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Age at first birth, parity and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of 8 studies from the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25102
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Oct 15;46(4):597-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1990
Author
M. Ewertz
S W Duffy
H O Adami
G. Kvåle
E. Lund
O. Meirik
A. Mellemgaard
I. Soini
H. Tulinius
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copehagen.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Oct 15;46(4):597-603
Date
Oct-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Iceland
Maternal Age
Meta-Analysis
Norway
Parity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Several large epidemiological studies in the Nordic countries have failed to confirm an association between age at first birth and breast cancer independent of parity. To assess whether lack of power or heterogeneity between the countries could explain this, a meta-analysis was performed of 8 population-based studies (3 cohort and 5 case-control) of breast cancer and reproductive variables in the Nordic countries, including a total of 5,568 cases. It confirmed that low parity and late age at first birth are significant and independent determinants of breast-cancer risk. Nulliparity was associated with a 30% increase in risk compared with parous women, and for every 2 births, the risk was reduced by about 16%. There was a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing age at first birth, women giving first birth after the age of 35 years having a 40% increased risk compared to those with a first birth before the age of 20 years. Tests for heterogeneity between studies were not significant for any of the examined variables. In the absence of bias, this suggests that several individual Nordic studies may have had too little power to detect the weak effect of age at first birth observed in the meta-analysis.
PubMed ID
2145231 View in PubMed
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The association between risk of breast cancer and age at first pregnancy and parity in Maribo County, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25347
Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(6):705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Mellemgaard
M. Ewertz
E. Lynge
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(6):705-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Parity
Risk factors
Abstract
The effect of age at first pregnancy and number of pregnancies was examined in a cohort of 14,421 women where reproductive informations were collected as part of a cervical cancer screening program. A total of 352 cases occurred in the cohort. In subgroups of women defined by age at first pregnancy the relative risk of breast cancer was lower among women who were first pregnant before 25 years of age (RR = 0.85 vs 1.20). In subgroups of women defined by parity the relative risk decreased with increasing number of pregnancies from about unity among women with 0-3 pregnancies to 0.7 among women with 6 or more pregnancies.
PubMed ID
2223139 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in men with Klinefelter syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23325
Source
Br J Cancer. 1995 Feb;71(2):416-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
H. Hasle
A. Mellemgaard
J. Nielsen
J. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1995 Feb;71(2):416-20
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Genital Neoplasms, Male - epidemiology
Germinoma - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Klinefelter Syndrome - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology
Lymphoma - epidemiology
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Risk
Risk factors
Abstract
Many case reports have suggested an association between Klinefelter syndrome (KS) and cancer, but studies of the cancer incidence in larger groups of men with KS are lacking. A cohort of 696 men with KS was established from the Danish Cytogenetic Register. Information on the cancer incidence in the cohort was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry and compared with the expected number calculated from the age, period and site specific cancer rates for Danish men. A total of 39 neoplasms were diagnosed (relative risk = 1.1). Four mediastinal tumours were observed (relative risk = 67); all four were malignant germ cell tumours. No cases of breast cancer or testis cancer were observed. One case of prostate cancer occurred within a previously irradiated field. No excess of leukaemia or lymphoma was found. An increased risk of cancer occurred in the age group 15-30 years (relative risk = 2.7). All six tumours in this group were germ cell tumours or sarcomas. The overall cancer incidence is not increased and no routine cancer screening seems to be justified. A considerably elevated risk of mediastinal germ cell tumours occurs in the period from early adolescence until the age of 30.
PubMed ID
7841064 View in PubMed
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[Cancer of the bile ducts in Denmark, 1943-1982]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26028
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Dec 7;149(50):3423-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-7-1987

[Colorectal cancer in Denmark 1943-1982. Cancer statistics no. 16]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26179
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Jan 12;149(3):188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1987
Author
A. Mellemgaard
E. Lynge
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Jan 12;149(3):188-91
Date
Jan-12-1987
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
3824582 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Colorectal cancer in Denmark 1943-1988]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23509
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Oct 3;156(40):5840-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1994
Author
C. Johansen
A. Mellemgaard
T B Skov
J. Kjaergaard
E. Lynge
Author Affiliation
Kraeftens Bekaempelse, sektor for kraeftepidemiologi, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Oct 3;156(40):5840-3
Date
Oct-3-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
Nation-wide incidence rates are presented of colorectal cancer in Denmark from 1943 to 1988. In Denmark notification of malignant and related diseases is mandatory. The percentage of histologically confirmed tumours is now 95. The annual incidence rate of colon cancer in Denmark has been increasing among men and women combined from 684 cases in 1943-1947 to 2020 cases in 1988. In the same period the incidence of rectal cancer has increased from 762 cases in 1943-1947 to 1108 cases in 1988. We analyzed the effects of age, calender time, and birth cohort with multiplicative Poisson models. We did not find consistent period effects in the models. We suggest an etiologic distinction between carcinoma of the rectum, the left colon and the right colon.
PubMed ID
7985275 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer in Denmark 1943-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24102
Source
Int J Colorectal Dis. 1993 Mar;8(1):42-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
C. Johansen
A. Mellemgaard
T. Skov
J. Kjaergaard
E. Lynge
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, København.
Source
Int J Colorectal Dis. 1993 Mar;8(1):42-7
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Effect
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Poisson Distribution
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Nation-wide incidence rates are presented of colorectal cancer in Denmark from 1943 to 1988. In Denmark notification of malignant and related diseases is mandatory. The percentage of histologically confirmed tumours is now 95. The annual incidence rate of colon cancer in Denmark has been increasing among men and women combined from 684 cases in 1943-47 to 2020 cases in 1988. In the same period the incidence of rectal cancer has been increasing from 762 cases in 1943-47 to 1108 cases in 1988. We analyzed the effects of age, calendar time, and birth cohort with multiplicative Poisson models. We did not find consistent period effects in the models. We suggest the trends in colorectal cancer incidence rates may be due to changes in environmental factors such as dietary habits and in physical activity. Furthermore, we suggest an etiologic distinction between carcinoma of the rectum, the left colon and the right colon.
PubMed ID
8492043 View in PubMed
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Dietary risk factors for renal cell carcinoma in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22695
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
K. Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Fats
Dietary Proteins
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals
Sex Factors
Vitamins
Abstract
The role of diet in the aetiology of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in a population-based case-control study in Denmark. Cases were 20-79 years old, with a histologically verified diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Controls were sampled from the general population and were frequency-matched on age and sex. A total of 351 cases (73% of the eligible) and 340 controls (68% of the eligible) were included in the study. Dietary information was obtained in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and the information was confirmed in a subsequent interview performed by trained interviewers who also elicited information on other suspected risk factors such as smoking, occupation, medical history, education and reproductive history. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios, and, both frequency of consumption of various food stuffs and computed nutrients were examined. A positive association was observed between risk of renal cell carcinoma and total energy intake (odds ratio, OR, for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.7 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.0-3.0) for men, and 3.5 (95% CI 1.6-6.5) for women), fat intake (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.9 (95% CI 1.1-3.5) for men, and 3.3 (95% CI 1.6-6.9) for women). For women, an effect was also seen for intake of carbohydrates (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 3.2 (95% CI 1.5-6.8), while no protective effect was seen for vegetables or fruit. Dairy products may be associated with risk of renal cell cancer (OR for women using thickly spread butter compared to thinly spread: 11.4 (95% CI 2.8-45), OR for women who drank more than one glass of milk with 3.5% fat content compared to never drink milk: 3.7 (95% CI 1.2-11). As expected, total energy intake, intake of fat, protein and carbohydrates were closely correlated making it difficult to identify one of the energy sources as more closely associated with risk of renal cell cancer than the other. Several energy sources have been identified as possible risk factors for renal cell carcinoma. It is possible that a high energy intake as such rather than the individual sources are responsible for the increased risk. Furthermore, dairy fats may be associated with renal cell carcinoma risk. The observed associations appeared stronger in women, and did not explain the association with obesity and low socio-economic status previously found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
8695272 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology and risk factors for cancer of the extrahepatic bile ducts]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26029
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Dec 7;149(50):3421-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-7-1987

High and low risk groups for cancer of colon and rectum in Denmark: multiplicative Poisson models applied to register linkage data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25797
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1988 Sep;42(3):249-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
A. Mellemgaard
G. Engholm
E. Lynge
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1988 Sep;42(3):249-56
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark
Educational Status
Epidemiologic Methods
Housing
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Probability
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiplicative Poisson models were used to identify subgroups of the Danish population at high and low risk of developing cancer of the right or left side of the colon, and cancer of the rectum. The analysis was based on cross-linked data from the 1970 census and the Danish Cancer Registry, where a 10-year follow-up period yielded some 20,000 colo-rectal cancers, in approximately 2.5 million persons. The risk of cancer of the right side of the colon in longer educated men living in apartment houses was almost twice as high as in farmers living in single family houses (relative risk 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.42-2.37). A two-fold ratio (RR 2.18; 95% CI 1.70-2.62) was also seen in the risk of cancer of the left side of the colon between men with longer education in Greater Copenhagen and farmers in Jutland. The annual number of colon cancer cases in men in Denmark could be reduced by 27% if the incidence for all men was equal to that found for the low risk group of farmers.
PubMed ID
3251005 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.