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Antipyrine, coumarin and glipizide affect n-acetylation measured by caffeine test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48413
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1995;49(5):225-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
I. Klebovich
A. Rautio
P. Salonpää
P. Arvela
O. Pelkonen
E A Sotaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1995;49(5):225-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylation - drug effects
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Antipyrine - pharmacology
Caffeine - diagnostic use
Coumarins - pharmacology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - urine
Female
Glipizide - pharmacology
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Uracil - analogs & derivatives - urine
Xanthines - urine
Abstract
The effect of various treatments on acetylation status measured by caffeine metabolites was investigated in 17 subjects with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The test drugs, caffeine (200 mg), antipyrine (20 mg/kg) and coumarin (5 mg), were given simultaneously, and urinary 5-acetylamino-6-formyl-amino-3-methyluracil/1-methylxanthine (AFMU/1X) molar ratio was measured before and after 8 weeks of therapy. The urinary AFMU/1X molar ratio decreased (p
PubMed ID
7579000 View in PubMed
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CYP2A6: a human coumarin 7-hydroxylase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10471
Source
Toxicology. 2000 Apr 3;144(1-3):139-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2000
Author
O. Pelkonen
A. Rautio
H. Raunio
M. Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, FIN-90401, Oulu, Finland. olavi.pelkonen@oulu.fi
Source
Toxicology. 2000 Apr 3;144(1-3):139-47
Date
Apr-3-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - metabolism
Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases
Coumarins - metabolism
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - antagonists & inhibitors - biosynthesis - metabolism
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Mixed Function Oxygenases - antagonists & inhibitors - biosynthesis - metabolism
Abstract
Coumarin 7-hydroxylation is catalysed by a high-affinity CYP2A6 enzyme in human liver microsomes. CYP2A6 is the only enzyme catalysing this reaction and consequently the formation of 7-hydroxycoumarin can be used as 'an in vitro and in vivo probe' for CYP2A6. CYP2A6 is a major contributor to the oxidative metabolism of nicotine and cotinine, and it also contributes, to a larger or smaller extent, to the metabolism of a few pharmaceuticals (e.g. fadrozole), nitrosamines, other carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and a number of coumarin-type alkaloids. CYP2A6 may be inducible by antiepileptic drugs and it is decreased in alcohol-induced severe liver cirrhosis. Several mutated or deleted CYP2A6 alleles have been characterized. Although CYP2A6 represent up to 15% of human microsomes P450 proteins, it is still one of the less well characterised cytochrome P450 enzymes.
PubMed ID
10781881 View in PubMed
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The CYP2A subfamily: function, expression and genetic polymorphism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20807
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1999;(148):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
H. Raunio
A. Rautio
O. Pelkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1999;(148):197-207
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biotransformation - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic - genetics
Genetics, Population
Genotype
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Mice
Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Steroid Hydroxylases - genetics - physiology
Abstract
The CYP2A6 gene is one of the three members of the human CYP2A gene subfamily, the others being CYP2A7 and CYP2A13. The CYP2A6 enzyme catalyses the oxidation of several compounds that have clinical or toxicological interest, including pharmaceuticals, procarcinogens, and tobacco smoke constituents. CYP2A6 is expressed mainly in liver, and only trace amounts are found in extrahepatic tissues. Coumarin is a high-affinity substrate for CYP2A6, and a phenotyping test based on coumarin 7-hydroxylation has been developed. Two mutant alleles of the CYP2A6 gene have been found, i.e. CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*3. Homozygosity for both mutated alleles appears to confer a poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype, detectable by slow or non-existent 7-hydroxylation of coumarin. Very little is known about the inducibility and regulation of CYP2A6, but studies on the mouse orthologue, CYP2A5, have revealed novel pathways for induction. Since CYP2A6 polymorphism was found fairly recently, nothing is known presently about associations between variant CYP2A6 alleles and diseases or other adverse outcomes of exposure to toxins. Such studies, however, are clearly warranted, given the wide range of procarcinogens and other toxins metabolized by the CYP2A6 enzyme.
PubMed ID
10493259 View in PubMed
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Effect of insulin on serum amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48580
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1992 Sep;17(3):209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
E A Sotaniemi
F G Stenbäck
L. Risteli
J A Vuori
A. Rautio
R. Huupponen
J. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1992 Sep;17(3):209-15
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Female
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood - metabolism
Procollagen - blood - metabolism
Abstract
The effect of insulin on the serum levels of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) was investigated in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, whose disease was unsatisfactorily controlled by oral drugs. Before insulin therapy the PIIINP values of the patients (3.2 +/- 1.3 micrograms/l, n = 38) varied within the range of healthy subjects (3.1 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, n = 50, NS). Insulin therapy (6-20 IU at bedtime plus the oral drugs) improved the glycemic control and increased the serum PIIINP during a 4 week (3.1 +/- 0.9 to 3.8 +/- 1.1 micrograms/l, P less than 0.01, n = 8) and an 8 week period (3.2 +/- 1.3 to 3.8 +/- 1.6 micrograms/l, P less than 0.001, n = 22). The values were still elevated after 6 months on insulin (3.5 +/- 1.5 to 4.0 +/- 1.7 micrograms/l, P less than 0.01, n = 12). Placebo-insulin did not alter the concentration of PIIINP (3.1 +/- 0.6 to 2.8 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, NS, n = 8) whereas the glycemic control improved and body weight decreased. The PIIINP values correlated with fasting insulin before (r = 0.403, P less than 0.05, n = 30) and after the therapy (r = 0.452, P less than 0.001, n = 60). Insulin therapy, while correcting the hormone deficiency and restoring glucose and protein metabolism, seems to activate the synthesis of type III procollagen in patients with NIDDM. This may promote the atherosclerotic process.
PubMed ID
1425160 View in PubMed
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Environmental health - from exposure to biomarkers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286393
Source
Page 342 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
ENVIRONMENTAL HEAL TH- FROM EXPOSURE TO BIOMARKERS A. Rautio 1 , P. Myllynen 2 , K. V.3h.3kangas 2 ' 3 1Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, 2 Department of Biosciences (Pharmacology and Toxicology), University of Oulu, 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
  1 document  
Author
A. Rautio
P. Myllynen
K. Vahakangas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu
Department of Biosciences (Pharmacology and Toxicology), University of Oulu
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland
Source
Page 342 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Ethical aspects in the environmental health research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286398
Source
Page 344 and page 386 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
ETHICAL ASPECTS IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL HEAL TH RESEARCH K. V.3h.3kangas 1 , A. Rautio 2 , A.M. Pietil.33 Departments of 1 Pharmacology and Toxicology and 3 Nursing Science, University of Kuopio; and 2 Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland At the moment in
  1 document  
Author
K. Vahakangas
A. Rautio
A.M. Pietila
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pharmacology and Toxicology, and Nursing Science, University of Kuopio
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland
Source
Page 344 and page 386 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 9. Indigenous Health and Wellbeing.
Documents
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Favourable trends in the incidence and outcome of myocardial infarction in nondiabetic, but not in diabetic, subjects: findings from the MONICA myocardial infarction registry in northern Sweden in 1989-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46984
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Oct;258(4):369-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Rautio
V. Lundberg
T. Messner
S. Nasic
B. Stegmayr
M. Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå, Sweden. aslak.rautio@telia.com
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Oct;258(4):369-77
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare time trends in incidence, case fatality and mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with or without diabetes. METHODS: This study was based on the Northern Sweden MONICA Project MI registry with a target population of about 200,000 inhabitants in the age group 35--64 years in the two northernmost counties of Sweden. During 1989--2000, 6254 patients who had had an MI according to MONICA criteria were included in this study: 4569 patients had a first MI and 1685 had a recurrent MI. Sixteen per cent of the men and 20% of the women had had diabetes mellitus diagnosed prior the MI. RESULTS: Over the 12-year period, there was a declining trend in incidence and case fatality in first MI. Also, the event rates (first ever and recurrent MI) declined in men without diabetes. In women without diabetes favourable time trends were seen in first ever MI, recurrent MI and in case fatality. There were no favourable time trends for any of these outcomes in patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: In nondiabetic subjects below the age of 65, the incidence of, and case-fatality in, MI declined. This led to a decreased mortality over the 12-year period. These favourable trends over time were not observed in diabetic subjects.
PubMed ID
16164577 View in PubMed
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Future directions for monitoring and human health research for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292549
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1480084
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
B Adlard
S G Donaldson
J O Odland
P Weihe
J Berner
A Carlsen
E C Bonefeld-Jorgensen
A A Dudarev
J C Gibson
E M Krümmel
K Olafsdottir
K Abass
A Rautio
I A Bergdahl
G Mulvad
Author Affiliation
a Health Canada , Ottawa , Canada.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1480084
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
For the last two and a half decades, a network of human health experts under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) has produced several human health assessment reports. These reports have provided a base of scientific knowledge regarding environmental contaminants and their impact on human health in the Arctic. These reports provide scientific information and policy-relevant recommendations to Arctic governments. They also support international agreements such as the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and the Minamata Convention on Mercury. Key topics discussed in this paper regarding future human health research in the circumpolar Arctic are continued contaminant biomonitoring, health effects research and risk communication. The objective of this paper is to describe knowledge gaps and future priorities for these fields.
Notes
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2012 Feb;215(2):159-67 PMID 22115955
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33803 PMID 27974135
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33805 PMID 27974137
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33822 PMID 27974140
PubMed ID
29943674 View in PubMed
Less detail

Future directions for monitoring and human health research for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295680
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1480084
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
B Adlard
S G Donaldson
J O Odland
P Weihe
J Berner
A Carlsen
E C Bonefeld-Jorgensen
A A Dudarev
J C Gibson
E M Krümmel
K Olafsdottir
K Abass
A Rautio
I A Bergdahl
G Mulvad
Author Affiliation
a Health Canada , Ottawa , Canada.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1480084
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollution
Health Impact Assessment
Humans
Public Health
Research
Research Report
Abstract
For the last two and a half decades, a network of human health experts under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) has produced several human health assessment reports. These reports have provided a base of scientific knowledge regarding environmental contaminants and their impact on human health in the Arctic. These reports provide scientific information and policy-relevant recommendations to Arctic governments. They also support international agreements such as the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and the Minamata Convention on Mercury. Key topics discussed in this paper regarding future human health research in the circumpolar Arctic are continued contaminant biomonitoring, health effects research and risk communication. The objective of this paper is to describe knowledge gaps and future priorities for these fields.
Notes
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2012 Feb;215(2):159-67 PMID 22115955
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33803 PMID 27974135
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33805 PMID 27974137
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33822 PMID 27974140
PubMed ID
29943674 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.