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Applicability of energy-positive net-zero water management in Alaska: technology status and case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297642
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Tingting Wu
James D Englehardt
Tianjiao Guo
Lucien Gassie
Aaron Dotson
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 5000 Technology Drive, Huntsville, AL, 35899, USA. Tingting.Wu@uah.edu.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cities
Drinking Water
Humans
Population Density
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - methods
Water Purification - economics - methods
Water Supply - economics
Abstract
Challenges of water and wastewater management in Alaska include the potential need for above-grade and freeze-protected piping, high unit energy costs and, in many rural areas, low population density and median annual income. However, recently developed net-zero water (NZW), i.e., nearly closed-loop, direct potable water reuse systems, can retain the thermal energy in municipal wastewater, producing warm treated potable water without the need for substantial water re-heating, heat pumping or transfer, or additional energy conversion. Consequently, these systems are projected to be capable of saving more energy than they use in water treatment and conveyance, in the temperate USA. In this paper, NZW technology is reviewed in terms of potential applicability in Alaska by performing a hypothetical case study for the city of Fairbanks, Alaska. Results of this paper study indicate that in municipalities of Alaska with local engineering and road access, the use of NZW systems may provide an energy-efficient water service option. In particular, case study modeling suggests hot water energy savings are equivalent to five times the energy used for treatment, much greater savings than in mid-latitudes, due largely to the substantially higher energy needed for heating water from a conventional treatment system and lack of need for freeze-protected piping. Further study of the applicability of NZW technology in cold regions, with expanded evaluation in terms of system-wide lifecycle cost, is recommended.
PubMed ID
29168139 View in PubMed
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Benzotriazole Enrichment in Snowmelt Discharge Emanating from Engineered Snow Storage Facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275155
Source
Water Environ Res. 2016 Jun;88(6):510-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Josh K Alvey
Birgit Hagedorn
Aaron Dotson
Source
Water Environ Res. 2016 Jun;88(6):510-20
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Environmental monitoring
Freezing
Seasons
Snow - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Triazoles - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Snowpacks in urban environments can retain a high load of anthropogenic contaminants that, upon melting, can deliver concentrated contaminant pulses into the aquatic environment. In climates with an extended period of snowfall accumulation, such as in Anchorage, Alaska, contaminant amplification within meltwater may affect aquatic ecosystem health. A spatiotemporal study of benzotriazoles on snow, meltwater and soils was performed in association with three urban snow disposal facilities. Benzotriazole elution from engineered snow disposal sites behaved similarly to inorganic salt and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during the initial melt period, with maximum concentrations between 2.23-7.39 µg/L; similar enrichment was observed in creeks. Assays of disposal site soils revealed the presence of tolytriazole. Furthermore, using fluorescence spectroscopy and PARAFAC analysis, a modeled component representative of benzotriazoles was identified, a possible indicator of anthropogenic input rather than a unique indicator for benzotriazole compounds.
PubMed ID
27225781 View in PubMed
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The search for an alternative to piped water and sewer systems in the Alaskan Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281068
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2017
Author
Korie A Hickel
Aaron Dotson
Timothy K Thomas
Mia Heavener
Jack Hébert
John A Warren
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Date
Mar-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Forty-two communities in rural Alaska are considered unserved or underserved with water and sewer infrastructure. Many challenges exist to provide centralized piped water and sewer infrastructure to the homes, and they are exacerbated by decreasing capital funding. Unserved communities in rural Alaska experience higher rates of disease, supporting the recommendation that sanitation infrastructure should be provided. Organizations are pursuing alternative solutions to conventional piped water and sewer in order to maximize water use and reuse for public health. This paper reviews initiatives led by the State of Alaska, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, and the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation to identify and develop potential long-term solutions appropriate and acceptable to rural communities. Future developments will likely evolve based on the lessons learned from the initiatives. Recommendations include Alaska-specific research needs, increased end-user participation in the design process, and integrated monitoring, evaluation, and information dissemination in future efforts.
PubMed ID
28353111 View in PubMed
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The search for an alternative to piped water and sewer systems in the Alaskan Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297767
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32873-32880
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Korie A Hickel
Aaron Dotson
Timothy K Thomas
Mia Heavener
Jack Hébert
John A Warren
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4500 Diplomacy Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. khickel@anthc.org.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32873-32880
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Drinking Water
Family Characteristics
Humans
Public Health
Recycling - trends
Rural Population
Sanitation
Sewage
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Water Quality
Water Supply - economics - methods
Abstract
Forty-two communities in rural Alaska are considered unserved or underserved with water and sewer infrastructure. Many challenges exist to provide centralized piped water and sewer infrastructure to the homes, and they are exacerbated by decreasing capital funding. Unserved communities in rural Alaska experience higher rates of disease, supporting the recommendation that sanitation infrastructure should be provided. Organizations are pursuing alternative solutions to conventional piped water and sewer in order to maximize water use and reuse for public health. This paper reviews initiatives led by the State of Alaska, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, and the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation to identify and develop potential long-term solutions appropriate and acceptable to rural communities. Future developments will likely evolve based on the lessons learned from the initiatives. Recommendations include Alaska-specific research needs, increased end-user participation in the design process, and integrated monitoring, evaluation, and information dissemination in future efforts.
PubMed ID
28353111 View in PubMed
Less detail