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All-cause mortality in criminal justice clients with substance use problems--a prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114341
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Oct 1;132(3):499-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2013
Author
A. Hakansson
M. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Sweden. Electronic address: anders_c.hakansson@med.lu.se.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Oct 1;132(3):499-504
Date
Oct-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Criminals
Databases, Factual - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prisoners
Prospective Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality in previously incarcerated individuals is known to be elevated, with high proportions of drug-related deaths. However, there is less documentation of whether specific substance use patterns and other clinical characteristics predict increased mortality in the group.
This is a follow-up study of mortality and causes of death in ex-prisoners with substance use problems prior to incarceration (N=4081), who were followed during an average of 3.6 years from release from prison until death or until data were censored. Baseline predictors of mortality, derived from interviews with Addiction Severity Index (ASI) in prison, were studied in a Cox regression analysis.
During follow-up, 166 subjects (4.1%) died. Standardized mortality ratios were 7.0 (3.6-12.2) for females and 7.7 (5.6-9.0) for males. In 84% of cases, deaths were unnatural or due to substance-related disease. Most common causes of death were accidental poisoning (27%), transport accidents (13%), poisoning/injury with undetermined intent (12%), and suicide (10%). Death was positively predicted by heroin use, overdose, and age, and negatively predicted by a history of depression.
A vast majority of deaths after release from prison in individuals with substance use are due to violent or substance-related causes. Significant predictors identified were mainly related to patterns of drug use, and need to be addressed upon incarceration as risk factors of death. The findings have implications for referral and treatment upon release from prison.
PubMed ID
23623042 View in PubMed
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Antenatal care in general practice in Sweden. I. A descriptive study of problems, measures and outcome in a defined population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65396
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
A. Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):137-42
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Prescriptions, Non-Drug
Sweden
Abstract
This study followed the progress of 143 expectant mothers from their registration at the antenatal clinic, via delivery, to the postnatal check-up. The population was an all-inclusive material from a well-defined geographical area. All problems arising and their treatment or other measures were recorded at the district antenatal clinic, at the district Health Centre, at the hospital antenatal clinic, and at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Common problems were backache and abdominal pain, infections in the vagina or in the urinary tract, and threat of miscarriage or premature birth. About 40% of the women had received at least one medical prescription during pregnancy, and a similar proportion were sicklisted at some time. The outcome of delivery in this material was comparable to figures for Sweden in general and to results reported from Great Britain.
PubMed ID
3222583 View in PubMed
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Antenatal care in general practice in Sweden. II. A study of work allocation between district physician and obstetrician.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65395
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
A. Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):143-8
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Midwifery
Obstetrics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Prenatal care - organization & administration
Referral and Consultation
Sweden
Abstract
In this study, 143 women were carefully observed throughout their pregnancy. The population was an all-inclusive material from a well-defined geographical area. Altogether 688 visits to the physician and 1504 visits to the midwife were registered. At the district antenatal clinic about 80% of the mothers could be helped by the district midwife and the district physician. About 10% required some specialist attention, while the remaining 10% required attention at the hospital antenatal clinic. The district physician dealt with 62% of the obstetric problems and 75% of the non-obstetric problems. The cases referred to the hospital antenatal clinic (20%) had a high proportion of complications, e.g. 54% of the caesarean sections and 43% of the babies sent to the neonatal clinic.
PubMed ID
3222584 View in PubMed
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Antenatal care in southern Sweden. A population-based prospective study describing the diagnostic panorama of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65133
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1991;70(7-8):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A. Håkansson
A. Aberg
I. Atterwall
B. Hagander
B. Scherstén
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1991;70(7-8):531-8
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
All pregnant women from the catchment areas of three health centres in southern Sweden, registered for antenatal care during the calendar year 1986, were included in the study population. Four hundred and nine women could be prospectively followed throughout pregnancy. By 15 completed weeks, 95% of the women were registered at an antenatal clinic. Only 2 women had no antenatal care at all. During the course of pregnancy the 409 women made altogether 6,058 (mean 14.8) visits to the health and medical services, most of them (95%) were to an antenatal clinic. Common obstetrical problems were vaginitis, symphysiolysis, threat of preterm labour, and vaginal bleeding; and common non-obstetrical problems were low back pain and respiratory tract infections. During pregnancy 42% of the women were prescribed some sort of medication, and 53% were sicklisted on one or more occasions. The outcome of pregnancy was comparable to figures for all Sweden.
PubMed ID
1785266 View in PubMed
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Association between the estrogen receptor beta gene and age of onset of Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179471
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004 Sep;29(8):993-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
L. Westberg
A. Håkansson
J. Melke
H Niazi Shahabi
S. Nilsson
S. Buervenich
A. Carmine
J. Ahlberg
M B Grundell
B. Schulhof
K. Klingborg
B. Holmberg
O. Sydow
L. Olson
E B Johnels
E. Eriksson
H. Nissbrandt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. lars.westberg@pharm.gu.se
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004 Sep;29(8):993-8
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 - genetics
Estrogen Receptor beta
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parkinson Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Receptors, Estrogen - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of genetic variants in the estrogen receptor beta gene to the aetiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Several lines of evidence from human and animal studies suggest a protective role for estrogen in PD. Recently the estrogen receptor beta subtype was reported to be an important mediator of estrogen actions in the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms at position 1730 and 1082 in the ER beta gene were genotyped, using pyrosequencing, in 260 patients with PD and 308 controls recruited from the Swedish population. Neither of the two estrogen receptor beta polymorphisms was associated with an increased risk for PD. However, the G allele of the A1730G polymorphism was more frequent in patients with an early age of onset than in patients with a late age of onset of PD (P = 0.006). Patients carrying the GG genotype had an odds ratio of 2.2 for having an early onset of PD compared to non-carriers. In conclusion, our results indicate that genetic variation in the estrogen receptor beta gene may influence the age of onset of PD.
PubMed ID
15219649 View in PubMed
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Associations between polysubstance use and psychiatric problems in a criminal justice population in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136032
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Oct 1;118(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
A. Hakansson
F. Schlyter
M. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Clinical Alcohol Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. anders_c.hakansson@med.lu.se
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Oct 1;118(1):5-11
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Criminal Law - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Polysubstance use is common in substance users, and may complicate their clinical course. This study, in a criminal justice setting in Sweden, examines the association between the number of concurrently used substance types and psychiatric symptoms during 30 days before incarceration, while controlling for background variables such as family history (drug and alcohol problems, psychiatric problems, criminality), demographic data and history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse.
The data material comprised 5659 criminal justice clients reporting a substance use problem, examined with the Addiction Severity Index. Variables were compared in a multinomial regression analysis, comparing clients reporting one (n=1877), two (n=1408), three (n=956), four (n=443) and five or more (n=167) substance types.
The 30-day prevalence of most psychiatric symptoms included in the study (depression, anxiety, cognitive problems, hallucinations, difficulty controlling violent behaviour, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts) was higher in individuals with a higher number of concurrent substance types used. In multinomial regression analysis, while controlling for background variables, these associations remained for concurrent suicidal ideation, cognitive problems, hallucinations and violent behaviour, with the latter two being associated with the higher numbers of substance types. Binge alcohol drinking, tranquilizers, opioids and the number of substance types reported were associated with several of the psychiatric symptoms.
In the present criminal justice setting in Sweden, the use of multiple substance types and concurrent psychiatric symptoms appear to be associated, and a sub-group reporting particularly high numbers of concurrent substance types are particularly likely to report potentially severe psychiatric problems.
PubMed ID
21419580 View in PubMed
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Common cancer-related symptoms among GP patients. Opportunistic screening in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19466
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Sep;19(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
L. Carlsson
A. Håkansson
B. Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Smedby Health Centre, Kalmar, Sweden. lasse.karlsson@previa.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Sep;19(3):199-203
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of symptoms related to the five most common forms of cancer among patients regularly visiting primary care. To estimate the proportion of symptoms needing GP examination, and the number of tumours thus diagnosed. DESIGN: Patients with some form of non-malignant chronic disease received a letter with information about cancer-related symptoms along with an invitation to regular check-up. The letter described the most common symptoms of breast, colorectal, lung, prostate and skin cancers. SETTING: 12 health centres in Kalmar County, Sweden. SUBJECTS: 5200 patients aged over 40 years. RESULTS: One patient in 13 reported cancer-related symptoms to the GP. Women reported more symptoms than men, and almost half of them had had symptoms at previous check-ups. The GP was able to explain 7 out of 10 patients' symptoms directly. When other symptoms were examined, 8 cancers were diagnosed as well as 6 pre-malignant tumours, corresponding to 3 tumour diagnoses per 1000 check-ups. CONCLUSION: While attending regular check-ups, patients may not report symptoms which cause anxiety and sometimes indicate serious diseases. It is possible to widen the perspective and link both primary and secondary prevention of certain cancers to the check-up.
PubMed ID
11697566 View in PubMed
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Comparison between the outcome of antenatal care led primarily by district physician or by obstetrician. A study on a defined population based on the Medical Birth Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65445
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1988;67(7):639-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
A. Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1988;67(7):639-44
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - manpower
Nurse Midwives
Obstetrics - manpower
Physicians, Family
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
Data from the Medical Birth Registry of the National Board of Health and Welfare for the years 1979-83 were studied. Comparison was made between women from one area, where the district midwife and the district physician were in charge of the antenatal care, and another area, where it was the district midwife and the obstetrician who were primarily responsible for the antenatal care. All births included in the analysis took place in the same maternity department, the numbers of births in the two areas being 3,861 and 3,041, respectively. The study was unable to reveal any difference in the outcome of pregnancy between the two areas. Thus, antenatal care led primarily by the district physician (referring complicated pregnancies to the obstetrician) seemed to be just as satisfactory as that led primarily by the obstetrician. A greater proportion of women in the latter group had 'abnormal' deliveries, for which there was no apparent cause.
PubMed ID
3247836 View in PubMed
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Cytochrome P450 2E1 gene polymorphisms/haplotypes and Parkinson's disease in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151422
Source
J Neural Transm. 2009 May;116(5):567-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
H Niazi Shahabi
L. Westberg
J. Melke
A. Håkansson
A Carmine Belin
O. Sydow
L. Olson
B. Holmberg
H. Nissbrandt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. haydeh.niazi@pharm.gu.se
Source
J Neural Transm. 2009 May;116(5):567-73
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Chromosome Mapping
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1 - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genotype
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - enzymology - genetics - physiopathology
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which inter alia is located in dopamine containing neurons in the substantia nigra, has been hypothesized to be of importance for the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), either by its production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by its capability to detoxify putative neurotoxins. Numerous polymorphisms in the coding and non-coding regions of the gene for this enzyme have been reported. Different variants may account for inter-individual differences in the activity of the enzyme or production of ROS. In this study, the CYP2E1 gene was examined in a control population (n = 272) and a population with PD (n = 347), using a tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) approach founded on HapMap Data. Six tSNPs were used in the analysis and haplotype block data were obtained. In case of significance, the SNP was further examined regarding early/late age of disease onset and presence of relatives with PD. We found an association between allele and genotype frequencies of the C/G polymorphism at intron 7 (rs2070676) of this gene and PD (P value of 0.026 and 0.027, respectively). Furthermore, analysis of the rs2070676 polymorphism in subgroups of patients with age of disease onset higher than 50 years and those not having a relative with PD also demonstrated a significant difference with controls. This was seen in both genotype (corresponding to P value = 0.039 and 0.032) and allele (P = 0.027 and 0.017 respectively) frequency. As a representative of many polymorphisms or in possible linkage disequilibrium with other functional variants, it is possible that rs2070676 could influence the regulation of the enzyme. In conclusion, our results display an association between the rs2070676 polymorphism and PD. Additional investigations are needed to elucidate the importance of this polymorphism for the activity of CYP2E1 and PD susceptibility.
PubMed ID
19381774 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.