Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Are anxiety and depression related to gastrointestinal symptoms in the general population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46021
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2002 Mar;37(3):294-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
T Tangen Haug
A. Mykletun
A A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, Haukeland Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway. mphth@pop3.uib.no
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2002 Mar;37(3):294-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In clinical studies there is a strong relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms, anxiety and depression. The results may be biased, however, since anxiety and depression will influence the decision to consult a doctor. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between these symptoms in the population. METHODS: In the Health Study of Nord-Tr?ndelag County of Norway (HUNT) a questionnaire concerning physical and mental health, demographic and life-style factors was sent to all inhabitants aged 20 years and above (a total of 94,197 persons). Valid questionnaires were returned by 62,651 persons (66.5%). Presence of nausea, heartburn, diarrhoea and constipation during the last year was self-reported. Anxiety disorders and depression were based on self-ratings of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: 48% of the population reported one or more of the four gastrointestinal symptoms. Based on the HADS ratings, 15.3% of the population had an anxiety disorder and 10.4% a depression. Anxiety disorder was most strongly associated with nausea (OR 3.42). Anxiety was also associated with heartburn, diarrhoea and constipation, but weaker than with nausea. Depression was less strongly associated with the four gastrointestinal symptoms. Demographic factors, life-style factors and extra-gastrointestinal complaints could not explain the effect of anxiety disorders and depression on these gastrointestinal symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In this population study there was a strong relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms, anxiety disorders and depression. These findings suggest that mental disorders in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are not merely a consequence of selection bias in patient materials but connected to the symptoms themselves.
PubMed ID
11916191 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between age and depression in the general population: a multivariate examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45951
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Feb;107(2):132-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
E. Stordal
A. Mykletun
A A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Namsos, Norway. eystein.stordal@hnt.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Feb;107(2):132-41
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Depression - psychology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In a large general population study we found a close to linear rise with age in the mean score and prevalence of self-reported symptoms of depression. The aim of this study was to examine if this linear relation prevailed when controlled for multiple variables and to examine factors that eventually explained the association. METHOD: Among individuals aged 20-89 years living in Nord-Trøndelag County of Norway, 60 869 filled in valid ratings of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as well as many other variables. Covariates were grouped into a multivariate model with six blocks. Logistic regression was used to model the blocks and variables with caseness of depression as the dependent variable. RESULTS: The model explains a considerable part of the age-related pattern on depression. The pattern became less distinct in the age groups above 50 years. Variables within the blocks of somatic diagnoses and symptoms, as well as impairment, had most explanatory power. CONCLUSION: Because of our large sample we were able to control for more relevant variables than earlier studies. In contrast to most other studies, we found that an age-related increase of the prevalence of depression persisted after control for multiple variables.
PubMed ID
12534439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer patients' awareness about their diagnosis: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17957
Source
J Public Health Med. 2003 Dec;25(4):313-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
C. Nord
A. Mykletun
S D Fosså
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Cancer Research, University Hospital, The Norwegian Radiumhospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. carina.nord@klinmed.uio.no
Source
J Public Health Med. 2003 Dec;25(4):313-7
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Awareness
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate Norwegian cancer patients' awareness of their prior cancer diagnosis in a general population-based study. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based study of cancer patients' responses to the index question: 'Do you have or have you had cancer?' was carried out. We assessed correctness of the response in relation to cancer site, date of diagnosis, marital status, age and education. Smoking was chosen as a marker of health awareness. A total of 65,330 persons participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT-II), performed in 1995-1997. The database of HUNT-II was merged with the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), thus identifying each of the 2983 (4 percent) participants with an invasive cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: Excluding basal cell epithelioma, a total of 20 percent of the patients denied their prior cancer diagnosis. This group consisted mainly of men (54 percent) and those who were diagnosed as very young or as elderly. More smokers than non-smokers were unaware of their prior malignancy (24 percent versus 20 percent). CONCLUSIONS: A 20 percent rate of patients who denied their former malignancy is surprisingly and unacceptably high. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis should help the patient to develop increased health awareness. It should enable a person to report his or her former cancer diagnosis when necessary.
PubMed ID
14747590 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294916
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2017 Dec 02; 67(8):644-647
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-02-2017
Author
H P Nordhagen
S B Harvey
E O Rosvold
D Bruusgaard
R Blonk
A Mykletun
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Labor and Welfare Administration, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2017 Dec 02; 67(8):644-647
Date
Dec-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
General Practitioners - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Organizational Policy
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
General practitioners (GPs) report sickness absence certification as challenging. They express need for support with functional assessment beyond guidelines and reforms. Case-specific collegial one-to-one guidance for other clinical topics has proved popular with GPs and may be an acceptable and effective way to improve GPs skills and competence in sickness absence certification.
To present a new model of case-specific colleague guidance focusing on the management of long-term sickness absence and to describe its feasibility in terms of application and reception among GPs, and also GPs' self-reports of effects on their practice.
Randomly selected GPs received case-specific collegial guidance over a 12-month period, in two Norwegian trials, delivered by former GPs employed by the social security administration. We measured reception and perceived effects by GPs' self-report and registered participation and withdrawal rates.
The participation rate (n = 165) was 94%, and no GPs withdrew during training. Among the 116 GPs responding to the survey (70%), 112 (97%; 95% CI 92-99) stated they would recommend it to their colleagues. Considerable benefit from the guidance was reported by 68 (59%; 95% CI 50-68). The GPs self-reported other effects on their sickness absence certification, specifically an increased use of part-time sickness absence (Fit-Note equivalent).
This model of case-specific colleague guidance to aid GPs' management of long-term sickness absence is feasible and was popular. This type of guidance was perceived by GPs to be somewhat beneficial and to alter their sickness absence certification behaviour, though the true impact requires further testing in controlled trials.
PubMed ID
29016957 View in PubMed
Less detail

Common mental disorders and long-term sickness absence in a general working population. The Hordaland Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122775
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2013 Apr;127(4):287-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
A K Knudsen
S B Harvey
A. Mykletun
S. Øverland
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Development, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway. ann.knudsen@psych.uib.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2013 Apr;127(4):287-97
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine and compare the prospective effect of the common mental disorders (CMD) anxiety and depression on duration and recurrence of sickness absence (SA), and to investigate whether the effect of CMD on SA is detectable over time.
Information from a large epidemiological health study (N = 13 436) was linked with official records of SA episodes lasting =16 days up to 6 years after participation. Common mental disorders were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Associations were analysed with Cox regression and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for potential covariates.
Comorbid anxiety and depression, and anxiety only were significant risk factors for SA after adjusting for covariates, whilst depression only was not. Anxiety and depression were stronger predictors for longer duration of SA episodes compared with shorter duration and associated with more frequent recurrence of SA. There was a general trend toward the effect of CMD on SA becoming weaker over time; however, the effect of anxiety only on SA remained stable throughout the follow-up.
Common mental disorders are long-lasting predictors of onset, duration and recurrence of SA. Anxiety appears to be a more important contributor to long-term SA than previously described in the literature.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2013 Jul;128(1):9923438286
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2013 Jul;128(1):98-923438311
PubMed ID
22775341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comprehensive schoolteachers at risk of early exit from work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200161
Source
Exp Aging Res. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Author
R J Mykletun
A. Mykletun
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Hotel Management, Stavanger, Norway. reidar.j.mykletun@nhs.his.no
Source
Exp Aging Res. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):359-65
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Burnout, Professional
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Retirement
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Stress, Physiological - physiopathology
Teaching
Time Factors
Abstract
Risk of early exit from work for teachers was operationalized as high burnout scores, working part-time due to heavy burden and illness or working part-time while also receiving partial disability pension. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires in a cross-sectional study to a random sample of Norwegian comprehensive schoolteachers, response rate = 86% (N = 1860 valid cases). High age increased the risk of early exit from work, but for cynicism the age effect disappeared when sense of competence and stress were introduced in the regression model. Age had no effect for low professional efficacy. Sense of competence effected burnout, but actual competence level and the gap between actual competence and teaching obligations did not. Stress effected all measures of risk of early exit, especially exhaustion. Change as stress factor increased the exhaustion scores, and were also relevant to risk of having a part-time position, and/or partial disability pension.
PubMed ID
10553518 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression in relation to age and gender in the general population: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46082
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Sep;104(3):210-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
E. Stordal
M. Bjartveit Krüger
N H Dahl
Ø. Krüger
A. Mykletun
A A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Namdal Hospital, Namsos, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Sep;104(3):210-6
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Previous sample studies of depression have shown a higher prevalence of depression in women, and an inconsistent relation to age has been found for both genders. The aim of the present study was to investigate depression in relation to gender and age in the general adult population. METHOD: Of the total population of 92,100 individuals aged 20-89 years and living in Nord-Trøndelag county of Norway, 62,344 (67.7%) filled in valid ratings of depression on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: Minimal gender difference was found in dimensional depression scores and in prevalence rates of depression. Both these measures were found to increase continuously with age in both genders. CONCLUSION: Our results of this population-based study differ from most sample studies reported, and these discrepancies are discussed with focus on study design, self-rating, and the concept of depression covered by HADS.
PubMed ID
11531658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Executive functions and seizure-related factors in children with epilepsy in western Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76201
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2006 Jun;48(6):519-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
B. Høie
A. Mykletun
Pe Waaler
H. Skeidsvoll
K. Sommerfelt
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2006 Jun;48(6):519-25
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Executive functions (EFs), seizure-related factors, and school performance were studied in a population-based sample of children with epilepsy (n=117; 71 males, 46 females; mean age 10y 5mo [SD 2y]; range 6y-12y 11mo) and a comparison group (n=124; 71 males, 53 females; mean age 10y 1mo [SD 2y 1mo]; range 6y-12y 11mo). EF, cognitive function, depression, socioeconomic status, and school performance were examined. Patients with epilepsy performed significantly lower than the comparison group on all EF measures except incidental memory. Intellectual dysfunction and depression accounted for 43% of EF problems. All epilepsy syndrome groups (except Rolandic epilepsy) were associated with decreased EF in addition to early epilepsy onset, high seizure frequency, and polytherapy. Patients had more school performance problems than comparison children which were attributed partly to EF difficulties. All aspects of EF were affected in children with epilepsy and all epilepsy syndrome groups, except Rolandic epilepsy, influenced EF negatively. EF problems contributed to patients' school difficulties beyond intellectual dysfunction.
PubMed ID
16700947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Explaining the gender gap in sickness absence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297497
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2018 06 20; 68(5):320-326
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-20-2018
Author
K A Østby
A Mykletun
W Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2018 06 20; 68(5):320-326
Date
06-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parents
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In many western countries, women have a much higher rate of sickness absence than men. To what degree the gender differences in sickness absence are caused by gender differences in health is largely unknown.
To assess to what degree the gender gap in sickness absence can be explained by health factors and work- and family-related stressors.
Norwegian parents participating in the Tracking Opportunities and Problems (TOPP) study were asked about sickness absence and a range of factors possibly contributing to gender differences in sickness absence, including somatic and mental health, sleep problems, job control/demands, work-home conflicts, parent-child conflicts and stressful life events. Using a cross-sectional design, we did linear regression analyses, to assess the relative contribution from health and stressors.
There were 557 study participants. Adjusting for health factors reduced the gender difference in sickness absence by 24%, while adjusting for stressors in the family and at work reduced the difference by 22%. A simultaneous adjustment for health factors and stressors reduced the difference in sickness absence by about 28%.
Despite adjusting for a large number of factors, including both previously well-studied factors (e.g. health, job control/demands) and lesser-studied factors (parent-child conflict and sexual assault), this study found that most of the gender gap in sickness absence remains unexplained. Gender differences in health and stressors account for only part of the differences in sickness absence. Other factors must, therefore, exist outside the domains of health, work and family stressors.
PubMed ID
29672758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Farmers are at risk for anxiety and depression: the Hordaland Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45832
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2004 Mar;54(2):92-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
B. Sanne
A. Mykletun
B E Moen
A A Dahl
G S Tell
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Bjarte.Sanne@isf.uib.no
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2004 Mar;54(2):92-100
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Epidemiologic Methods
Exertion
Female
Humans
Income
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Workload
Abstract
AIMS: To examine whether, and why, farmers and non-farmers differ regarding levels of anxiety and depression. METHODS: The study encompassed 17 295 workers age 40-49 years, including 917 farmers, from the population-based Hordaland Health Study 1997-99 (HUSK). Levels of anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively). Self-reported information on various work-related factors, demographics, lifestyle and somatic health problems was included. The main analytical methods were univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Kruskal-Wallis test, chi(2)/Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared with non-farmers, farmers had higher levels and prevalences of depression, particularly the male farmers, who also had higher anxiety levels. Among men, farmers reported longer work hours, lower income, higher psychological job demands and less decision latitude compared with non-farmers. Farmers had physically heavier work and a lower level of education than non-farmers. Generally, the differences were largest between full-time farmers and non-farmers. Differences in anxiety and depression levels between male full-time farmers and non-farmers could be explained by the farmers' longer work hours, physically harder work and lower income. CONCLUSIONS: Farming is associated with increased levels of anxiety and increased levels and prevalences of depression. As regards depression, preventative measures and screening for cases in need of treatment should be strongly considered.
PubMed ID
15020727 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.