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177 records – page 1 of 18.

A 10-year survey of inflammatory bowel diseases-drug therapy, costs and adverse reactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71979
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P. Blomqvist
N. Feltelius
R. Löfberg
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Paul.Blomqvist@mep.ki.se
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescriptions, Drug - economics
Retrospective Studies
Steroids
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Drug therapy for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is based on anti-inflammatory and immunodulating drugs, nutritional support and surgical resection. Recently, new drugs have been introduced. AIM: To report drug prescriptions, costs and adverse reactions among inflammatory bowel disease patients in Sweden between 1988 and 1997. METHODS: Drug use was calculated from the national Diagnosis and therapy survey and drug costs from prescriptions and drug sales. Adverse drug reactions were obtained from the Medical Products Agency's National Pharmacovigilance system. RESULTS: The annual drug exposure for Crohn's disease was 0.55 million daily doses per million population, mainly supplementation and aminosalicylic acids. Mesalazine and olsalazine had 61% within this group. For ulcerative colitis patients, drug exposure was 0.61 million daily doses per million per year and aminosalicylic acids fell from 70% to 65%. For inflammatory bowel disease patients, corticosteroids and nutritional supplementation were common. The annual average cost for inflammatory bowel disease drugs was 7.0 million US dollars. Annually, 32 adverse drug reactions were reported, mainly haematological reactions such as agranulocytosis and pancytopenia (60%), followed by skin reactions. Only two deaths were reported. Aminosalicylic acids were the most commonly reported compounds. CONCLUSIONS: Drug use for inflammatory bowel disease in the pre-biologic agent era rested on aminosalicylic acid drugs and corticosteroids with stable levels, proportions and costs. The level of adverse drug reactions was low but haematological reactions support the monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease patients.
PubMed ID
11284775 View in PubMed
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Acromegaly and cancer risk: a cohort study in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18975
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
D. Baris
G. Gridley
E. Ron
E. Weiderpass
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Ekbom
J H Olsen
J A Baron
J F Fraumeni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240, USA. barisd@mail.nih.gov
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - complications
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Growth Substances - blood
Humans
Incidence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms, especially of the colon. To further investigate this relationship we evaluated cancer risk in population-based cohorts of acromegaly patients in Sweden and Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide registry-based cohorts of patients hospitalized for acromegaly (Denmark 1977-1993; Sweden 1965-1993) were linked to tumor registry data for up to 15-28 years of follow-up, respectively. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate cancer risk among 1634 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS: The patterns of cancer risk in Sweden and Denmark were similar. After excluding the first year of follow-up, 177 patients with acromegaly had a diagnosis of cancer compared with an expected number of 116.5 (SIR = 1.5. 95% CI = 1.3-1.8). Increased risks were found for digestive system cancers (SIR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.62.7), notably of the small intestine (SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.2-17.4), colon (SIR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-3.8), and rectum (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI= 1.3-4.2). Risks were also elevated for cancers of the brain (SIR = 2.7, 95% CI= 1.2-5.0). thyroid (SIR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.8-10.9), kidney (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-5.5), and bone (SIR= 13.8, 95% CI= 1.7-50.0). CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk for several cancer sites among acromegaly patients may be due to the elevated proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity associated with increased circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Pituitary irradiation given to some patients may have contributed to the excess risks of brain tumors and thyroid cancer. Our findings indicate the need for close medical surveillance of patients with acromegaly, and further studies of the IGF-I system in the etiology of various cancers.
PubMed ID
12146843 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9936
Source
Gut. 2002 Aug;51(2):236-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
W. Ye
J. Lagergren
E. Weiderpass
O. Nyrén
H-O Adami
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. weiye@mbox.ki.se
Source
Gut. 2002 Aug;51(2):236-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pancreatitis - complications
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although most epidemiological studies do not support a role for alcohol in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer, an increased risk among heavy drinkers cannot be excluded. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort based on the Swedish Inpatient Register, we analysed the risk of pancreatic cancer among patients admitted to hospital for alcoholism (n=178 688), alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (n=3500), non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (n=4952), alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n=13 553), or non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n=7057) from 1965 to 1994. Follow up through to 1995 was accomplished by linkage to nationwide registers. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) express the relative risks by taking the general Swedish population as reference. To minimise the possible influence of selection bias, we excluded the first year observations. RESULTS: Alcoholics had only a modest 40% excess risk of pancreatic cancer (SIR 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.5). Overrepresented smokers among alcoholics might confound a true SIR of unity among alcoholics to approximately 1.4. SIR among alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients (2.2, 95% CI 0.9-4.5) was considerably lower than that among non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients (8.7, 95% CI 6.8-10.9), and decreased with increasing duration of follow up in both groups, indicating that most of the excess might be explained by reversed causation from undiagnosed cancers. Among patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, the increased risk of pancreatic cancer was also moderate (SIR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.8) while no significant excess risk was found among non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis patients (SIR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6-2.2). CONCLUSIONS: The excess risk for pancreatic cancer among alcoholics is small and could conceivably be attributed to confounding by smoking.
PubMed ID
12117886 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and breast cancer risk: the alcoholism paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
H. Kuper
W. Ye
E. Weiderpass
A. Ekbom
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based cohort study of 36 856 women diagnosed with alcoholism in Sweden between 1965 and 1995 found that alcoholic women had only a small 15% increase in breast-cancer incidence compared to the general female population. It is therefore apparent, contrary to expectation, that alcoholism does not increase breast-cancer risk in proportion to presumed ethanol intake.
PubMed ID
10970699 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and cancer risk: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24357
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
H O Adami
J K McLaughlin
A W Hsing
A. Wolk
A. Ekbom
L. Holmberg
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of cancer was studied in a population-based cohort of 9,353 individuals (8,340 men and 1,013 women) with a discharge diagnosis of alcoholism in 1965-83, followed up for 19 years (mean 7.7). After exclusion of cancers in the first year of follow-up, 491 cancers were observed cf 343.2 expected through 1984 (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 1.4, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-1.6). A similar excess risk of cancer was seen among men (SIR = 1.4, CI = 1.3-1.6) and among women (SIR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.0). We observed the established associations with cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (SIR = 4.1, CI = 2.9-5.7), esophagus (SIR = 6.8, CI = 4.5-9.9), larynx (SIR = 3.3, CI = 1.7-6.0), and lung (SIR = 2.1, CI = 1.7-2.6), although confounding by smoking likely increased these risk estimates. While there was evidence of increased risk for pancreatic cancer (SIR = 1.5, CI = 0.9-2.3), alcoholism did not elevate the incidence of cancer of the stomach (SIR = 0.9, CI = 6-1.4), large bowel (SIR = 1.1, CI = 0.8-1.5), prostate (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.8-1.3), urinary bladder (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.6-1.5), or of malignant melanoma (SIR = 0.9, CI = 0.3-1.9). Among women, the number of breast cancers observed was close to expected (SIR = 1.2, CI = 0.6-2.2), although a significant excess number of cervical cancers occurred (SIR = 4.2, CI = 1.5-9.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1525322 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and liver cirrhosis in the etiology of primary liver cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11847
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1992
Author
H O Adami
A W Hsing
J K McLaughlin
D. Trichopoulos
D. Hacker
A. Ekbom
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Date
Jul-30-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the risk of developing primary liver cancer in patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, or both. Three population-based, mutually exclusive cohorts were defined on the basis of hospital discharge diagnosis between 1965 and 1983. Complete follow-up through 1984--excluding the first year of follow-up--showed that among 8,517 patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, 13 cancers occurred, vs. 4.2 expected (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6 to 5.3); among 3,589 patients with liver cirrhosis, 59 cancers occurred, vs. 1.7 expected (SIR = 35.1; 95% CI = 26.7 to 45.3), and among 836 patients with both diagnoses, 11 cancers occurred, vs. 0.3 expected (SIR = 34.3; 95% CI = 17.1 to 61.3). Thus, alcoholism alone entailed a moderately increased risk and alcoholism with liver cirrhosis did not increase the high relative risk for liver cancer more than cirrhosis alone. We conclude that alcohol intake may be a liver carcinogen only by being causally involved in the development of cirrhosis; and further, that the risk of developing liver cancer following cirrhosis in this population is similar to or higher than that after chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection in other Western countries.
PubMed ID
1639537 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
B. Lindelöf
F. Granath
M. Tengvall-Linder
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1116-20
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Immune Tolerance - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Conflicting results have provided support for two distinct and contradictory hypotheses: (i) allergy has a protective effect against cancer by enhanced immune surveillance, and (ii) allergy is associated with an increased risk of cancer by chronic immune stimulation. We therefore aimed us to perform a large epidemiological study with a defined allergic disease cohort. METHODS: During the years 1988-2000, 70 136 patients tested for total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and 57 815 tested with Phadiatop for diagnosing allergic disease at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, were linked with the Swedish Cancer Registry for a virtually complete follow up with regard to cancer. FINDINGS: The total number of observed cancers was normal in the total serum IgE-cohort; standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 0.98 (95% CI: 0.92-1.04) and in the Phadiatop-cohort: SIR = 0.99 (0.92-1.06) independent of the level of IgE and positive or negative Phadiatop. Specific analysis was done for cancer of the lung, cervix, pancreas, lymphoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. None of these forms of cancer had increased risks. INTERPRETATION: The study does not support the hypothesis that allergy has a protective effect against cancer, nor does it support an increased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Allergy. 2005 Sep;60(9):1095-716076291
PubMed ID
16076294 View in PubMed
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[An early Swedish description of restless legs (Huss 1849)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253259
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Aug 7;71(32):2905-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-1974

Anorexia nervosa in males: excess mortality and psychiatric co-morbidity in 609 Swedish in-patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290261
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Jun; 47(8):1489-1499
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
J Kask
M Ramklint
N Kolia
D Panagiotakos
A Ekbom
L Ekselius
F C Papadopoulos
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry,University Hospital, Uppsala University,Uppsala,Sweden.
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Jun; 47(8):1489-1499
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Comorbidity
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder with high mortality.
A retrospective register study of 609 males who received hospitalized care for AN in Sweden between 1973 and 2010 was performed. The standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and Cox regression-derived hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated as measures of mortality. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated to compare the mortality rates in patients with AN and controls both with and without psychiatric diagnoses.
The SMR for all causes of death was 4.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-5.3]. For those patients with psychiatric co-morbidities, the SMR for all causes of death was 9.1 (95% CI 6.6-12.2), and for those without psychiatric co-morbidity, the SMR was 1.6 (95% CI 0.9-2.7). For the group of patients with alcohol use disorder, the SMR for natural causes of death was 11.5 (95% CI 5.0-22.7), and that for unnatural causes was 35.5 (95% CI 17.7-63.5). The HRs confirmed the increased mortality for AN patients with psychiatric co-morbidities, even after adjusting for confounders. The IRRs revealed no significant difference in mortality patterns between the AN patients with psychiatric co-morbidity and the controls with psychiatric diagnoses, with the exceptions of alcohol use disorder and neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders, which seemed to confer a negative synergistic effect on mortality.
Mortality in male AN patients was significantly elevated compared with the general population among only the patients with psychiatric co-morbidities. Specifically, the presence of alcohol and other substance use disorders was associated with more profound excess mortality.
PubMed ID
28162109 View in PubMed
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Anti-TNF treatment in Crohn's disease and risk of bowel resection-a population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287628
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2017 09;46(6):589-598
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2017
Author
M. Eberhardson
J K Söderling
M. Neovius
T. Cars
P. Myrelid
J F Ludvigsson
J. Askling
A. Ekbom
O. Olén
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2017 09;46(6):589-598
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adalimumab - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Crohn Disease - drug therapy
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infliximab - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have been shown to reduce the need for surgery in Crohn's disease, but few studies have examined their effect beyond the first year of treatment.
To conduct a register-based observational cohort study in Sweden 2006-2014 to investigate the risk of bowel resection in bowel surgery naïve TNFi-treated Crohn's disease patients and whether patients on TNFi =12 months are less likely to undergo bowel resection than patients discontinuing treatment before 12 months.
We identified all individuals in Sweden with Crohn's disease through the Swedish National Patient Register 1987-2014 and evaluated the incidence of bowel resection after first ever dispensation of adalimumab or infliximab from 2006 and up to 7 years follow-up.
We identified 1856 Crohn's disease patients who had received TNFi. Among these patients, 90% treatment retention was observed at 6 months after start of TNFi and 65% remained on the drug after 12 months. The cumulative rates of surgery in Crohn's disease patients exposed to TNFi years 1-7 were 7%, 13%, 17%, 20%, 23%, 25% and 28%. Rates of bowel resection were similar between patients with TNFi survival
Notes
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2018 Jan;47(1):146-14729226397
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2018 Jan;47(1):147-14829226402
PubMed ID
28752637 View in PubMed
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177 records – page 1 of 18.