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Declining Well-Being in Young Swedes Born in 1990 Versus 1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289962
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Mar; 60(3):306-312
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Ebba Brann
John E Chaplin
Monica Leu Agelii
Agneta Sjöberg
Aimon Niklasson
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ebba.brann@gu.se.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Mar; 60(3):306-312
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Body Height
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Self Concept
Self Report
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
Well-being is affected by the environment, including societal changes. In this study, specific dimensions of well-being were compared in two cohorts of Swedish adolescents born 16 years apart.
Two groups of 18-year-olds, "Grow up Gothenburg" 1974 and 1990 birth cohorts, completed a self-reported questionnaire including the Gothenburg Well-Being in adolescence scale (GWBa). In addition, height and weight were measured, resulting in 4,362 participants (1974 birth cohort) and 5,151 participants (1990 birth cohort) with age, height, weight, and well-being data. The GWBa consists of a total score and five dimensions: mood, physical condition, energy, self-esteem, and stress balance.
Total well-being was significantly lower in the later-born cohort, and the greatest difference was seen for the dimension stress balance (feeling calm, unconcerned, unstressed, and relaxed), although effect sizes were modest. In both boys and girls, well-being was lower for all dimensions in the later-born cohort, with the exception of Self-esteem in girls, which was higher in the later-born cohort. In both cohorts, boys reported higher well-being than girls for all dimensions. The mean body mass index z-score was higher in boys from the later-born cohort, but after adjusting for weight status, the differences in well-being between the cohorts persisted.
Well-being was lower in the later-born cohort, particularly for the dimension stress balance. Differences were not explained by the shift in weight status indicating that other societal changes have had an impact on well-being levels. Managing high levels of stress might be an area of intervention in adolescents for improved well-being.
PubMed ID
27993460 View in PubMed
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Growth in very preterm children: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30784
Source
Pediatr Res. 2003 Dec;54(6):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Aimon Niklasson
Eva Engstrom
Anna-Lena Hard
Kerstin Albertsson Wikland
Ann Hellstrom
Author Affiliation
Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Centre, Department of Pediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, S-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. aimon.niklasson@vgregion.se
Source
Pediatr Res. 2003 Dec;54(6):899-905
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The knowledge about the long-term growth of very preterm children in relation to gestational age at birth is incomplete. Therefore, a retrospective study of longitudinal growth from birth to 7 y of age in 52 of 56 surviving children who were born at a gestational age of
PubMed ID
12930904 View in PubMed
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Influence of insulin-like growth factor I and nutrition during phases of postnatal growth in very preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101886
Source
Pediatr Res. 2011 May;69(5 Pt 1):448-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ingrid Hansen-Pupp
Chatarina Löfqvist
Staffan Polberger
Aimon Niklasson
Vineta Fellman
Ann Hellström
David Ley
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. ingrid.pupp@skane.se
Source
Pediatr Res. 2011 May;69(5 Pt 1):448-53
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage
Betamethasone - administration & dosage
Biological Markers - blood
Body Height
Body Size
Body Weight
Breast Feeding
Cephalometry
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Gestational Age
Head - growth & development
Humans
Hydrocortisone - administration & dosage
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood - growth & development
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk Proteins - administration & dosage
Nutritional Status
Nutritional Support
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Pronounced growth restriction (GR) occurs after very preterm birth. The interaction between IGF-I, nutritional intake, and growth was evaluated prospectively in 64 infants with a mean (SD) GA of 25.7 (1.9) wk. Blood sampling of IGF-I and measurements of weight, length, and head circumference were performed weekly until discharge. Daily calculation of nutritional intake was performed. Standard deviation scores (SDSs) for growth parameters defined two growth phases: GR phase (birth until lowest SDS) and catch-up (CU) phase (lowest SDS until 35 gestational weeks). IGF-I concentrations during the first postnatal weeks were low and increased at 30 wk GA, irrespective of GA at birth, coinciding with initiation of CU growth. Concentrations of IGF-I were positively associated with change in weight SDS during the GR phase, p = 0.001 and CU phase, p = 0.004-0.027. Protein and energy intake were not associated with change in SDS weight during the GR phase as opposed to the CU phase (p
PubMed ID
21263374 View in PubMed
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Influence of maternal, obstetric and fetal risk factors on the prevalence of birth asphyxia at term in a Swedish urban population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58469
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Oct;81(10):909-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Ian Milsom
Lars Ladfors
Klara Thiringer
Aimon Niklasson
Anders Odeback
Eva Thornberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Göteborg University, Sweden. Ian.Milsom@obgyn.gu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Oct;81(10):909-17
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Asphyxia Neonatorum - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetus - physiopathology
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - epidemiology
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Perinatal care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The influence of maternal, obstetric and fetal risk factors on the prevalence of birth asphyxia at term in a Swedish urban population. OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors for Apgar score-defined birth asphyxia, birth asphyxia with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and birth asphyxia-related death/disability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective case-control study in term neonates with birth asphyxia defined as Apgar score
PubMed ID
12366480 View in PubMed
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Insight into human pubertal growth by applying the QEPS growth model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286276
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2017 Apr 19;17(1):107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2017
Author
Anton Holmgren
Aimon Niklasson
Lars Gelander
A Stefan Aronson
Andreas F M Nierop
Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2017 Apr 19;17(1):107
Date
Apr-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - physiology
Child
Female
Growth Charts
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Biological
Puberty - physiology
Sweden
Abstract
Computerized mathematical models describing absolute and relative individual growth during puberty in both cm and standard deviation (SD)-scores are lacking. The present study aimed to fill this gap, by applying the QEPS-model that delineates mathematically the specific pubertal functions of the total growth curve.
Study population used was the individual growth curves of the longitudinally followed cohort GrowUp1974 Gothenburg (n = 2280). The QEPS-model describes total height as (T)otal-function: a combination of four shape-invariant growth functions, modified by time-scale and height-scale parameters: a (Q)uadratic-function for the continuous growth from fetal life to adulthood; a negative (E)xponential-function adds the rapid, declining fetal/infancy growth; a (P)ubertal-function the specific pubertal growth spurt; a (S)top-function the declining growth until adult height. A constructed variable, MathSelect, was developed for assessing data-quality. CIs and SD-scores for growth estimates were calculated for each individual. QEPS-model estimates used for pubertal growth; from the T-function: onset of puberty as minimal height velocity (AgeT ONSET ); mid-puberty as peak height velocity (AgeT PHV ); end of puberty as height velocity decreased to 1 cm/year (AgeT END ); duration of different intervals and gain (AgeT ONSET-END and Tpubgain); from the P-function: onset of puberty, estimated as growth at 1% or 5% (AgeP1 , AgeP5); mid-puberty as 50% (AgeP50) and PHV (AgeP PHV ); end of pubertal growth at 95 or 99% (AgeP95, AgeP99); duration of different intervals and pubertal gain (Ppubgain; P max ); from the QES-function: gain (QESpubgain) . RESULTS: Application of these mathematical estimates for onset, middle and end of puberty of P-function, QES-function, and T-function during puberty showed: the later the onset of puberty, the greater the adult height; pubertal gain due to the P-function growth was independent of age at onset of puberty; boys had higher total gain during puberty due to P-function growth than to QES-function growth; for girls it was reversed.
QEPS is the first growth model to provide individualized estimates of both the specific pubertal growth function and the total growth during puberty, with accompanying SD-scores and Cis for each individual. These QEPS-derived estimates enable more in-depth analysis of different aspects of pubertal growth than previously possible.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28424059 View in PubMed
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Low birth weight is a risk factor for severe retinopathy of prematurity depending on gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264255
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e109460
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Pia Lundgren
Anna Kistner
Eva M Andersson
Ingrid Hansen Pupp
Gerd Holmström
David Ley
Aimon Niklasson
Lois E H Smith
Carolyn Wu
Ann Hellström
Chatarina Löfqvist
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e109460
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Retinopathy of Prematurity - epidemiology - pathology
Risk factors
Sweden
Term Birth
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of low birth weight as a risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) that will require treatment in correlation with gestational age at birth (GA).
In total, 2941 infants born
Notes
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PubMed ID
25330287 View in PubMed
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Maternal and neonatal factors associated with poor early weight gain and later retinopathy of prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133232
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Dec;100(12):1528-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Margareta Hök Wikstrand
Anna-Lena Hård
Aimon Niklasson
Lois Smith
Chatarina Löfqvist
Ann Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Dec;100(12):1528-33
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - diagnosis
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Male
Neonatal Screening - methods
Pilot Projects
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Respiration, Artificial - adverse effects
Retinopathy of Prematurity - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden
Time
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
To identify factors associated with poor early weight gain as reflected in an alarm system, WINROP, and risk of later proliferative retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in infants with gestational age (GA)
PubMed ID
21726282 View in PubMed
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Medical follow-up study of 5-year-old ICSI children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30222
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2004 Jul;9(1):91-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Maryse Bonduelle
Christina Bergh
Aimon Niklasson
Gianpiero D Palermo
Ulla-Britt Wennerholm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Genetics, Dutch-Speaking University Hospital of Brussels, Laarbeeklaan, 101, 1090 Brussels, Belgium.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2004 Jul;9(1):91-101
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Belgium
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Child Development - physiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Infant
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are still a matter of concern. The purposes of the present study were to investigate the physical outcome in 5-year-old children born after ICSI and compare them with children born after spontaneous conception. Three hundred singleton children from Belgium, Sweden and the USA, born after ICSI, were matched by maternal age, child age and gender. In one centre, matching was also performed for maternal education. The main end-point was growth. Secondary end-points were general health, e.g. common diseases, chronic illnesses, surgical interventions and physical/neurological examinations. Standard deviation scores assessed growth. Growth assessed as stature at follow-up was similar in the two groups, despite a higher rate of preterm birth and low birth weight in the ICSI children. Common diseases and chronic illnesses occurred at similar rates in both groups. More ICSI children underwent surgical interventions and required other therapy e. g. physiotherapy and dietary therapy. Physical/neurological examinations revealed few abnormalities in either group. In conclusion, infertility treatment by ICSI does not adversely affect growth during childhood. The children's general health seems satisfactory.
Notes
Comment In: Reprod Biomed Online. 2004 Jul;9(1):10-215257809
PubMed ID
15257828 View in PubMed
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A novel splicing mutation causes an undescribed type of analbuminemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58568
Source
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2002 Jan 2;1586(1):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2-2002
Author
Monica Campagnoli
Antonio Rossi
Lars Palmqvist
Anders Flisberg
Aimon Niklasson
Lorenzo Minchotti
Monica Galliano
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, A. Castellani, Università di Pavia, Italy.
Source
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2002 Jan 2;1586(1):43-9
Date
Jan-2-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consensus Sequence
Female
Genotype
Heteroduplex Analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Mutation
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
RNA Splicing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serum Albumin - deficiency - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Analbuminemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the absence or severe reduction of circulating serum albumin in homozygous subjects. In this report we describe a new molecular defect that caused the analbuminemic trait in a newborn of Iraqi origin. When the parents' DNA was analyzed, both subjects were found to be heterozygous for the same mutation found in the infant. All the 14 exon and flanking intron sequences of the albumin gene were amplified via PCR and screened for mutations by SSCP and heteroduplex analysis. A mutation in the DNA region encoding exon 1 and its flanking intron was revealed by the presence of a heteroduplex. The fragment, which was directly DNA sequenced, contains a previously unreported single nucleotide change, consisting in a G to A substitution at nucleotide 118 in the structural gene of the human protein. This mutation, involving the first base of intron 1, destroys the GT dinucleotide consensus sequence found at the 5' end of most intervening sequences and causes the defective pre-mRNA splicing responsible for the analbuminemic trait.
PubMed ID
11781148 View in PubMed
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Population-based waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio reference values in preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149660
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Oct;98(10):1632-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Josefine Roswall
Stefan Bergman
Gerd Almqvist-Tangen
Bernt Alm
Aimon Niklasson
Andreas F M Nierop
Jovanna Dahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden. josefine.roswall@lthalland.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Oct;98(10):1632-6
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - standards
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Overweight - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To establish new reference values for measurements of waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio in preschool children.
A population-based, cross-sectional study of 4502 children aged 0-5 years derived from child health care in a Swedish county. Measurements of weight, height and waist circumference were recorded using a standardized procedure.
New reference values for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio for preschool children are presented. Reference charts were constructed and are presented. Waist circumference increased with age (r = 0.80, p
PubMed ID
19604174 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.