Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Acute myocardial infarction mortality related to use of calcium antagonists before admission to hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48085
Source
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 1998 May;12(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
K. Landmark
A. Reikvam
M. Abdelnoor
E. Sivertssen
I. Aursnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 1998 May;12(2):183-7
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects
Drug Interactions
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Abstract
We investigated whether prior use of calcium antagonists in 80 (16.8%) out of 477 patients (64% males) admitted with acute myocardial infarction (MI) had any impact on in-hospital mortality. Patients using calcium antagonists were slightly older (74 years vs. 72 years, 2P = 0.039) than those not taking them and fewer were male patients. Previous MI, diabetes mellitus, and prior use of aspirin, beta-blockers, and long-acting nitrates were more frequent in patients on calcium antagonists. In contrast, fewer patients on calcium antagonists prior to symptoms received thrombolytic treatment (21.3% vs. 34.8%, 2P = 0.018). The study had an observational exposed/nonexposed design, and we looked for both crude and adjusted effects. Of the 83 patients (17.4%) who died during hospitalization, 18 patients were in the calcium antagonist group (22.5%). The odds ratio (OR) for these patients to die in the hospital was 1.48 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.78; 2P = 0.19. When adjusting for confounders (gender, age, smoking habit, previous MI, and diabetes mellitus, as well as prior use of aspirin, beta-blockers, long-acting nitrates, and thrombolytic treatment at entry) OR was 1.08 and 95% CI 0.57-2.05; 2P = 0.85. Thus, we found no excess in-hospital mortality in patients with acute MI using calcium antagonists prior to the onset of symptoms.
PubMed ID
9652877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beliefs about medications: measurement and relationship to adherence in patients with severe mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154404
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Jan;119(1):78-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
H. Jónsdóttir
S. Friis
R. Horne
K I Pettersen
A. Reikvam
O A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Ulleval University Hospital & Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. halldora.jonsdottir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Jan;119(1):78-84
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Female
Humans
Lithium Carbonate - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Norway
Patient Compliance - psychology
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
To determine if the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) has satisfactory psychometric properties in patients with severe mental disorders and if their scores differ from those of patients with severe medical disorders. To investigate if the scores are related to medication adherence.
Two hundred and eighty psychiatric patients completed the BMQ and reported how much of their medication they had taken the past week. Serum concentrations of medications were analyzed. BMQ scores were compared with those of patients with chronic medical disorders.
Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory for all subscales. The psychiatric group scored lower on the necessity of taking medication than the medical group. Non-adherent patients felt medication to be less necessary and were more concerned about it than adherent patients. The necessity subscale predicted adherence fairly well.
The BMQ has satisfactory psychometric properties for use in patients with severe mental disorders. The constructs measured by the BMQ are related to adherence in these patients.
PubMed ID
18983630 View in PubMed
Less detail

[From clinical trials to routine treatment. General aspects of clinical trials in cardiovascular diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218840
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):455-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1994
Author
A. Reikvam
Author Affiliation
Forskningsforum (FUS) Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):455-8
Date
Feb-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Clinical Trials as Topic
Drug Industry
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Abstract
The first of two articles deals with general aspects of clinical cardiological research: hard end points -mortality and morbidity-in relation to intermediate end points, power of clinical studies, multicentre studies, meta-analyses, and the relationship between the trial population and the total patient population. The article takes up the kind of problems that are addressed in clinical research, and the relationship between the medical profession and the pharmaceutical industry. The author discusses the situation as regards clinical research in Norway, and emphasizes the need for greater efforts in this field.
PubMed ID
8009484 View in PubMed
Less detail

[From clinical trials to routine treatment. What factors are decisive for implementation of research results into clinical practice routines?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218839
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):459-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1994
Author
A. Reikvam
Author Affiliation
Forskningsforum (FUS) Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):459-61
Date
Feb-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - economics
Clinical Trials as Topic
Drug Costs
Drug Industry
Drug Information Services
Humans
Norway
Physician's Role
Abstract
In the second of two articles the author discusses non-scientific factors that influence the application of results from clinical research in clinical practice. This step is essentially a matter of judgement. The factors considered include selective use of research results, protection of special interests, the impact of the "last case", the therapeutical imperative and consensus conferences. Attention is drawn to the importance of market leaders and the relationship between scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. The absence of price incentives is underlined. It is pointed out that clinical research is a vital element in the long-term efforts to secure high quality service to patients.
PubMed ID
8009485 View in PubMed
Less detail

Has hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction been markedly reduced since the introduction of thrombolytics and aspirin? European Secondary Prevention Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54396
Source
J Intern Med. 1998 Apr;243(4):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
A. Reikvam
M. Abdelnoor
E. Sivertssen
Author Affiliation
Research Forum, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Intern Med. 1998 Apr;243(4):259-63
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Streptokinase - therapeutic use
Thrombolytic Therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: There are conflicting views on how hospital mortality with respect to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has changed since the introduction of thrombolytics and aspirin. Our purpose therefore was to explain this by studying hospital mortality in a nonselected AMI population. and then assess how patients allocated to different treatment groups contribute to overall mortality. DESIGN: Extensive data were collected on all AMI patients admitted to the 10 hospitals in health region 1 (population 850,000) in Norway during a 2 month period. A protocol approved by the European Secondary Prevention Study Group was used. RESULTS: Of the 487 patients, 32% received thrombolytics, 72% aspirin and 22%) none of the treatments. Average in-hospital mortality was 18%. Mortality within the different groups was as follows: no thrombolytics nor aspirin group 35.0% (39/111), aspirin group 13.7%, (30/218), thrombolytics group 17.3% (4/23), and thrombolytics plus aspirin group 11.0% (15/135). The characteristics of the nontreated group compared to the aspirin and aspirin plus thrombolytics groups were more females, older, increased frequency of previous AMI, left ventricular failure, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, history of stroke and peptic ulcer, and electrocardiogram (ECG) findings other than ST elevation. CONCLUSION: In a nonselected AMI population, a patient group receiving neither thrombolytics nor aspirin contributed most significantly to an overall high mortality. This indicates a modest reduction in total AMI mortality after the new therapies were introduced, as the mortality for this group, with a high risk profile, has presumably remained unchanged.
PubMed ID
9627139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction has been modestly reduced after introduction of thrombolytics and aspirin: results from a new analytical approach. European Secondary Prevention Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54228
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jul;52(7):609-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Reikvam
I. Aursnes
Author Affiliation
Research Forum, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jul;52(7):609-13
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Norway
Thrombolytic Therapy
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate how the introduction of thrombolytics and aspirin has affected hospital mortality (case fatality) among patients with acute myocardial infarction. The study design was the application of the therapeutic effects found in the clinical trials in a nonselected myocardial infarction population characterized in detail. The study took place in health region 1 in Norway, population 850,000, and subjects were all patients hospitalized and discharged, alive or dead, with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in the 10 hospitals in the region over a period of 2 months. The main outcome measures were deaths in hospital and estimation of expected hospital mortality without thrombolytics or aspirin, weighing and evaluating the effects of delay of different lengths from onset of symptoms to admission, different ages, and different electrocardiogram changes. We found that 32% of the patients received thrombolytics, and 72% received aspirin. Hospital mortality was 18.1% compared with 20.6% had neither of the treatments been administered, implying that the two regimens had reduced mortality by 12%, aspirin contributing about four fifths and thrombolytics one fifth. We conclude that hospital mortality in a nonselected myocardial infarction population has been reduced to moderate extent since the introduction of thrombolytics and aspirin. The effects observed in clinical trials are not translated into epidemiologically documented reduction in mortality, as the optimal conditions are found only in a proportion of the patient groups constituting a nonselected myocardial infarction population.
PubMed ID
10391653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of drug interactions in hospitals--computerized screening vs. bedside recording.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158502
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2008 Apr;33(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
H S Blix
K K Viktil
T A Moger
A. Reikvam
Author Affiliation
Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital and Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. hegesbl@ulrik.uio.no
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2008 Apr;33(2):131-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Databases, Factual
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Therapy Management - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway
Abstract
Managing drug interactions in hospitalized patients is important and challenging. The objective of the study was to compare two methods for identification of drug interactions (DDIs)--computerized screening and prospective bedside recording--with regard to capability of identifying DDIs.
Patient characteristics were recorded for patients admitted to five hospitals. By bedside evaluation drug-related problems, including DDIs, were prospectively recorded by pharmacists and discussed in multidisciplinary teams. A computer screening programme was used to identify DDIs retrospectively--dividing DDIs into four classes: A, avoid; B, avoid/take precautions; C, take precautions; D, no action needed.
Among 827 patients, computer screening identified DDIs in 544 patients (66%); 351 had DDIs introduced in hospital. The 1513 computer-identified DDIs had the following distribution: type A 78; type B 915; type C 38; type D 482. By bedside evaluation, 99 DDIs were identified in 73 patients (9%). The proportions of computer recorded DDIs which were also identified at the bedside were: 5%, 8%, 8%, 2% DDIs of types A, B, C and D respectively. In 10 patients, DDIs not registered by computer screening were identified by bedside evaluation. The drugs most frequently involved in DDIs, identified by computerized screening were acetylsalicylic acid, warfarin, furosemide and digitoxin compared with warfarin, simvastatin, theophylline and carbamazepine, by bedside evaluation.
Despite an active prospective bedside search for DDIs, this approach identified less than one in 10 of the DDIs recorded by computer screening, including those regarded as hazardous. However, computer screening overestimates considerably when the objective is to identify clinically relevant DDIs.
PubMed ID
18315778 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Increasing use of antilipemic agents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54219
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jun 20;119(16):2314-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1999

[Patient characteristics and mortality in acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46454
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 30;116(14):1668-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1996
Author
A. Reikvam
Author Affiliation
Forskningsforum Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 30;116(14):1668-70
Date
May-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Data on all patients with myocardial infarctions treated in the ten hospitals in Health region 1 in Norway were extensively analysed. Of the 487 patients with the diagnosis acute myocardial infarction, 429 (88%) had definite or suspected acute myocardial infarction; 440 (90%) were treated in an intensive care unit. Average age was 70 years, for men 68 years and for women 75 years, and 69% of the patients suffered their first acute myocardial infarction. Within six hours 59% of the patients were admitted to hospital and within 12 hours 76%. On admission, 58% of the patients had an electrocardiogram showing ST elevation or bundle branch block. The remainder showed other findings, of which ST depression was the most frequent (23%). In-hospital mortality was 18% and of those discharged 10% died within six months. It is concluded that the true acute myocardial infarction population differs from the population of patients in clinical trials as follows: higher age, longer delay before admission to hospital, a different distribution of EGG findings, and higher mortality.
PubMed ID
8658432 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thrombolytic eligibility in acute myocardial infarction patients admitted to Norwegian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46388
Source
Int J Cardiol. 1997 Aug 29;61(1):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-1997
Author
A. Reikvam
D. Ketley
Author Affiliation
Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 1997 Aug 29;61(1):79-83
Date
Aug-29-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Clinical Trials
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Norway
Patient Selection
Retrospective Studies
Streptokinase - therapeutic use
Thrombolytic Therapy
Abstract
We characterised the population of acute myocardial infarction patients admitted to Norwegian hospitals and quantified the actual use and potential maximal use of thrombolytic therapy. Data were collected by medical record review of all acute myocardial infarction patients discharged from hospital in April and May 1993 in Health region 1. The clinical population differed significantly from the patients recruited to the thrombolytic clinical trials. Patients were more likely to have ST depression on admission (23% vs. 7%) and to be over 74 years (42% vs. 10%) than in the trials. A fifth of patients presented more than 12 h after symptom onset (or time indeterminate). Thrombolysis was given to 32% of patients, mainly utilising streptokinase. Late presentation or diagnostic difficulty appeared to be the main reasons for non- thrombolysis. Approximately 50% of the clinical population were eligible for thrombolysis. Eligibility for thrombolytic therapy was therefore severely restricted by the presenting characteristics of the clinical population. Substantial numbers of patients belonged to subgroups where the reported benefit from thrombolysis is equivocal. Uncertainty remains on the extrapolation of the trials evidence to those subgroups who were under-represented in the clinical trials.
PubMed ID
9292336 View in PubMed
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.