-Poor Diets in a Population at Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283015
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Oct;146(10):1991-1998
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Mads V Lind
Mia L Madsen
Jüri J Rumessen
Henrik Vestergaard
Rikke J Gøbel
Torben Hansen
Lotte Lauritzen
Oluf B Pedersen
Mette Kristensen
Alastair B Ross
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Oct;146(10):1991-1998
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Celiac Disease - blood - diet therapy
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet, Gluten-Free
Energy intake
Female
Glutens - administration & dosage - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Resorcinols - blood
Risk factors
Self Report
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Many patients with celiac disease experience difficulties in adherence to a gluten-free diet. Methods for testing compliance to a gluten-free diet are costly and cumbersome. Thus, a simple biomarker of gluten intake is needed in a clinical setting and will be useful for epidemiologic studies investigating wider effects of gluten intake.
The aim was to evaluate plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations as a measure of gluten intake.
In this randomized, controlled, crossover intervention study in 52 Danish adults with features of the metabolic syndrome, we compared 8 wk of a gluten-rich and gluten-poor diet separated by a washout period of =6 wk. We measured fasting plasma concentrations of alkylresorcinols to determine if they reflected differences in gluten intake as a secondary outcome of the original study. In addition, we investigated in 118 Danish adults the cross-sectional association between self-reported gluten intake and plasma alkylresorcinols in the same and a similar study at baseline. We used mixed-model ANCOVA for examining treatment effects, a classification tree to determine compliance to the gluten-poor diet, and linear regression models for examining baseline correlation between plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations and gluten intake.
Plasma total alkylresorcinols decreased more during the gluten-poor period (geometric mean: -124.8 nmol/L; 95% CI: -156.5, -93.0 nmol/L) than in the gluten-rich period (geometric mean: -31.8 nmol/L; 95% CI: -63.1, -0.4 nmol/L) (P
PubMed ID
27629576 View in PubMed
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Whole grain compared with refined wheat decreases the percentage of body fat following a 12-week, energy-restricted dietary intervention in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126766
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):710-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mette Kristensen
Søren Toubro
Morten Georg Jensen
Alastair B Ross
Giancarlo Riboldi
Michela Petronio
Susanne Bügel
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. mekr@life.ku.dk.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):710-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Aged
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Defecation
Denmark
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Flour - analysis
Food Handling
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - diet therapy
Overweight - blood - diet therapy
Patient compliance
Postmenopause
Resorcinols - blood
Triticum - chemistry
Weight Loss
Abstract
Observational studies show inverse associations between intake of whole grain and adiposity and cardiovascular risk; however, only a few dietary intervention trials have investigated the effect of whole-grain consumption on health outcomes. We studied the effect of replacing refined wheat (RW) with whole-grain wheat (WW) for 12 wk on body weight and composition after a 2-wk run-in period of consumption of RW-containing food intake. In this open-label randomized trial, 79 overweight or obese postmenopausal women were randomized to an energy-restricted diet (deficit of ~1250 kJ/d) with RW or WW foods providing 2 MJ/d. Body weight and composition, blood pressure, and concentration of circulating risk markers were measured at wk 0, 6, and 12. Fecal output and energy excretion were assessed during run-in and wk 12. Plasma alkylresorcinol analysis indicated good compliance with the intervention diets. Body weight decreased significantly from baseline in both the RW (-2.7 ± 1.9 kg) and WW (-3.6 ± 3.2 kg) groups, but the decreases did not differ between the groups (P = 0.11). The reduction in body fat percentage was greater in the WW group (-3.0%) than in the RW group (-2.1%) (P = 0.04). Serum total and LDL cholesterol increased by ~5% (P
PubMed ID
22357746 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.