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-160C/A polymorphism in the E-cadherin gene promoter and risk of hereditary, familial and sporadic prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17926
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2004
Author
Jonsson B-A
Adami H-O
Hägglund M
Bergh A
Göransson I
Stattin P
Wiklund F
Grönberg H
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Date
Apr-10-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadherins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The E-cadherin (CDH1) gene has been associated with prostate carcinogenesis. The C/A polymorphism--160 base pairs relative to the transcription start site has been shown to decrease gene transcription. We analyzed the association between this polymorphism and the risk of sporadic, familial (2 close relatives) and hereditary (3 or more close relatives) prostate cancer. We combined data from 3 population-based epidemiologic studies in Sweden encompassing altogether 1,036 prostate cancer cases and 669 controls that were genotyped for the short nucleotide polymorphism. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated through unconditional logistic regression. We found no significant association between the A-allele and sporadic (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2) or familial (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.9-2.2) prostate cancer. In contrast, risk of hereditary cancer was increased among heterozygote CA carriers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.7) and particularly among homozygote AA carriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.4-4.9). Our data indicate that the -160 single nucleotide polymorphism in CDH1 is a low-penetrant prostate cancer susceptibility gene that might explain a proportion of familial and notably hereditary prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
14961571 View in PubMed
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Benign prostatic hyperplasia and subsequent risk of bladder cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77840
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1475-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-7-2007
Author
Kang D.
Chokkalingam A P
Gridley G.
Nyren O.
Johansson J E
Adami H O
Silverman D.
Hsing A W
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7234, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1475-9
Date
May-7-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We evaluated the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort of 79,280 Swedish men hospitalised for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register between 1964 and 1983 and followed until 1989 via multiple record linkages with nationwide data on cancer registry, death and emigration. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), the ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of incident bladder cancers, were used to calculate the risk associated with BPH. The expected number was calculated by multiplying the number of person-years by the age-specific cancer incidence rates in Sweden for each 5-year age group and calendar year of observation. Analyses were stratified by BPH treatment, latency, calendar year and presence of genitourinary (GU) comorbid conditions. After excluding the first 3 years of follow-up after the index hospitalisation, we observed 506 incident bladder cancer cases during follow-up in the cohort. No overall increased risk of bladder cancer was apparent in our main analysis involving the entire BPH cohort. However, among BPH patients with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), there was an increased risk in all follow-up periods; SIRs of bladder cancer during years 4-6 of follow-up was 1.22 (95% confidence interval=1.02-1.46), 1.32 for 7-9 years of follow-up, and 1.47 for 10-26 years of follow-up. SIRs of bladder cancer among TURP-treated BPH patients were particularly elevated among those with comorbid conditions of the GU tract (e.g., stone, infection, etc.); 1.72, 1.74 and 2.01 for 4-6, 7-9, 10-26 years of follow-up, respectively, and also for those whose diagnoses occurred before 1975, when TURP was more likely to be performed by a urologist than a general practitioner: 1.87, 1.90 and 1.74, respectively. These findings suggest that BPH overall is not associated with bladder cancer risk. However, among men treated with TURP, particularly those with other comorbid GU tract conditions, risk of bladder cancer was elevated.
PubMed ID
17473820 View in PubMed
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Childhood social environment and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in adults

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84537
Source
Cancer Res. 2007 Nov 15;67(22):11074-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Smedby, KE
Hjalgrim, H
Chang, ET
Rostgaard, K
Glimelius, B
Adami, H-O
Melbye, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Res. 2007 Nov 15;67(22):11074-82
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Environment
Female
Humans
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - diagnosis - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Better hygiene and sanitation and decreasing family size parallel the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in many populations around the world. However, whether sibship size, birth order, and crowding are related to adult NHL risk is not clear. We investigated how family structure and childhood social environment were related to the risk of NHL and NHL subtypes in a large Scandinavian population-based case control study with 6,242 participants aged 18 to 74 years. Detailed exposure information was obtained through telephone interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using logistic regression, and all statistical tests were two-sided. Having four or more siblings was associated with a moderately increased risk of NHL, compared with having no siblings (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.62, P(trend)
PubMed ID
18006854 View in PubMed
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Dietary fat and breast cancer risk in the Swedish women's lifestyle and health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85203
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Dec 3;97(11):1570-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2007
Author
Löf M.
Sandin S.
Lagiou P.
Hilakivi-Clarke L.
Trichopoulos D.
Adami H-O
Weiderpass E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, PO 281, Stockholm SE-171 77, Sweden. marie.lof@ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Dec 3;97(11):1570-6
Date
Dec-3-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Receptors, Progesterone - metabolism
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated whether dietary intakes of total fat, monounsaturated fat (MUFA), polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) and saturated fat (SFA) were associated with breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of 49 261 Swedish women (30-49 years at enrolment), which yielded 974 breast cancer cases by December 2005. Further, we evaluated if associations differed by oestrogen and/or progesterone receptor tumour status. Total fat, MUFA, PUFA or SFA were not associated with risk overall. However, women in the highest MUFA and PUFA quintile intake had a reduced breast cancer risk after age 50 years (hazard ratios: 95% confidence interval=0.45: 0.25-0.99 and 0.54: 0.35-0.85, respectively) compared to women in the lowest quintile. The associations did not differ by oestrogen or progesterone receptor status. Despite the negative findings, type of fat during premenopausal years may have later differential effects on risk.
PubMed ID
17940510 View in PubMed
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Infectious mononucleosis, childhood social environment, and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78606
Source
Cancer Res. 2007 Mar 1;67(5):2382-2388
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2007
Author
Hjalgrim, H
Smedby, KE
Rostgaard, K
Molin, D
Hamilton-Dutoit, S
Chang, ET
Ralfkiaer, E
Sundström, C
Adami, H-O
Glimelius, B
Melbye, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, University of Copenhagen, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. hhj@ssi.dk
Source
Cancer Res. 2007 Mar 1;67(5):2382-2388
Date
Mar-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - isolation & purification
Hodgkin Disease - etiology - virology
Humans
Infectious Mononucleosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Infectious mononucleosis (IM) has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), implicating a role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in HL development. Although essential to the understanding of the association, it has remained uncertain if the relationship is restricted to the EBV-positive subset of HL. We collected information on mononucleosis history and childhood socioenvironmental characteristics in a population-based study of 586 patients with classic HL and 3,187 controls in Denmark and Sweden. Tumor EBV status was established for 499 cases by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques. Odds ratios (OR) for the relationship between HL risk and mononucleosis and other risk factors were estimated by logistic regression for HL in younger (18-44 years) and older (45-74 years) adults, overall and by tumor EBV status. All analyses were adjusted for country-specific measures of maternal education and mononucleosis history. IM was associated with an increased risk of EBV-positive [OR, 3.23; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.89-5.55] but not EBV-negative HL (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.86-2.14). Risk of EBV-positive HL varied with time since IM and was particularly pronounced in younger adults (OR, 3.96; 95% CI, 2.19-7.18). IM-associated lymphomas occurred with a median of 2.9 years (1.8-4.9 years) after infection. The EBV specificity of the IM association was corroborated by a case-case comparison of IM history between younger adult EBV-positive and EBV-negative HL patients (OR(IM EBV+ HL versus EBV- HL), 2.68; 95% CI, 1.40-5.12). We found further evidence that IM is associated only with EBV-positive HL. This finding is compatible with the notion that EBV-positive and EBV-negative HL may have different etiologies.
PubMed ID
17332371 View in PubMed
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A longitudinal Swedish study on screening for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma: evidence of effectiveness and overtreatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93835
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2641-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Gunnell Anthony S
Ylitalo Nathalie
Sandin Sven
Sparén Pär
Adami H-O
Ripatti Samuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 281, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. anthony.gunnell@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2641-8
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Organized Papanicolaou (Pap) screening has markedly reduced the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the potential for overtreatment of precursor lesions is quite high for SCC, and the effectiveness of Pap screening for prevention of cervical adenocarcinoma is questionable. METHODS: Using the nationwide, virtually complete Swedish Cancer Register, we analyzed standardized incidence rates for SCC in situ (CIS), SCC, adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and adenocarcinoma, between 1968 and 2002. For each county, we calculated Spearman correlations between incidence of in situ lesions and incidence of invasive cancer, 5, 10, and 15 years later. We also used generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to compare adjusted estimates for associations between in situ incidences and invasive carcinomas over counties. RESULTS: The overall decrease in SCC incidence in Sweden following the introduction of cervical screening confirms the beneficial nature of cervical screening on SCC incidence over the last 30 years. A similar benefit was not apparent for adenocarcinoma. GEE estimates for the relative change in SCC for an increase of 100 CIS cases per 100,000 women-years were 1.05 for the 5-year and 1.02 for the 10-year lag periods. For adenocarcinoma and AIS, similar analyses gave corresponding estimates of 1.17 for the 5-year and 1.08 for the 10-year lag periods. The lack of an inverse correlation suggests that increased reported incidence of CIS in certain counties did not forecast a reduction in SCC for those counties. CONCLUSION: Our data confirm the effectiveness of Pap smear screening in reducing the incidence of SCC, but suggest no clear benefit on adenocarcinoma. Our data also suggest that relaxed histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of cervical CIS may increase its recorded incidence with no measurable benefit in the reduction of invasive cancer.
PubMed ID
18086769 View in PubMed
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Low carbohydrate-high protein diet and mortality in a cohort of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78269
Source
J Intern Med. 2007 Apr;261(4):366-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Lagiou P.
Sandin S.
Weiderpass E.
Lagiou A.
Mucci L.
Trichopoulos D.
Adami H-O
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens Medical School, Goudi, Athens, Greece. plagiou@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
J Intern Med. 2007 Apr;261(4):366-74
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects - mortality
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The long-term health consequences of diets used for weight control are not established. We have evaluated the association of the frequently recommended low carbohydrate diets - usually characterized by concomitant increase in protein intake - with long-term mortality. DESIGN: The Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort study initiated in Sweden during 1991-1992, with a 12-year almost complete follow up. SETTING: The Uppsala Health Care Region. SUBJECTS: 42,237 women, 30-49 years old at baseline, volunteers from a random sample, who completed an extensive questionnaire and were traced through linkages to national registries until 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We evaluated the association of mortality with: decreasing carbohydrate intake (in deciles); increasing protein intake (in deciles) and an additive combination of these variables (low carbohydrate-high protein score from 2 to 20), in Cox models controlling for energy intake, saturated fat intake and several nondietary covariates. RESULTS: Decreasing carbohydrate or increasing protein intake by one decile were associated with increase in total mortality by 6% (95% CI: 0-12%) and 2% (95% CI: -1 to 5%), respectively. For cardiovascular mortality, amongst women 40-49 years old at enrolment, the corresponding increases were, respectively, 13% (95% CI: -4 to 32%) and 16% (95% CI: 5-29%), with the additive score being even more predictive. CONCLUSIONS: A diet characterized by low carbohydrate and high protein intake was associated with increased total and particularly cardiovascular mortality amongst women. Vigilance with respect to long-term adherence to such weight control regimes is advisable.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2007 Apr;261(4):363-517391110
PubMed ID
17391111 View in PubMed
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Neonatal growth and breast cancer risk in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91808
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 Nov 4;99(9):1544-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
Lagiou P.
Hsieh C-C
Trichopoulos D.
Adami H-O
Hall P.
Chie L.
Ekbom A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 Nov 4;99(9):1544-8
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn - growth & development
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
Birth size of a woman has been positively associated with her breast cancer risk, particularly before menopause, but no study has investigated neonatal growth in relation to this risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within a population-based cohort of women, born in Sweden between 1901 and 1961, covering all 405 breast cancer patients and 1081 age- and hospital-matched controls, who were born after newborn charts became available. Compared to neonates who lost /=200 g after birth or grew >/=25 g day(-1) after nadir, or both, were at an approximately 50% increased breast cancer risk. The excess risk was striking and statistically significant among women below 50 years of age, but was not evident among older women. Immediate postnatal weight loss (an indicator of water loss, likely to reflect water retention associated with pregnancy hormones) as well as neonatal weight gain rate after the nadir (known to reflect growth hormone levels) was significantly positively associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
18827810 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of body size and risk for stroke amongst women below age 60.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80224
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Nov;260(5):442-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Lu M.
Ye W.
Adami H-O
Weiderpass E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ming.lu@meb.ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Nov;260(5):442-50
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height - physiology
Body Size - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cerebrovascular accident - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The relation between obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, and risk of stroke amongst women remains unclear. In 1991-1992, a prospective study was initiated in Sweden amongst women who returned a self-administered questionnaire. Through linkage with nation-wide registries, 45,449 women, free of stroke at entry, were followed up until diagnosis of first incident stroke, death, or the end of follow-up in 2002. We estimated multivariate relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from Cox proportional hazards regression models. A total of 170 incident stroke cases occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. The RR of stroke amongst women in the highest compared with the lowest quintile was 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.2; P for trend 0.04) for waist-to-hip ratio, 2.5 (95% CI 1.5-4.3; P for trend 0.01) for waist-to-height ratio and 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.3; P for trend 0.02) for waist circumference. Adjustment for hypertension and diabetes attenuated these risk estimates. In contrast, birth weight, body mass index (BMI) at age 18, BMI at entry, weight change in adulthood and adult height were not significantly associated with risk of stroke. This study provides evidence that, in contrast to BMI, several different measures of abdominal obesity are strong predictors of stroke in women.
PubMed ID
17040250 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.