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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and risk of myocardial infarction in middle-aged Danes: the diet, cancer and health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290731
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
V B Gunge
I Andersen
C Kyrø
C P Hansen
C C Dahm
J Christensen
A Tjønneland
A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 05; 71(5):652-658
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Healthy Diet
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
For decades, the Mediterranean diet has been in focus regarding healthy eating as it has been associated with reduced risk of non-communicable diseases. Less interest has been given to health benefits of other regional diets. The aim of the present study was to assess whether adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was associated with lower risk of myocardial infarction (MI) among middle-aged Danes.
Data were obtained from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study of 57?053 men and women aged 50-64 years recruited between 1993 and 1997. The healthy Nordic food index comprised healthy Nordic food items selected a priori (fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apple and pears and root vegetables). Information on incident MI was ascertained through linkage with national registries. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models.
In total, 1669 men and 653 women developed MI during follow-up (13.6 median years). In adjusted models, those with an index score of 5-6 points (highest scores) had significantly lower MI risk (men: HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.62, 0.97; women: HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.37, 0.82) relative to those scoring 0 points in the index (lowest score). A significantly lower MI risk was found per 1-point increment in the index in both men (HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.92, 0.99) and women (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.88, 0.98).
A healthy Nordic diet is associated with lower MI risk among middle-aged Danes, suggesting that Nordic diets should be considered in recommendations for dietary changes in the promotion of coronary health.
PubMed ID
28247857 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and levamisole) in Dukes' B and C colorectal carcinoma. A cost-effectiveness analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22339
Source
Ann Oncol. 1997 Jan;8(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
J. Norum
B. Vonen
J A Olsen
A. Revhaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Ann Oncol. 1997 Jan;8(1):65-70
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics - therapeutic use
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant - economics
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics - mortality - pathology - surgery
Colostomy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - economics
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Levamisole - administration & dosage - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Travel - economics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, levamisole) is now standard practice in the treatment of Dukes' B and C coloretal carcinoma (CRC), and this has increased the financial burden on health care systems world-wide. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1993 and 1996, 95 patients in northern Norway were included in a national randomised CRC study, and assigned to surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone. In April 1996, 94 of the patients were evaluable and 82 were still alive. The total treatment costs (hospital stay, surgery, chemotherapy, administrative and travelling costs) were calculated. A questionnaire was mailed to all survivors for assessment of the quality of their lives (QoL) (EuroQol questionnaire, a simple QoL-scale, global QoL-measure of the EORTC QLQ-C30), and 62 of them (76%) responded. RESULTS: Adjuvant chemotherapy in Dukes' B and C CRC raised the total treatment costs by 3,369 pounds. The median QoL was 0.83 (0-1 scale) in both arms. Employing a 5% discount rate and an improved survival of adjuvant therapy ranging from 5% to 15%, we calculated the cost of one gained quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) to be between 4,800 pounds and 16,800 pounds. CONCLUSION: Using a cut-off point level of 20,000 pounds per QALY, adjuvant chemotherapy in CRC appears to be cost-effective only when the improvement in 5-year survival is > or = 5%. Adjuvant chemotherapy does not affect short-term QoL.
PubMed ID
9093709 View in PubMed
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Agency in health care with an endogenous budget constraint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217989
Source
J Health Econ. 1994 Jul;13(2):231-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
D. Clark
J A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Health Econ. 1994 Jul;13(2):231-51
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Consumer Satisfaction - economics
Ethics, Medical
Health Maintenance Organizations - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Models, Econometric
Norway
Patient Participation - economics
Physician's Role
Abstract
In this paper a doctor acts as a perfect agent for a group of patients in an environment where the health service is funded by a group of contributors. The contributor group donates resources to the health sector in accordance with its split preferences about the health care services which they would like for themselves and those which they would like for others. We show that the size of the health budget is endogenous and depends on the choices made by the doctor. The focus is on the division of the budget between health enhancing and non-health enhancing health care.
PubMed ID
10138027 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the sexual norms among the unmarried in Greenland]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4698
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1971 Dec 10;133(49):2443-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1971

But health can still be a necessity ....

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220887
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Jul;12(2):187-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
J A Olsen
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Department of Economics, Norway.
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Jul;12(2):187-91
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Models, Econometric
Norway
Quality of Health Care - economics
Social Values
PubMed ID
10127776 View in PubMed
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[Changes in the smoking habits of Danes in the period 1970-1987]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67976
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Sep 19;150(38):2229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-1988

Cigar and pipe smoking and cancer risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98017
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Va McCormack
A. Agudo
Cc Dahm
K. Overvad
A. Olsen
A. Tjonneland
R. Kaaks
H. Boeing
J. Manjer
M. Almquist
G. Hallmans
I. Johansson
Md Chirlaque
A. Barricarte
M. Dorronsoro
L. Rodriguez
Ml Redondo
Kt Khaw
N. Wareham
N. Allen
T. Key
E. Riboli
P. Boffetta
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The carcinogenicity of cigar and pipe smoking is established but the effect of detailed smoking characteristics is less well defined. We examined the effects on cancer incidence of exclusive cigar and pipe smoking, and in combination with cigarettes, among 102395 men from Denmark, Germany, Spain, Sweden and UK in the EPIC cohort. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for cancer during a median 9 year follow-up from ages 35-70 years were estimated using proportional hazards models. Compared to never smokers, HR of cancers of lung, upper aero-digestive tract and bladder combined was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.8) for exclusive cigar smokers (16 cases), 3.0 (2.1, 4.5) for exclusive pipe smokers (33 cases) and 5.3 (4.4, 6.4) for exclusive cigarette smokers (1069 cases). For each smoking type, effects were stronger in current than in ex-smokers, and in inhalers than in non-inhalers. Ever smokers of both cigarettes and cigars (HR 5.7 (4.4, 7.3), 120 cases) and cigarettes and pipes (5.1 (4.1, 6.4), 247 cases) had as high a raised risk as had exclusive cigarette smokers. In these smokers, the magnitude of the raised risk was smaller if they had switched to cigars or pipes only (i.e. quit cigarettes) and had not compensated with greater smoking intensity. Cigar and pipe smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking. The lower cancer risk of cigar and pipe smokers as compared to cigarette smokers is explained by lesser degree of inhalation and lower smoking intensity. (c) 2010 UICC.
PubMed ID
20162568 View in PubMed
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Clarifying Associations between Childhood Adversity, Social Support, Behavioral Factors, and Mental Health, Health, and Well-Being in Adulthood: A Population-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273289
Source
Front Psychol. 2016;7:727
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mashhood A Sheikh
Birgit Abelsen
Jan A Olsen
Source
Front Psychol. 2016;7:727
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that socio-demographic factors, childhood socioeconomic status (CSES), childhood traumatic experiences (CTEs), social support and behavioral factors are associated with health and well-being in adulthood. However, the relative importance of these factors for mental health, health, and well-being has not been studied. Moreover, the mechanisms by which CTEs affect mental health, health, and well-being in adulthood are not clear. Using data from a representative sample (n = 12,981) of the adult population in Tromsø, Norway, this study examines (i) the relative contribution of structural conditions (gender, age, CSES, psychological abuse, physical abuse, and substance abuse distress) to social support and behavioral factors in adulthood; (ii) the relative contribution of socio-demographic factors, CSES, CTEs, social support, and behavioral factors to three multi-item instruments of mental health (SCL-10), health (EQ-5D), and subjective well-being (SWLS) in adulthood; (iii) the impact of CTEs on mental health, health, and well-being in adulthood, and; (iv) the mediating role of adult social support and behavioral factors in these associations. Instrumental support (24.16%, p
PubMed ID
27252668 View in PubMed
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Consumption of antibiotics in Greenland, 1964-70. 3. Effect of coincidental administration of antibiotics on gonorrhoeal infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254912
Source
Br J Vener Dis. 1973 Feb;49(1):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1973
Author
G A Olsen
Source
Br J Vener Dis. 1973 Feb;49(1):30-2
Date
Feb-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - history
Gonorrhea - drug therapy
Greenland
History, 20th Century
Humans
Penicillins - blood - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Notes
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1965 Sep;41(3):193-85173875
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1966 Jun;42(2):103-64287796
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 1965;45(3):242-534163244
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1967 Apr 1;97(7):968-734225503
Cites: JAMA. 1967 Nov 6;202(6):461-734963707
Cites: Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1969 Sep-Oct;10(5):690-7014980112
Cites: Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 1970 Aug;12(8):536-444988843
Cites: Chemotherapy. 1970;15(6):384-915514977
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 1971;51(6):467-754109430
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1961 Sep 22;123:1329-3114479376
Cites: Am J Med Sci. 1961 Dec;242:663-7214495760
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 1963;43:235-914033876
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1965 Jun;41:117-914332074
PubMed ID
4571574 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.