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35 records – page 1 of 4.

Adrenaline in out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation. Does it make any difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11388
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Emergencies
Emergency medical services
Epinephrine - therapeutic use
Female
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cardiac arrests outside hospital are caused by ventricular fibrillation. Although it is frequently used, the exact role of treatment with adrenaline in these patients remains to be determined. AIM: To describe the proportion of patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation who survived and were discharged from hospital in relation to whether they were treated with adrenaline prior to hospital admission. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT: All the patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation in Göteborg between 1981 and 1992 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated by our emergency medical service (EMS). During the observation period, some of the EMS staff were authorized to give medication and some were not. RESULTS: In all, 1360 patients were found in ventricular fibrillation and detailed information was available in 1203 cases (88%). Adrenaline was given in 417 cases (35%). Among patients with sustained ventricular fibrillation, those who received adrenaline experienced the return of spontaneous circulation more frequently (P
PubMed ID
7667549 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
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Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation out-of-hospital. A first description of the bystanders and their experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7779
Source
Resuscitation. 1996 Nov;33(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
A. Axelsson
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1996 Nov;33(1):3-11
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - psychology
Female
First Aid - psychology
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
At present there are about 1 million trained cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rescuers in Sweden. CPR out-of-hospital is initiated about 2000 times a year in Sweden. However, very little is known about the bystanders' experiences and reactions. The aim of this study was to describe bystander-initiated CPR, the circumstances, the bystander and his experiences. All CPR bystanders in Sweden who reported their resuscitation attempts between 1990 and 1994 were approached with a phone interview and a postal questionnaire, resulting in 742 questionnaires. Bystander-initiated CPR most frequently took place in public places such as the street. The rescuer most frequently had problems with mouth-to-mouth ventilation (20%) and vomiting (18%). More than half (53%) of the rescuers experienced CPR without problems. Ninety-two percent of the bystanders had no hesitation because of fear of contracting the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. Ninety-three percent of the rescuers regarded their intervention as a mainly positive experience. Of 425 interviewed rescuers, 99.5% were prepared to start CPR again.
PubMed ID
8959767 View in PubMed
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[Care of out-patients with ear, nose and throat diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76002
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Apr 24;71(17):1735-6 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1974

Continuation of CPR on admission to emergency department after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Occurrence, characteristics and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34511
Source
Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):223-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
B. Wennerblom
L. Waagstein
M. Dellborg
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):223-31
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Countershock
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - diagnosis
Abstract
AIM: To describe the occurrence, characteristics and outcome among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who required continuation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on admission to the emergency department. PATIENTS: all patients in the municipality of Göteborg who suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, were reached by the emergency medical service (EMS) system and in whom CPR was initiated. Period for inclusion in study: 1 Oct. 1980-31 Dec. 1992. RESULTS: of 334 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, 2,319 (68%) were receiving on-going CPR at the time of admission to hospital. Of these, 137 patients (6%) were hospitalized alive and 28 (1.2%) could be discharged from hospital. Of these patients, 39% had a cerebral performance categories (CPC) score of 1 (no cerebral deficiency), 18% had a CPC score of 2 (moderate cerebral deficiency), 36% had a CPC score of 3 (severe cerebral deficiency) and 7% had a CPC score of 4 (coma) at discharge. Among patients discharged. 76% were alive after 1 year. CONCLUSION: among consecutive patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, CPR was ongoing in 68% of them on admission to hospital. Among these patients, 6% were hospitalized alive and 1.2% were discharged from hospital. Thus, among patients with ongoing CPR on admission to hospital, survivors can be found but they are few in numbers and extensive cerebral damage is frequently present.
Notes
Comment In: Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):197-89044489
PubMed ID
9044495 View in PubMed
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[Early outcome in diabetic patients following coronary artery bypass grafting].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262416
Source
Laeknabladid. 2014 Oct;100(10):507-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Jónas A Adalsteinsson
Tomas A Axelsson
Daði Helgason
Linda O Arnadottir
Hera Johannesdottir
Arnar Geirsson
Karl Andersen
Tomas Gudbjartsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2014 Oct;100(10):507-12
Date
Oct-2014
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Diabetic Angiopathies - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Female
Humans
Iceland
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Diabetes is one of the most important risk factors for coronary artery disease. Diabetics often have severe three vessel disease and coronary bypass surgery is in most cases the preferred treatment of choice in these patients. We investigated early surgical complications and outcomes in diabetic patients following isolated CABG in Iceland and compared them to those of non-diabetic patients.
A retrospective study of 1626 consecutive CABG patients operated in Iceland 2001-2012. Diabetic patients were 261 (16%) and were compared to 1365 non-diabetics in terms of patient demographics, operative data, and postoperative outcomes. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for major complications and 30-day mortality.
The groups were similar in terms of age, gender and Euro-SCORE. Diabetic patients had a higher BMI (30 vs. 28 kg/m(2), p
PubMed ID
25310039 View in PubMed
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Effect of bystander initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ventricular fibrillation and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54852
Source
Br Heart J. 1994 Nov;72(5):408-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Br Heart J. 1994 Nov;72(5):408-12
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Brain Ischemia - prevention & control
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - mortality
Comparative Study
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To describe the proportion of patients who were discharged from hospital after witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital in relation to whether a bystander initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PATIENTS--All patients with witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital before arrival of the ambulance and in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted by the emergency medical service in Gothenburg during 1980-92. RESULTS--Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated by a bystander in 18% (303) of 1,660 cases. In this group 69% had ventricular fibrillation at first recording compared with 51% in the remaining patients (P
PubMed ID
7818956 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis: a nationwide population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124644
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jul;24(7):824-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Theodora R Baldursdottir
Ottar M Bergmann
Jon G Jonasson
Björn R Ludviksson
Tomas A Axelsson
Einar S Björnsson
Author Affiliation
Department of aGastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital of Iceland, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jul;24(7):824-30
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholagogues and Choleretics - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Liver Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Ursodeoxycholic Acid - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Very few population-based studies exist on the epidemiology of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and none have been conducted in the last decade. We aimed to determine the epidemiology and prognosis of PBC over the past two decades.
Patients were identified by multiple case finding strategies, covering the total population of Iceland. A search was conducted in the centralized database of antimitochondrial antibody (AMA) measurements and computerized diagnosis and pathological registries. All AMA measurements taken in Iceland between 1991 and 2010 were analyzed. Relevant clinical information was gathered from medical records, pathology reports, and death certificates. Incidence was compared between two periods, 1991-2000 versus 2001-2010.
A total of 168 patients were identified, of which 138 were female (82%), with a median age 62 years (range 13-92). Prevalence at the end of the study period was 38.3 cases per 100 000 person-years. Age-standardized incidence for female patients during the first period was 3.4 versus 4.1 during the second (NS) and that for male patients was 0.6 during the first period versus 1.0 per 100 000 during the second (NS). Overall incidence in the first period was 2.0 and that in the second was 2.5 per 100 000 (NS). Stage III-IV liver fibrosis was present in 28% of patients at diagnosis with no significant differences between the two decades. Median survival after diagnosis was 15 years. Five patients underwent liver transplantation.
The incidence and prevalence figures of PBC in Iceland are among the highest reported and have been stable over the last two decades. The prognosis of patients in this population-based cohort is better than that previously reported.
PubMed ID
22562114 View in PubMed
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Favourable long-term outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting in a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287627
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Dec;51(6):327-333
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Hera Johannesdottir
Linda O Arnadottir
Jonas A Adalsteinsson
Tomas A Axelsson
Martin I Sigurdsson
Solveig Helgadottir
Dadi Helgason
Helga R Gardarsdottir
Steinthor A Marteinsson
Arnar Geirsson
Gudmundur Thorgeirsson
Tomas Gudbjartsson
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Dec;51(6):327-333
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - mortality - surgery
Female
Humans
Iceland
Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis - adverse effects - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Retreatment
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Saphenous Vein - transplantation
Stroke - etiology
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In a nationwide cohort, we analyzed long-term outcome following coronary artery bypass grafting, using the combined strategy of left internal mammary artery to the left anterior descending artery and saphenous vein as secondary graft to other coronary targets.
1,507 consecutive patients that underwent myocardial revascularization during 2001-2012 in Iceland. Mean follow-up was 6.8 years. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events were depicted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox-regression was used to define risk factors. Relative survival was estimated by comparing overall survival to the survival of Icelanders of the same age and gender.
Mean age was 66 years, 83% were males, mean EuroSCOREst was 4.5, and 23% of the procedures were performed off-pump. At 5 years, 19.7% had suffered a major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular event, 4.5% a stroke, 2.2% myocardial infarction, and 6.2% needed repeat revascularization. Overall 5-year survival was 89.9%, with a relative survival of 0.990. Independent predictors of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events were left ventricular ejection fraction =30%, a previous history of percutaneous coronary intervention, chronic obstructive lung disease, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and old age. The same variables and an earlier year of operation were predictors of long-term mortality.
The long-term outcome following myocardial revascularization, using the left internal mammary artery and the great saphenous vein as conduits, is favourable and improving. This is reflected by the 5-year survival of 89.9%, deviating minimally from the survival rate of the general Icelandic population, together with a freedom from major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events of 80.3%.
PubMed ID
28805102 View in PubMed
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[Firecrackers--a risk of hearing injuries?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38891
Source
Lakartidningen. 1987 Apr 15;84(16):1341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1987

35 records – page 1 of 4.