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A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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Are special treatment facilities for female alcoholics needed? A controlled 2-year follow-up study from a specialized female unit (EWA) versus a mixed male/female treatment facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12305
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research (EWA Unit), Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1989 Aug;13(4):499-504
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Disulfiram - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Recurrence
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Women with alcohol problems constitute an increasing number of patients in medical service. Do they need special care? How should the treatment program be designed? The specialized female Karolinska Project for Early Treatment of Women with Alcohol Addiction (EWA) unit at the Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, was opened in 1981. The aim of the project is to reach women in an early stage of alcohol dependence behavior and to develop treatment programs specific to the needs of females alone. In order to investigate the value of such a specialized female unit a controlled 2-year follow-up study was carried out including 200 women. The probands were treated in the female only EWA-unit, whereas the controls were placed in the care of traditional mixed-sex alcoholism treatment centers. The 2-year follow-up study showed a more successful rehabilitation regarding alcohol consumption and social adjustment for the women treated in the specialized female unit (EWA). Improvement was noted also for the controls but to a lesser extent. Probably one of the most important achievements of a specialized female unit, such as EWA, is to attract women to come for help earlier.
PubMed ID
2679204 View in PubMed
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[A study of abusers at the EWA unit: women not treated for their alcohol problems have an increased mortality rate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12330
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 May 17;86(20):1898-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-1989