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Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis in adults who are obese or overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135273
Source
Phys Ther. 2011 Jun;91(6):843-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lucie Brosseau
George A Wells
Peter Tugwell
Mary Egan
Claire-Jehanne Dubouloz
Lynn Casimiro
Nicoleta Bugnariu
Vivian A Welch
Gino De Angelis
Lilliane Francoeur
Sarah Milne
Laurianne Loew
Jessica McEwan
Steven P Messier
Eric Doucet
Glen P Kenny
Denis Prud'homme
Sydney Lineker
Mary Bell
Stéphane Poitras
Jing Xian Li
Hillel M Finestone
Lucie Laferrière
Angela Haines-Wangda
Marion Russell-Doreleyers
Kim Lambert
Alison D Marshall
Margot Cartizzone
Adam Teav
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Montfort Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lbrossea@uottawa.ca
Source
Phys Ther. 2011 Jun;91(6):843-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Life Style
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications
Ontario
Osteoarthritis - complications - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Overweight - complications
Physical Therapy Modalities
Abstract
The objective of this review was to construct an updated evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the use of physical activity and diet for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in adults (>18 years of age) who are obese or overweight (body mass index =25 kg/m(2)).
Articles were extracted from the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE (Current Contents), SPORTDiscus, SUM, Scopus, CINAHL, AMED, BIOMED, PubMed, ERIC, the Cochrane Controlled Trials, and PEDro.
The Ottawa Panel and research assistance team strictly applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria from previous Ottawa Panel publications.
An a priori literature search was conducted for articles related to obesity and OA of the lower extremities that were published from January 1, 1966, to November 30, 2010. Inclusion criteria and the methods to grade the recommendations were created by the Ottawa Panel.
were graded based on the strength of evidence (A, B, C, C+, D, D+, or D-) as well as experimental design (I for randomized controlled trials and II for nonrandomized studies). In agreement with previous Ottawa Panel methods, Cochrane Collaboration methods were utilized for statistical analysis. Clinical significance was established by an improvement of =15% in the experimental group compared with the control group. There were a total of 79 recommendations from 9 articles. From these recommendations, there were 36 positive recommendations: 21 grade A and 15 grade C+. There were no grade B recommendations, and all recommendations were of clinical benefit.
Further research is needed, as more than half of the trials were of low methodological quality.
This review suggests that physical activity and diet programs are beneficial, specifically for pain relief (9 grade A recommendations) and improved functional status (6 grade A and 7 grade C+ recommendations), for adults with OA who are obese or overweight. The Ottawa Panel was able to demonstrate that when comparing physical activity alone, diet alone, physical activity combined with diet, and control groups, the intervention including physical activity and diet produced the most beneficial results.
PubMed ID
21493746 View in PubMed
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Patterns of alcohol consumption in 10 European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186257
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1287-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
S. Sieri
A. Agudo
E. Kesse
K. Klipstein-Grobusch
B. San-José
A A Welch
V. Krogh
R. Luben
N. Allen
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
A. Thiébaut
A B Miller
H. Boeing
M. Kolyva
C. Saieva
E. Celentano
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
M. Brustad
M. Kumle
M. Dorronsoro
A. Fernandez Feito
I. Mattisson
L. Weinehall
E. Riboli
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy. sieris@libero.it
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1287-96
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the quantities of alcohol and types of alcoholic beverages consumed, and the timing of consumption, in centres participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). These centres, in 10 European countries, are characterised by widely differing drinking habits and frequencies of alcohol-related diseases.
We collected a single standardised 24-hour dietary recall per subject from a random sample of the EPIC cohort (36 900 persons initially and 35 955 after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age). This provided detailed information on the distribution of alcohol consumption during the day in relation to main meals, and was used to determine weekly consumption patterns. The crude and adjusted (by age, day of week and season) means of total ethanol consumption and consumption according to type of beverage were stratified by centre and sex.
Sex was a strong determinant of drinking patterns in all 10 countries. The highest total alcohol consumption was observed in the Spanish centres (San Sebastian, 41.4 g day-1) for men and in Danish centres (Copenhagen, 20.9 g day-1) for women. The lowest total alcohol intake was in the Swedish centres (Umeå, 10.2 g day-1) in men and in Greek women (3.4 g day-1). Among men, the main contributor to total alcohol intake was wine in Mediterranean countries and beer in the Dutch, German, Swedish and Danish centres. In most centres, the main source of alcohol for women was wine except for Murcia (Spain), where it was beer. Alcohol consumption, particularly by women, increased markedly during the weekend in nearly all centres. The German, Dutch, UK (general population) and Danish centres were characterised by the highest percentages of alcohol consumption outside mealtimes.
The large variation in drinking patterns among the EPIC centres provides an opportunity to better understand the relationship between alcohol and alcohol-related diseases.
PubMed ID
12639233 View in PubMed
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Plasma levels of six carotenoids in nine European countries: report from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9392
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Sep;7(6):713-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Wael K Al-Delaimy
Anne Linda van Kappel
Pietro Ferrari
Nadia Slimani
Jean-Paul Steghens
Sheila Bingham
Ingegerd Johansson
Peter Wallström
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Tim J Key
Ailsa A Welch
H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
Petra H M Peeters
Heiner Boeing
Jakob Linseisen
Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
Catherine Guibout
Carmen Navarro
Jose Ramón Quirós
Domenico Palli
Egidio Celentano
Antonia Trichopoulou
Vassiliki Benetou
Rudolf Kaaks
Elio Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Aldelaimy@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Sep;7(6):713-22
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Carotenoids - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Smoking
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In addition to their possible direct biological effects, plasma carotenoids can be used as biochemical markers of fruit and vegetable consumption for identifying diet-disease associations in epidemiological studies. Few studies have compared levels of these carotenoids between countries in Europe. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess the variability of plasma carotenoid levels within the cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Plasma levels of six carotenoids--alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin--were measured cross-sectionally in 3043 study subjects from 16 regions in nine European countries. We investigated the relative influence of gender, season, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol intake and smoking status on plasma levels of the carotenoids. RESULTS: Mean plasma level of the sum of the six carotenoids varied twofold between regions (1.35 micromol l(-1) for men in Malmö, Sweden vs. 2.79 micromol l(-1) for men in Ragusa/Naples, Italy; 1.61 micromol l(-1) for women in The Netherlands vs. 3.52 micromol l(-1) in Ragusa/Naples, Italy). Mean levels of individual carotenoids varied up to fourfold (alpha-carotene: 0.06 micromol l(-1) for men in Murcia, Spain vs. 0.25 micromol l(-1) for vegetarian men living in the UK). In multivariate regression analyses, region was the most important predictor of total plasma carotenoid level (partial R(2)=27.3%), followed by BMI (partial R(2)=5.2%), gender (partial R(2)=2.7%) and smoking status (partial R(2)=2.8%). Females had higher total carotenoid levels than males across Europe. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma levels of carotenoids vary substantially between 16 different regions in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, Germany, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands. Compared with region of residence, the other demographic and lifestyle factors and laboratory measurements have limited predictive value for plasma carotenoid levels in Europe.
PubMed ID
15369608 View in PubMed
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Prevention and self-management interventions are top priorities for osteoarthritis systematic reviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120507
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2013 May;66(5):503-510.e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Alejandra Jaramillo
Vivian A Welch
Erin Ueffing
Russell L Gruen
Peter Bragge
Anne Lyddiatt
Peter Tugwell
Author Affiliation
Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2013 May;66(5):503-510.e4
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - economics
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis - economics - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Research
Research Design
Review Literature as Topic
Self Care
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To identify high-priority research questions for osteoarthritis systematic reviews with consideration of health equity and the social determinants of health (SDH).
We consulted with experts and conducted a literature search to identify a priority-setting method that could be adapted to address the health equity and SDH. We selected the Global Evidence Mapping priority-setting method, and through consultations and consensus, we adapted the method to meet our objectives. This involves developing an evidence map of the existing systematic reviews on osteoarthritis; conducting one face-to-face workshop with patients and another one with clinicians, researchers, and patients; and conducting an online survey of patients to rank the top 10 research questions. We piloted the adapted method with the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group to set research priorities for osteoarthritis.
Our focus was on systematic reviews: we identified 34 high-priority research questions for osteoarthritis systematic reviews. Prevention and self-management interventions, mainly diet and exercise, are top priorities for osteoarthritis systematic reviews. Evaluation against our predefined objectives showed that this method did prioritize SDH (50% of the research questions considered SDH). There were marked gaps: no high-priority topics were identified for access to care until patients had advanced disease-lifestyle changes once the disease was diagnosed. This method was felt feasible if conducted annually.
We confirmed the utility of an adapted priority-setting method that is feasible and considers SDH. Further testing of this method is needed to assess whether considerations of health equity are prioritized and involve disadvantaged groups of the population.
PubMed ID
22995854 View in PubMed
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Region-specific nutrient intake patterns exhibit a geographical gradient within and between European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96921
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Jul;140(7):1280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Heinz Freisling
Michael T Fahey
Aurelie Moskal
Marga C Ocké
Pietro Ferrari
Mazda Jenab
Teresa Norat
Androniki Naska
Ailsa A Welch
Carmen Navarro
Mandy Schulz
Elisabet Wirfält
Corinne Casagrande
Pilar Amiano
Eva Ardanaz
Christine Parr
Dagrun Engeset
Sara Grioni
Francesco Sera
Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
Yvonne T van der Schouw
Mathilde Touvier
Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
Jytte Halkjaer
Christina C Dahm
Kay-Tee Khaw
Francesca Crowe
Jakob Linseisen
Janine Kröger
Inge Huybrechts
Geneviève Deharveng
Jonas Manjer
Asa Agren
Antonia Trichopoulou
Kostas Tsiotas
Elio Riboli
Sheila Bingham
Nadia Slimani
Author Affiliation
Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon 69372, France.
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Jul;140(7):1280-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Europe
Food Preferences
Geography
Humans
Middle Aged
Abstract
Until recently, the study of nutrient patterns was hampered at an international level by a lack of standardization of both dietary methods and nutrient databases. We aimed to describe the diversity of nutrient patterns in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study at population level as a starting point for future nutrient pattern analyses and their associations with chronic diseases in multi-center studies. In this cross-sectional study, 36,034 persons aged 35-74 y were administered a single, standardized 24-h dietary recall. Intake of 25 nutrients (excluding intake from dietary supplements) was estimated using a standardized nutrient database. We used a graphic presentation of mean nutrient intakes by region and sex relative to the overall EPIC means to contrast patterns within and between 10 European countries. In Mediterranean regions, including Greece, Italy, and the southern centers of Spain, the nutrient pattern was dominated by relatively high intakes of vitamin E and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), whereas intakes of retinol and vitamin D were relatively low. In contrast, in Nordic countries, including Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, reported intake of these same nutrients resulted in almost the opposite pattern. Population groups in Germany, The Netherlands, and the UK shared a fatty acid pattern of relatively high intakes of PUFA and SFA and relatively low intakes of MUFA, in combination with a relatively high intake of sugar. We confirmed large variability in nutrient intakes across the EPIC study populations and identified 3 main region-specific patterns with a geographical gradient within and between European countries.
PubMed ID
20484545 View in PubMed
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Standardization of the 24-hour diet recall calibration method used in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC): general concepts and preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20649
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Dec;54(12):900-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
N. Slimani
P. Ferrari
M. Ocké
A. Welch
H. Boeing
M. Liere
V. Pala
P. Amiano
A. Lagiou
I. Mattisson
C. Stripp
D. Engeset
R. Charrondière
M. Buzzard
W. Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Dec;54(12):900-17
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Calibration
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Models, Statistical
Prejudice
Reference Standards
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Despite increasing interest in the concept of calibration in dietary surveys, there is still little experience in the use and standardization of a common reference dietary method, especially in international studies. In this paper, we present the general theoretical framework and the approaches developed to standardize the computer-assisted 24 h diet recall method (EPIC-SOFT) used to collect about 37 000 24-h dietary recall measurements (24-HDR) from the 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). In addition, an analysis of variance was performed to examine the level of standardization of EPIC-SOFT across the 90 interviewers involved in the study. METHODS: The analysis of variance used a random effects model in which mean energy intake per interviewer was used as the dependent variable, while age, body mass index (BMI), energy requirement, week day, season, special diet, special day, physical activity and the EPIC-SOFT version were used as independent variables. The analysis was performed separately for men and women. RESULTS: The results show no statistical difference between interviewers in all countries for men and five out of eight countries for women, after adjustment for physical activity and the EPIC-SOFT program version used, and the exclusion of one interviewer in Germany (for men), and one in Denmark (for women). These results showed an interviewer effect in certain countries and a significant difference between gender, suggesting an underlying respondent's effect due to the higher under-reporting among women that was consistently observed in EPIC. However, the actual difference between interviewer and country mean energy intakes is about 10%. Furthermore, no statistical differences in mean energy intakes were observed across centres from the same country, except in Italy and Germany for men, and France and Spain for women, where the populations were recruited from areas scattered throughout the countries. CONCLUSION: Despite these encouraging results and the efforts to standardize the 24-HDR interview method, conscious or unconscious behaviour of respondents and/or interviewer bias cannot be prevented entirely. Further evaluation of the reliability of EPIC-SOFT measurements will be conducted through validation against independent biological markers (nitrogen, potassium).
PubMed ID
11114689 View in PubMed
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Variability of fish consumption within the 10 European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18550
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A A Welch
E. Lund
P. Amiano
M. Dorronsoro
M. Brustad
M. Kumle
M. Rodriguez
C. Lasheras
L. Janzon
J. Jansson
R. Luben
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
K. Klipstein-Grobusch
V. Benetou
X. Zavitsanos
R. Tumino
R. Galasso
H B Bueno-De-Mesquita
M C Ocké
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Strangeways Research Laboratory, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Wort's Causeway, UK. ailsa.welch@srl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crustacea
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shellfish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the consumption of total fish (marine foods) and the fish sub-groups - white fish, fatty fish, very fatty fish, fish products and crustacea, in participants from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of dietary intake using a computerised standardised 24-hour recall interview. Crude means, means and standard errors adjusted by age, season and day of the week were calculated, stratified by centre and gender. SETTING: Twenty-seven redefined centres in the 10 European countries participating in the EPIC study. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 subjects (13 031 men and 22 924 women), aged 35-74 years, selected from the main EPIC cohort. RESULTS: A six- to sevenfold variation in total fish consumption exists in women and men, between the lowest consumption in Germany and the highest in Spain. Overall, white fish represented 49% and 45% of the intake of total fish in women and men, respectively, with the greatest consumption in centres in Spain and Greece and the least in the German and Dutch centres. Consumption of fatty fish reflected that of total fish. However, the greatest intake of very fatty fish was in the coastal areas of northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) and in Germany. Consumption of fish products was greater in northern than in southern Europe, with white fish products predominating in centres in France, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands and Norway. Intake of roe and roe products was low. The highest consumption of crustacea was found in the French, Spanish and Italian centres. The number of fish types consumed was greater in southern than in northern Europe. The greatest variability in consumption by day of the week was found in the countries with the lowest fish intake. CONCLUSIONS: Throughout Europe, substantial geographic variation exists in total fish intake, fish sub-groups and the number of types consumed. Day-to-day variability in consumption is also high.
PubMed ID
12639232 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.