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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Abdominal aortic aneurysms--a national multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234928
Source
Eur J Vasc Surg. 1987 Aug;1(4):239-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1987
Author
S. Amundsen
A. Trippestad
A. Viste
O. Søreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Eur J Vasc Surg. 1987 Aug;1(4):239-43
Date
Aug-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Abdominal
Aortic Aneurysm - mortality - pathology - surgery
Aortic Rupture - surgery
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Postoperative Complications
Prospective Studies
Abstract
A prospective, observational, multicentre study has been carried out on 444 consecutive patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms to study the effect of the diffusion of vascular service on treatment results. Two-hundred and seventy-nine patients were admitted for elective surgery (E), 114 patients had a ruptured aneurysm (R), and 51 had impending rupture (IR). Patients with acute symptoms (R + IR) were generally older and had larger aneurysms than the E group. The postoperative mortality was 7.5%, 16.7%, and 63.1% in the E, IR and R group respectively. The study demonstrates that overall treatment results in these high risk patients are inferior to results published from specialised institutions. Consequently, the diffusion of vascular surgical service seems not to have worked to the benefit of our patients although further analysis may modify this conclusion.
PubMed ID
3454754 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis in Bergen, Norway. A study on incidence, etiology and severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9485
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
H. Gislason
A. Horn
D. Hoem
A. Andrén-Sandberg
A K Imsland
O. Søreide
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. hjorturg@landspitali.is
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(1):29-33
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies on the incidence and etiology of acute pancreatitis show large regional differences. This study was performed to establish incidence, etiology and severity of acute pancreatitis in the population of Bergen, Norway. METHODS: A study of all patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to Haukeland University Hospital over a 10-year period was performed. Information was obtained about the number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the Deaconess Hospital in Bergen. RESULTS: A total of 978 admissions of acute pancreatitis were recorded in these two hospitals giving an incidence of 30.6 per 100,000. Haukeland University Hospital had 757 admissions of acute pancreatitis in 487 patients. Pancreatitis was severe in 20% (96/487) of patients, more often in males (25%) than in females (14%). Mortality due to acute pancreatitis was 3% (16/487). Gallstones were found to be an etiological factor in 48.5% and alcohol consumption in 19% of patients. The risk of recurrent pancreatitis was 47% in alcohol induced and 17% in gallstone induced pancreatitis. The last five years of the study period, endoscopic sphincterotomy of patients with gallstone pancreatitis, resulted in drop in relapse rate from 33% to 1.6%. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was found to be 30.6 per 100,000 with 48.5% associated with gallstones and 17% alcohol induced. Incidence of first attack was 20/100,000. Pancreatitis was classified as severe in 20% of cases with a mortality of 3%.
PubMed ID
15116816 View in PubMed
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[A national registry for cholecystectomy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214321
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 10;115(21):2694-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1995
Author
O. Søreide
A. Bergan
A. Viste
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 10;115(21):2694-5
Date
Sep-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Registries
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 10;115(18):2234-57652717
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 10;115(18):2236-97652718
PubMed ID
7570484 View in PubMed
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Bile duct injuries following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276219
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
A. Viste
A. Horn
K. Øvrebø
B. Christensen
J-H Angelsen
D. Hoem
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):233-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bile Ducts - injuries
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reoperation
Stents
Survival Rate - trends
Tertiary Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Bile duct injuries occur rarely but are among the most dreadful complications following cholecystectomies.
Prospective registration of bile duct injuries occurring in the period 1992-2013 at a tertiary referral hospital.
In total, 67 patients (47 women and 20 men) with a median age of 55 (range 14-86) years had a leak or a lesion of the bile ducts during the study period. Total incidence of postoperative bile leaks or bile duct injuries was 0.9% and for bile duct injuries separately, 0.4%. Median delay from injury to repair was 5 days (range 0-68 days). In 12 patients (18%), the injury was discovered intraoperatively. Bile leak was the major symptom in 59%, and 52% had a leak from the cystic duct or from assumed aberrant ducts in the liver bed of the gall bladder. Following the Clavien-Dindo classification, 39% and 45% were classified as IIIa and IIIb, respectively, 10% as IV, and 6% as V. In all, 31 patients had injuries to the common bile duct or hepatic ducts, and in these patients, 71% were treated with a hepaticojejunostomy. Of patients treated with a hepaticojejunostomy, 56% had an uncomplicated event, whereas 14% later on developed a stricture. Out of 36 patients with injuries to the cystic duct/aberrant ducts, 30 could be treated with stents or sphincterotomies and percutaneous drainage.
Half of injuries following cholecystectomies are related to the cystic duct, and most of these can be treated with endoscopic or percutaneous procedures. A considerable number of patients following hepaticojejunostomy will later on develop a stricture.
PubMed ID
25700851 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the stomach--consequences of surgical health care delivery in Norway 1968--1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27013
Source
Community Med. 1982 Nov;4(4):292-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1982

Complications during the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Norway. A prospective multicentre study in seven hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218774
Source
Eur J Surg. 1994 Mar;160(3):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
E. Trondsen
T E Ruud
B H Nilsen
R. Mårvik
H E Myrvold
T. Buanes
A. Viste
P F Jørgensen
T. Jacobsen
A R Rosseland
Author Affiliation
Surgical Department of Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1994 Mar;160(3):145-51
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bile Ducts - injuries - surgery
Cholangiography - statistics & numerical data
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystectomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - adverse effects - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystitis - complications
Common Bile Duct - injuries
Cystic Duct - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Gallstones - epidemiology
Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Laser Therapy - adverse effects
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Reoperation
Sphincterotomy, Endoscopic - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess the morbidity of laparoscopic cholecystectomy since its introduction in Norway in the Autumn of 1990.
Postal collection of prospectively collected data.
Practices of 26 surgeons in 7 district and university hospitals.
527 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
133 patients (25.5%) had endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography before operation, and two had cholangiograms during operation; dissection was by electrocautery in 490 patients and by laser in 37.
Morbidity, number converted to open operation, and number who required reoperation.
There were no deaths and a total of 70 complications (13.3%), 8 of which were after laser dissection. There were 59 local complications (11.2%) and 11 general (2.1%); 12 patients (2.3%) required reoperation for bleeding (n = 5), biliary leak (n = 4), and incisional hernia (n = 3). One had a retained stone in the common duct. 42 were converted to open operation (8.0%), 11 because of complications (bleeding, n = 6; damage to the bile duct, n = 3; and bowel perforation, n = 2). Of the 28 patients with acute cholecystitis 5 (17.9%) had to be converted to open operations and 7 (25.0%) developed complications. 2 of these patients had bile duct injury.
The morbidity during the introductory period of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Norway is higher than that reported elsewhere, indicating that the risk of complications is increased during the learning period.
PubMed ID
8003567 View in PubMed
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Early operation or conservative management of patients with small bowel obstruction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18661
Source
Eur J Surg. 2002;168(8-9):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
B T Fevang
D. Jensen
K. Svanes
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway. bjorg.fevang@kir.uib.no
Source
Eur J Surg. 2002;168(8-9):475-81
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
Humans
Intestinal Obstruction - surgery - therapy
Intestine, Small
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome after initial non-operative treatment in patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO). DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: University hospital, Norway. PATIENTS: One hundred and fifty-four patients with 166 episodes of SBO admitted during the period (1994-1995). Patients younger than 10 years as well as patients with large bowel obstruction, paralytic ileus, incarcerated hernia or SBO caused by cancer were excluded from the study. INTERVENTIONS: Patients with signs of strangulation were operated on early. The rest were given a trial of conservative treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Need of operative treatment. Incidence of bowel strangulation, complications and death. RESULTS: There were 166 cases of SBO. Twenty patients were operated on early among whom bowel was strangulated in 9. Among the 146 patients initially treated conservatively 93 (64%) settled without operation, 9 (6%) had strangulated bowel and 3 (2%) died. Of the 91 patients with partial obstruction but no sign of strangulation, 72 (79%) resolved on conservative treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with partial obstruction with no sign of strangulation should initially be treated conservatively. When complete obstruction is present, it may settle on conservative management, but the use of supplementary diagnostic tools might be desirable to find the patients who will need early operative treatment.
PubMed ID
12549688 View in PubMed
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Effect of cimetidine on development of gastric cancer in rats after gastrojejunostomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21057
Source
Eur J Surg. 1999 Mar;165(3):259-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
G S Hortemo
H. Maartmann-Moe
O. Rökke
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Bergen, Haukeland Sykehus, Norway.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1999 Mar;165(3):259-61
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Animals
Chi-Square Distribution
Cimetidine - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Duodenogastric Reflux - complications - etiology
Gastrostomy
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Jejunostomy
Male
Prospective Studies
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Stomach Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To find out if cimetidine has an immunomodulating effect on gastric carcinogenesis in rats. DESIGN: Experimental prospective study. SETTING: Teaching hospital, Norway. ANIMALS: 132 male PGV/Mol rats given gastrojejunostomies. INTERVENTION: Half the rats were given cimetidine in their drinking water postoperatively for a minimum of 38 weeks. They were killed after 52 weeks observation and the stomach was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: In the cimetidine fed group 19/48 animals developed cancer (49%), versus 12/43 (28%) in the control group (p = 0.24). CONCLUSION: Cimetidine had no immunomodulatory effect on the development of gastric cancer in rats.
PubMed ID
10231661 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of severely and fatally injured patients in western part of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30033
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
K S Hansen
I. Morild
L B Engesaeter
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen and Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. kari.schroder.hansen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(3):198-203
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology
Accidental Falls - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Analysis of the injury mechanism and characteristics of severely and fatally injured patients in the western part of Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We did a prospective registration of all severely injured patients hospitalized during a three-year period. The files of severely injured patients that died at scene or during transport were retrospectively retrieved from the Forensic Department. A total of 558 patients with an Injury Severity Score > 15 were included. RESULTS: Four-hundred-forty-four men (79.6 %) and 114 women (20.4 %) with a median age of 36 and 51.5 years respectively were included. The proportion of female patients older than 80 years were 19.3 % compared to 5.6 % for men. A total of 215 (38.5 %) patients died and 149 (69.3 %) of these patients died on scene or during transport. The incidence of severely injured patients in Hordaland County was 30 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The incidence was lowest among children below 5 years (7/100,000/year) and highest among persons older than 80 years (95/100,000/year). Men had a 3.8 times greater risk of getting seriously injured compared to women. Road traffic accidents were the cause of the injuries in 235 (42.1 %) patients and 35.8 % of these patients died. A total of 215 (38.5 %) patients were injured due to falls and 30.2 % of these patients died. Patients who had sustained falls were significantly older than patents with other injury mechanisms (p
PubMed ID
15544074 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors after high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in esophageal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141024
Source
Dis Esophagus. 2011 Jan;24(1):39-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
M. Hurmuzlu
H J Aarstad
A K H Aarstad
M J Hjermstad
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Førde Central Hospital, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. meysan.hurmuzlu@helse-bergen.no
Source
Dis Esophagus. 2011 Jan;24(1):39-47
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - therapy
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant - adverse effects
Cisplatin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Dose Fractionation
Esophageal Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Esophagectomy
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Head and Neck Neoplasms - psychology
Humans
Laryngectomy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - adverse effects
Norway
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - adverse effects
Sarcoma - therapy
Statistics, nonparametric
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
Curative treatment of esophageal cancer with definitive or preoperative high-dose chemoradiotherapy inflicts a major strain on the patients with potentially severe physical, emotional, and social consequences. The aim of this study was to assess various aspects of quality of life and fatigue in long-term survivors following such a treatment. Patients undergoing a potentially curative treatment between 1996 and 2007, and still alive (n= 41) completed quality of life questionnaires of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and esophageal cancer module (QLQ-OES18). Twenty patients were treated by surgery alone, and 21 patients were scheduled for high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Five of those patients did not undergo planned surgery. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of three courses of chemotherapy, cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) and 5-fluorouracil 5000 mg/m(2) in each course and concomitant radiotherapy of a median dose 66 Gy. Quality of life in esophageal cancer patients receiving high-dose chemoradiotherapy was compared with that for esophageal cancer patients who received only surgery, head and neck cancer patients, laryngectomized patients, and a random sample of the general Norwegian population. Esophageal cancer patients treated by high-dose chemoradiotherapy had significantly worse global quality of life as reflected by almost all functional scales and higher fatigue compared with esophageal cancer patients who received surgery alone, head and neck cancer patients, and the general Norwegian population. There were no significant differences in quality of life between the esophageal cancer patients receiving high-dose chemoradiotherapy and the laryngectomy patients. Further, the esophageal cancer patients receiving high-dose chemoradiotherapy had higher intensity of other symptoms like general pain, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation compared with the esophageal cancer patients who received surgery alone, head and neck cancer patients, and the general Norwegian population. High-dose chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil had a considerable negative long-term effect on global quality of life in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Fatigue was a prominent long-lasting symptom in these patients.
PubMed ID
20819100 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.