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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Gas gangrene panophthalmitis. A case from Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35716
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1994 Aug;72(4):524-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
M. La Cour
A. Nørgaard
J U Prause
E. Scherfig
Author Affiliation
University Eye Department, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1994 Aug;72(4):524-8
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Chamber - injuries
Child
Eye Foreign Bodies - complications
Eye Infections, Bacterial - complications
Eye Injuries, Penetrating - complications
Gas Gangrene - etiology
Greenland
Humans
Lens, Crystalline - injuries
Male
Necrosis
Panophthalmitis - etiology - microbiology
Abstract
A case of clostridium perfringens gas gangrene panophthalmitis developed after a penetrating eye injury. The affected eye became amaurotic, but the panophthalmitis was controlled by minimal surgical debridement and systemic antibiotic therapy with penicillin, fucidic acid and metronidazole. Elective enucleation was performed 15 days after the trauma for cosmetic reasons. The enucleated eye was examined histopathologically and showed massive retinal necrosis but no signs of bacteriae.
PubMed ID
7825424 View in PubMed
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[Immunity to diphtheria in the 30-70 year-age group].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236274
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Nov 24;148(48):3248-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1986

[Immunity to tetanus in persons 30 to 70 years old].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236548
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Sep 15;148(38):2426-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1986

[Polyarthritis in Denmark and its social aspect.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14969
Source
Sem Hop. 1950 Apr 22;26(30):1396-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-1950
Author
A. NORGAARD
Source
Sem Hop. 1950 Apr 22;26(30):1396-7
Date
Apr-22-1950
Language
Undetermined
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis
PubMed ID
15418228 View in PubMed
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Severe postpartum haemorrhage and mode of delivery: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127224
Source
BJOG. 2012 Apr;119(5):596-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
C. Holm
J. Langhoff-Roos
K B Petersen
A. Norgaard
B R Diness
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet - Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. charlotteholm@dadlnet.dk
Source
BJOG. 2012 Apr;119(5):596-604
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Erythrocyte Transfusion - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the association between intended mode of delivery and severe postpartum haemorrhage.
A retrospective cohort study.
Material from a nationwide study in Denmark.
Danish women giving birth in 2001-08.
We compared use of red blood cell transfusion by intended mode of delivery in the total population (n = 382 266), in low-risk nulliparous women (n = 147 132) and in women with a previous caesarean delivery (n = 25 156).
Red blood cell transfusion within 7 days of delivery.
In the total population the crude transfusion rates for women with planned caesarean delivery and intended vaginal delivery were 2.24 and 1.75%. After adjustment for maternal age, body mass index, birthweight, smoking, parity, number of infants and previous caesarean delivery, the risk of red blood cell transfusion was significantly lower in women with planned caesarean delivery compared with intended vaginal delivery (odds ratio 0.82; 95% CI 0.73-0.92; P
Notes
Comment In: BJOG. 2012 Jul;119(8):1017-8; author reply 101822703428
PubMed ID
22313728 View in PubMed
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Three-year follow-up of implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice in a tertiary hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282227
Source
Vox Sang. 2017 Apr;112(3):229-239
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
A. Norgaard
J. Stensballe
T H de Lichtenberg
J O White
A. Perner
M. Wanscher
J. Hillingsø
M L Holm
M. Mau-Sørensen
H. Sillesen
L. Kjeldsen
C. Bäck
J. Nielsen
J. Seeberg
M B Hansen
P I Johansson
Source
Vox Sang. 2017 Apr;112(3):229-239
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Tertiary Care Centers
Abstract
Traditionally, Denmark has had a high rate of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion caused by a liberal transfusion practice despite the existence of restrictive guidelines. We established a Patient Blood Management programme in a tertiary hospital and report the results of the implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice.
Red blood cell transfusion quality indicators were compared with the evidence-based guideline at hospital and department level. Based on this evaluation, wards were selected for interventions targeting doctors and nurses. The implementation process was monitored by transfusion quality and utilization data over a 3-year period with totally 166 341 admissions in 98 960 mixed, adult medical and surgical patients.
At the hospital level, transfusion above the upper guideline limit decreased from 23 to 10% (P
PubMed ID
28220499 View in PubMed
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Tobacco consumption in Denmark. III. The Danish National Morbidity Survey of 1950 communication No. 15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68214
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1959 Mar;6(2):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1959
Author
A. NORGAARD
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1959 Mar;6(2):54-8
Date
Mar-1959
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Smoking
PubMed ID
13639599 View in PubMed
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Transfusion-associated anaphylaxis during anaesthesia and surgery--a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258992
Source
Vox Sang. 2014 Aug;107(2):158-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
G. Lindsted
R. Larsen
M. Krøigaard
L H Garvey
L K Poulsen
H. Mosbech
B. Sørensen
A. Norgaard
Source
Vox Sang. 2014 Aug;107(2):158-65
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anaphylaxis - etiology
Blood Safety
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Denmark
Female
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Transfusion-associated anaphylaxis (TAA) is a severe adverse reaction reported to occur in 1:9000-90,000 transfusions. According to the Danish Registration of Transfusion Risks (DART), the frequency is 1:300,000 transfusions, which suggests insufficient reporting of TAA in Denmark. Our aims were to identify possible cases of TAA, to characterize their symptoms and tryptase levels and to investigate the reporting of TAA to the haemovigilance systems.
We reviewed 245 patients with suspected allergic reactions during anaesthesia and surgery, investigated at the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC). Based on the outcome of this investigation, the patients were classified as DAAC positive (confirmed hypersensitivity to identified agent, n = 112), or DAAC negative (no confirmed hypersensitivity, n = 133). Data on case history, details of blood transfusion and results of laboratory and clinical investigations were collected. TAA cases were identified according to the recommendations of the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT).
Ten possible TAA cases (30% of all transfused patients) were identified, all DAAC negative. The frequency of elevated serum tryptase, hypotension and male sex was significantly higher among these cases compared with the remaining DAAC negative (P
PubMed ID
24552135 View in PubMed
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Two cases of human urinary tract infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58713
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Sep;31(3):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
F. Scheutz
B. Olesen
A. Nørgaard
Author Affiliation
The International Escherichia and Klebsiella Centre (World Health Organization), Department of Gastrointestinal Infections, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. fsc@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Sep;31(3):815-6
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification - metabolism
Escherichia coli Infections - complications - microbiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - complications - microbiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Shiga Toxins - biosynthesis
Urinary Tract Infections - complications - microbiology
Abstract
In 1993, 2 cases of urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli were diagnosed at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark. Neither of the patients had any previous history of diarrhea. We suggest that E. coli strains isolated from UTI be examined for the production of verotoxin when hemolytic uremic syndrome is clinically suspected.
PubMed ID
11017837 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.