Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimation of age- and gender-specific food availability from household budget survey data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52284
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1149-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
V G Vasdeki
S. Stylianou
A. Naska
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece. vasdekis@aueb.gr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1149-51
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Belgium
Budgets
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Diet Surveys
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Great Britain
Greece
Housekeeping - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Economic
Norway
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To derive estimates of age-gender specific food availability, based on data collected at household level. DESIGN: Two alternative modelling approaches are described leading to linear and non-linear optimisation, respectively. The idea of penalised least squares is used for estimation of model parameters. The effect of household characteristics can be incorporated into both modelling approaches. SETTING: Household budget survey data from four European countries (Belgium, Greece, Norway and the United Kingdom), circa 1990.
PubMed ID
11924939 View in PubMed
Less detail

Methodology for rendering household budget and individual nutrition surveys comparable, at the level of the dietary information collected.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19209
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1153-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
A. Naska
S. Paterakis
H. Eeckman
A M Remaut
K. Trygg
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Athens, Greece. anaska@nut.uoa.gr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1153-8
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium
Budgets
Comparative Study
Cookery - methods
Databases, Factual
Diet Surveys
Food Habits
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Great Britain
Greece
Housekeeping - economics - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the methodology applied in order to render comparable, at the level of the dietary information collected, the household budget survey (HBS) and individual nutrition survey (INS) data from four European countries (Belgium, Greece, Norway and the United Kingdom). SETTING: In Belgium, data from the HBS of 1987-88 were compared with data from the Belgian Interuniversity Research on Nutrition and Health collected from 1980 to 1985. In Greece, data from the HBS undertaken in 1993-94 in the greater Athens area were compared with data collected around 1994 in the same region, in the context of the Greek segment of the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition study. In Norway, data from the HBS carried out in 1992, 1993 and 1994 were compared with the NORKOST study conducted in 1993-94. In the United Kingdom, data from four HBSs carried out in 1985, 1986, 1987 and 1988 were compared with the National Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British adults conducted in 1987-88. DESIGN: INS-generated data were converted into 'HBS-like' estimates with the application of yield factors for weight changes during cooking, recipe-based calculations and edible proportion coefficients taking into account weight changes during the food preparation. The 'HBS-like' estimates thus obtained were compared with the original HBS values, after applying an adjustment factor for food spoiled or given to pets. CONCLUSION: The methodological considerations overviewed in the present paper indicate that a number of issues need to be taken into account before a proper comparison of the dietary data collected through surveys implemented with varied methodologies is carried out.
PubMed ID
11924940 View in PubMed
Less detail

A preliminary assessment of the use of household budget survey data for the prediction of individual food consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52283
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
A. Naska
V G Vasdekis
A. Trichopoulou
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Athens, Greece.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1159-65
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium
Budgets
Cookery - methods
Diet Surveys
Female
Food - classification - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Great Britain
Greece
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare individualised household budget survey (HBS) data with food consumption values derived from individual nutrition surveys (INSs). SETTING: Four European countries: Belgium, 1980-85 and 1987-88; Greece, 1993-94; Norway, 1992-94; and the United Kingdom, 1985-88. DESIGN: Household budget survey data were individualised with non-parametric models. Individual nutrition survey data were converted into 'HBS-like' estimates, with the application of recipe-based calculations and yield factors for weight changes during food preparation. To correct for over- and underreporting or recording in both surveys, quantities (in g day(-1)) of 14 principal food groups were expressed as fractions of total food quantity (in g day(-1)). For each food group, INS and HBS-derived mean values were calculated for 24 research units, jointly defined by country (four countries involved), gender (male, female) and age (younger, middle-aged and older). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated and correlation diagrams were drawn. CONCLUSION: The results of this preliminary analysis show that there is value in the nutritional information derived from HBSs. However, additional and more sophisticated work is required, in order to derive reliable point and interval estimates of individual food consumption based on HBS data.
PubMed ID
11924941 View in PubMed
Less detail