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Amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen: a new prognosis indicator in human ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25549
Source
Cancer Res. 1989 Apr 1;49(7):1885-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1989
Author
A. Kauppila
U. Puistola
J. Risteli
L. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Res. 1989 Apr 1;49(7):1885-9
Date
Apr-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate - analysis
Female
Humans
Laparotomy
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - drug therapy
Peptide Fragments - blood
Procollagen - blood
Prognosis
Abstract
To investigate the clinical usefulness of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) as an indicator of ovarian cancer behavior, 30 patients with advanced epithelial malignancy were monitored with serial serum PIIINP and CA-125 determinations before and during treatment. Initially, PIIINP and CA-125 concentrations were each separately increased in 87% of the cases and, simultaneously, in 77% of the cases. In monitoring treatment responses, PIIINP and CA-125 were identical in 17 patients (57%), both being good predictors of the clinical behavior of the disease in 16 cases and poor predictors in one case. In 13 patients (43%) they were complementary to each other. In three cases PIIINP alone and in one case CA-125 alone were clinically useful prognosis indicators. During the period of complete clinical response to cytotoxic chemotherapy of 16 patients, the CA-125 concentrations decreased to normal before the clinical disappearance of the tumor in eight cases. PIIINP did so in only two cases, thus correlating more precisely with the presence of malignancy. In second-look laparotomies, PIIINP concentrations correlated with the presence of occult cancer better than those of CA-125. In predicting recurrent malignancy in patients with transient complete response, PIIINP and CA-125 were clinically equal. According to the present data, PIIINP concentrations often give information not obtainable by CA-125, thus being useful in monitoring the clinical behavior of ovarian cancer.
PubMed ID
2924328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in ovarian cancer. A review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24596
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1992;155:99-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
L. Risteli
J. Risteli
U. Puistola
C. Tomás
G G Zhu
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1992;155:99-103
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate - analysis
Endometrial Neoplasms - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis
Peptide Fragments - blood
Procollagen - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
The concentration of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) in serum is a measure of the activity of the metabolism of type III collagen, which is a major constituent of soft connective tissues and of the connective tissue stroma of solid tumours. In advanced ovarian carcinoma, serum PIIINP serves as a tumour-associated antigen, its changes reflecting and preceding changes in the clinical behaviour of the malignancy. Elevated values of serum PIIINP are also observed in endometrial and cervical malignancies, though less frequently than in ovarian tumours. Very high concentrations of PIIINP are found in ovarian carcinoma ascites, suggesting an ongoing fibro-proliferative reaction in the peritoneal cavity as a response to the tumour.
PubMed ID
1502898 View in PubMed
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Aminoterminal propeptide of type-III procollagen in serum--an indicator of clinical behavior of advanced ovarian carcinoma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25887
Source
Int J Cancer. 1988 Mar 15;41(3):409-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1988
Author
L. Risteli
A. Kauppila
U M Mäkilä
J. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Collagen Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1988 Mar 15;41(3):409-14
Date
Mar-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - drug therapy - surgery
Peptide Fragments - blood
Procollagen - blood
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In ovarian carcinoma, elevated serum concentrations of the aminoterminal propeptide of type-III procollagen are related to the clinical stage of the disease and to the presence of ascites, which contains very high concentrations of the propeptide. In a follow-up of patients with advanced disease, favorable clinical course was associated with normalizing propeptide values, whereas in progressing disease the values increased several weeks before clinical progression. In stable disease the concentrations were constantly above the reference range. Laminin and type-IV-collagen-related serum antigens were mostly within the reference range.
PubMed ID
3346105 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A national clinical treatment trial of ovarian cancer].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251590
Source
Duodecim. 1976;92(24):1449-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976

Carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) in predicting prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19716
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2001 Jul;82(1):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
M. Simojoki
M. Santala
J. Risteli
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Oulu, FIN-90220, Finland.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2001 Jul;82(1):110-5
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
CA-125 Antigen - blood
Comparative Study
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Procollagen - blood
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of serum carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) in ovarian cancer. Serum CA125 was used as a reference marker. METHODS: Forty-five patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were monitored with serial measurements of serum concentrations of ICTP, a degradation product of type I collagen likely to come about via the matrix metalloproteinase pathway. RESULTS: The patients with a good prognosis had significantly lower serum ICTP concentrations than the patients with a poor prognosis both before the operation and at all the postoperative time points studied (3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months), whereas a corresponding difference in CA125 was first seen after a 12-month follow-up. In multivariate regression analysis, the 9-month serum ICTP concentration remained the only independent prognostic indicator of all biochemical, clinical, and histological variables. The postoperative serum ICTP concentration did not correlate with the clinical stage, the grade of differentiation, or the presence of residual tumor. In contrast to ICTP, postoperative serum CA125 correlated with the clinical stage and the presence of residual tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Because our ICTP test does not detect defectively cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptides of type I collagen, which is the predominant form in malignant ovarian tissue, the excess ICTP of ovarian cancer patients must originate from the tissue around the tumor, where the malignancy is causing tissue damage. As an indicator of invasion, the serum ICTP test opens up new possibilities to assess the clinical behavior of ovarian cancer and, in the future, also the effect of possible antiproteinase treatment in ovarian cancer.
PubMed ID
11426971 View in PubMed
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Changing concepts of medical treatment of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23987
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Jul;72(5):324-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Jul;72(5):324-36
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Danazol - therapeutic use
Delayed-Action Preparations - therapeutic use
Dysmenorrhea - drug therapy - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - therapy
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - complications - therapy
Gonadorelin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Humans
Infertility, Female - drug therapy - etiology
Laparoscopy
Progestins - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Prostaglandin Antagonists - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials
Triptorelin - analogs & derivatives
Abstract
Studies on the natural history of endometriosis have demonstrated that the majority of endometriosis implants tend to progress, a finding that indicates eradication of the lesions by medical and/or surgical approaches. Infertility and dysmenorrhea are other indications for medical therapy in this disease. In recent prospective and controlled studies, progestin (at high doses), gestrinone and GnRH agonist analogues have been equally effective as regards elimination of endometriosis and relief of endometriosis-associated symptoms, compared to danazol, a standard treatment in endometriosis. These four classes of drugs differ, however, in their adverse effects and as regards compliance. Danazol is a steroid with androgenic and anabolic effects and it adversely affects lipid metabolism. Gestrinone and 17-OH progestins are weaker, and GnRH agonist analogues and some progestins neutral in these respects. GnRH agonist analogues induce a hypo-estrogenic state with associated climacteric symptoms and mineral loss from the bones. The clinical value of combinations of GnRH analogue and steroid(s), used to prevent these side-effects, is so far unclear. Laparoscopic microsurgery has revolutionized the treatment of endometriosis lesions. Hence, hormone treatment as a supplement to microsurgical approaches may become a dominant form of medical therapy in endometriosis. The definitive value of pre- or post-operative hormonal treatment in this disease should, however, be tested in controlled trials. Such studies have proved antiprostaglandins to be useful in the treatment of dysmenorrhea secondary to endometriosis. Because each of the four drugs was ineffective in the treatment of infertility associated with endometriosis it is a waste of time to expose patients desiring pregnancy to long-term hormonal therapy. Ovarian hyperstimulation with IVF and other methods of assisted fertilisation are promising alternatives, but their definitive value is so far unproven in this disease. Conclusively, the significance of medical therapy in endometriosis is only partly resolved, and therefore, many therapeutic problems await prospective randomised trials and new innovations.
PubMed ID
8392260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chromosome 11q22.3-q25 LOH in ovarian cancer: association with a more aggressive disease course and involved subregions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21362
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1998 Nov;71(2):299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
V. Launonen
F. Stenbäck
U. Puistola
R. Bloigu
P. Huusko
S. Kytölä
A. Kauppila
R. Winqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Genetics, Department of Pathology, University of Oulu/Oulu University Hospital, Kajaanintie 50, Oulu, FIN-90220, Finland.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1998 Nov;71(2):299-304
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
Female
Genetic markers
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Chromosome 11q deletions are common in various malignancies, including ovarian cancer. However, the clinical significance of these genetic lesions as well as their more precise chromosomal location is largely unknown. Here we have examined epithelial ovarian cancer material from 49 patients for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using nine microsatellite markers on 11q22.3-q25 and evaluated the effect of observed deletions with regard to different clinicopathological variables. LOH was detected in 61% of the patients. Interestingly, LOH for the D11S1340 marker locus at 11q23. 3 seemed to be associated with significantly reduced survival times (P = 0.005) and serous tumor histology (P = 0.036). LOH for D11S912 at the more distal 11q24-q25 location correlated with a higher tumor stage (P = 0.003), serous tumor histology (P = 0.015), and finding of residual tumor (P = 0.047), but not directly with survival times (P = 0.320). The majority of the analyzed tumors simultaneously displayed deletions at two distinct 11q regions, A and B, which are proximal and distal to D11S1347/NCAM (11q23.2-q23.3), respectively. Only LOH for two markers (D11S1340 and D11S912) of the B region seemed to be directly associated with a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, it appears that deletions of the ataxia telangectasia gene of the A region would not be crucial for determining the outcome of ovarian cancer. Our present results indicate that a survival factor gene in ovarian cancer would be located close to D11S1340 at 11q23.3. This corresponds well to our earlier observation in breast cancer, suggesting the involvement of a shared survival factor gene in both diseases.
PubMed ID
9826475 View in PubMed
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The clinical outcome in pregnancies of grand grand multiparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48149
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1997 Sep;76(8):755-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
K. Juntunen
P. Kirkinen
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
The Family Federation, Infertility Clinic of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1997 Sep;76(8):755-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth Order
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Longitudinal Studies
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To longitudinally evaluate maternal and neonatal complications with relation to birth order, with specific emphasis on grand grand multiparity (at least 10th para). METHODS: The maternal and neonatal outcome of 1200 pregnancies/deliveries in 96 grand grand multiparas was longitudinally investigated in 4 stages of the mothers' life: the primiparas, the multiparas (2nd-5th paras), the grand multiparas (6th-9th paras) and the grand grand multiparas stage. RESULTS: The frequency of hypertension, diabetes, placental complications, operative interventions at delivery, macrosomic infants, chromosomal abbreviations and fetal/neonatal anomalies increased with increasing birth order, being at a maximum in grand grand multiparas. The preterm delivery and perinatal mortality rate did not differ between the 3 groups of multiparas. Perinatal outcome was good in each group. CONCLUSIONS: Grand grand multiparity carries the risk of hypertensive and diabetic complications, which, in turn, often lead to induced or operative deliveries and placental complications. However, grand grand multiparity is not a major problem in societies with a good maternal health care system.
PubMed ID
9348253 View in PubMed
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Collagen metabolism in gynecologic patients: changes in the concentration of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in serum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25106
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1990 Oct;163(4 Pt 1):1276-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
U. Puistola
L. Risteli
J. Risteli
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1990 Oct;163(4 Pt 1):1276-81
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Collagen - metabolism
Comparative Study
Cystadenoma - blood - diagnosis - metabolism
Diagnosis, Differential
Endometriosis - blood - metabolism
Female
Follicular Phase
Genital Diseases, Female - blood - metabolism
Humans
Leiomyoma - blood - metabolism
Luteal Phase
Oophoritis - blood - metabolism
Ovarian Cysts - blood - diagnosis - metabolism
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - metabolism
Peptide Fragments - blood
Procollagen - blood
Radioimmunoassay
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salpingitis - blood - metabolism
Uterine Neoplasms - blood - metabolism
Abstract
We have previously found the serum concentration of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, an indicator of collagen metabolism, to be increased in advanced ovarian cancer. In this study we measured the serum aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen concentration in healthy women during the menstrual cycle and in patients with salpingo-oophoritis, leiomyomas, endometriosis, and benign ovarian tumors. The concentration was higher in the luteal phase than that in the follicular phase, suggesting an association of collagen metabolism with ovarian steroid hormones. Severe salpingo-oophoritis increased the serum level of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen with a decrease to normal during recovery. Elevated values were occasionally seen in endometriosis and leiomyomas. These findings indicate that the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen is a relatively unspecific indicator of ovarian carcinoma.
PubMed ID
2220941 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison between the effects of tamoxifen and toremifene on the uterus in postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23026
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1995 Nov;59(2):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
E. Tomás
A. Kauppila
G. Blanco
M. Apaja-Sarkkinen
T. Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1995 Nov;59(2):261-6
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tamoxifen - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Toremifene - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Uterus - drug effects - pathology
Vagina - drug effects - pathology
Abstract
Antiestrogens have been widely used in the treatment of breast cancer patients. We wanted to compare the uteral and vaginal effects of tamoxifen to those of toremifene. Thirty-one gynecologically asymptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients with an intact uterus were randomized to receive 20 mg of tamoxifen (N = 16) or 60 mg of toremifene (N = 15) as an adjuvant treatment. Gynecological examination with vaginal ultrasonography, Pap smear, endometrial biopsy, hysteroscopy, and curettage was performed before the treatment, and at 6 and 12 months of treatment. Endometrial thickness was found to increase significantly during the treatment to the same extent in both groups. Proliferation or other estrogenic effects in the endometrium were observed in 8 of 14 patients in the tamoxifen group and in 3 of 10 patients in the toremifene group. Three polyps occurred and previously present uterine fibroids increased in size in 3 of 10 patients during the study. Estrogenic changes in Pap smear were observed in all patients. There was no significant difference between tamoxifen and toremifene in any of the parameters investigated. Our results suggest that tamoxifen and toremifene produce comparable estrogenic effects in the uterus and vagina.
PubMed ID
7590484 View in PubMed
Less detail

72 records – page 1 of 8.