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Clinical severity and prognosis of hand eczema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89139
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2009 Jun;160(6):1229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Hald M.
Agner T.
Blands J.
Veien N K
Laurberg G.
Avnstorp C.
Menné T.
Kaaber K.
Kristensen B.
Kristensen O.
Andersen K E
Paulsen E.
Thormann J.
Sommerlund M.
Nielsen N H
Johansen J D
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. marhal02@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2009 Jun;160(6):1229-36
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hand eczema (HE) is a frequent, long-lasting disease with both personal and societal repercussions. Consequently, more information is needed on factors that maintain symptoms. OBJECTIVES: In this study, patients with HE were followed for 6 months from the first visit to a dermatologist to identify factors associated with severe disease and a poor prognosis. METHODS: Study participants were 799 patients with HE from nine dermatological clinics in Denmark. Severity assessment of the HE was done at baseline and at the 6-month follow-up using the Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI) and by patients using a self-administered photographic guide. Additional information was obtained from a baseline questionnaire. RESULTS: At baseline, 60.3% assessed their HE as moderate to very severe using the self-administered photographic guide compared with 36.1% at follow-up. The mean HECSI value decreased from 19.9 points at baseline to 11.2 points at follow-up (P or = 1 positive patch test (P
PubMed ID
19416249 View in PubMed
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Incidence of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort: genetic and environmental risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87775
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2007 Sep;157(3):552-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Lerbaek A.
Kyvik K O
Ravn H.
Menné T.
Agner T.
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Ledreborg Allé 40, 1., 2820 Gentofte, Denmark. anne.lerbaek@dadlnwt.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2007 Sep;157(3):552-7
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Contact - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Twins
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Population-based studies on the incidence of hand eczema are sparse. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective follow-up study was to determine the incidence rate of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort. Secondly, the role of genetic factors and other potential risk factors for hand eczema was investigated. METHODS: A questionnaire on self-reported hand eczema was answered by 5610 and 4128 twin individuals in 1996 and 2005, respectively. Data were analysed in a Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS: The crude incidence rate was 8.8 cases per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, [CI] 7.7-9.9). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) dependent on the co-twin's hand eczema status revealed a significant, doubled risk for monozygotic twin individuals with a co-twin affected by hand eczema, compared with dizygotic twin individuals with a co-twin affected by hand eczema (IRR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4-4.1). Also, significantly increased IRRs were found for positive patch test, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. CONCLUSIONS: Hand eczema is still a frequent disease and genetic factors are confirmed important risk factors. Positive patch test, atopic dermatitis and wet work were associated with an increased risk, whereas no association with age, sex, smoking or alcohol was found.
PubMed ID
17635505 View in PubMed
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Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95290
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2009 Jun;160(6):1286-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Skov L.
Halkjaer L B
Agner T.
Frimodt-Møller N.
Jarløv J O
Bisgaard H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Allergology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2009 Jun;160(6):1286-91
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Staphylococcal Skin Infections - epidemiology
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study participants were 356 children born of mothers with asthma from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood. Swabs from the vestibulum nasi and the perineum were cultured at 1 month and 1 year, from acute eczema, and from parents (vestibulum nasi and pharynx). AD development and severity were monitored prospectively. RESULTS: Of the neonates, 5.3% had positive swabs for S. aureus cultured from the vestibulum nasi (51.3%) and/or the perineum (11.3%). Forty-two per cent developed AD, but without association between colonization with S. aureus at 1 month of age and risk of developing AD at 3 years of age. There was a 70% concordance for S. aureus carriage between neonates and parents. At 1 year of age 11.3% children had swabs positive for S. aureus. Fourteen per cent of children tested at the 1-year visit developed AD after the visit but before 3 years of age, but again, there was no association between colonization with S. aureus and the risk of AD. In children seen at acute visits the severity of AD measured by scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was significantly higher in children with a positive culture for S. aureus in lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Colonization with S. aureus at 1 month of age is not associated with an increased risk of developing AD during the first 3 years of life.
PubMed ID
19239467 View in PubMed
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Use of complementary and alternative treatment for allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84372
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2007 Aug;157(2):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Noiesen E.
Munk M D
Larsen K.
Høyen M.
Agner T.
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Niels Andersensvej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. rstoag@ra.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2007 Aug;157(2):301-5
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Complementary Therapies - psychology - utilization
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - therapy
Educational Status
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies show that use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequent among dermatological patients in general and that the use of CAM is linked to disease severity and duration. OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors influencing the use of CAM and visits to alternative practitioners among patients with allergic contact dermatitis. METHODS: The study was a postal questionnaire survey among 485 patients with allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances and preservatives in consumer products. The questionnaire included questions about use of conventional treatment, use of CAM and visits to alternative therapists. It also included questions about eczema severity and duration as well as social factors. The patients were recruited from one dermatological clinic in the capital city area and two clinics in smaller cities. RESULTS: The response rate was 79%. Forty per cent of respondents were users of CAM, predominantly in combination with conventional treatment, and 29% had visited an alternative practitioner. Women were found to be significantly more frequent users of CAM and visitors to alternative practitioners than men, and patients from urban/rural districts reported more frequent use of CAM than patients from the capital city area. Frequent eczema eruptions, hand eczema, long duration of disease and work-related problems were positively associated with use of CAM and/or visits to alternative practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: The typical CAM user is female, lives in a rural district or town (not the capital area), has long disease duration and often work-related problems. Overall, the use of CAM is not an alternative to conventional treatment, but is a supplement.
PubMed ID
17573876 View in PubMed
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