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ABH secretion polymorphism in Icelanders, Aland Islanders, Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi and Greenland Eskimos: a review and new data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237022
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Publication Type
Article
Author
A W Eriksson
K. Partanen
R R Frants
J C Pronk
P J Kostense
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland
Greenland
Humans
Iceland
Inuits
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Saliva - immunology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The secretion of the ABH antigens in saliva was tested in indigenous individuals of several populations: Icelanders in Reykjavik and Husavik (northeastern Iceland), Aland Islanders, Finno-Ugrians (Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi) and Eskimos (Augpilagtok, northwestern Greenland). The frequencies of ABH non-secretors among the Icelanders (28-36%) were among the highest ever noted in Europeans. Among Alanders and Swedes on the Finnish mainland the frequency (around 20%) was comparable to Swedish values but considerably higher than among Finns (13-14%). The values among northeastern Finns and Komi (about 9%) were intermediate between values among Lapps (below 5%) and Scandinavians (15-26%), excluding Icelanders (28-41%). The average frequency of non-secretors among Lapps in Finland (2.2 +/- 0.5%) was the lowest observed among white populations. Like many other arctic populations of the Mongolian race, the Greenland Eskimos had a very low frequency of non-secretors. It is probable that the non-secretor allele ABH*se was absent from the ancient Lapps and Greenland Eskimos but introduced by invading populations. It is concluded that the ABH*se allele frequencies vary much more among northern European populations than hitherto appreciated. Recent studies indicate that the non-secretor status of the ABH blood group substances in mucous body fluids is associated with pathological conditions of the mucous membranes of the embryologically related digestive and respiratory systems, particularly with duodenal ulcer and gastric (pre)malignancies but probably also with pulmonary dysfunction. In view of these disadvantages of the ABH non-secretor status the high frequency of ABH*se in Icelanders is a paradoxical phenomenon. The frequency of ABH non-secretors among the founders (Vikings) of Iceland may have been considerably higher than among the present populations in northwestern Europe. The increase in northwestern direction of the ABH*se allele frequencies supports this hypothesis; the dilution effect has not been as strong in Iceland as on the European continent.
PubMed ID
3752918 View in PubMed
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Alpha 1-antitrypsin and acute anterior uveitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245024
Source
Albrecht Von Graefes Arch Klin Exp Ophthalmol. 1981;216(3):205-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
K M Saari
J. Solja
M. Sirpelä
R R Frants
A W Eriksson
Source
Albrecht Von Graefes Arch Klin Exp Ophthalmol. 1981;216(3):205-7
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Humans
Isoelectric Focusing
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Protease Inhibitors - metabolism
Uveitis - enzymology - genetics - metabolism
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
To test the pathogenetic role of the phenotype MZ of alpha 1-antitrypsin/alpha 1-protease inhibitor (PI) in acute anterior uveitis (AAU), 156 patients with AAU were examined. Sera of all patients and 120 healthy controls were PI-typed using isoelectric focusing. There were no significant differences in PI MZ frequencies either between the patients with AAU (4.5%) and the controls (4.2%), or between AAU patients with associated rheumatic diseases (4.8%) and AAU patients with no associated disease (4.3%). The results indicate that the PI MZ type is not closely associated with AAU among Finns.
PubMed ID
6972712 View in PubMed
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Autosomal recessive cornea plana. A clinical and genetic study of 78 cases in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205654
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Apr;76(2):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
H. Forsius
M. Damsten
A W Eriksson
J. Fellman
S. Lindh
E. Tahvanainen
Author Affiliation
The Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Apr;76(2):196-203
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12
Cornea - abnormalities - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
To review the literature of autosomal recessive cornea plana (RCP) and to perform a clinical and genetic study on this disorder in Finland. The 78 Finnish RCP patients represent the majority of RCP cases worldwide; outside Finland only 35 cases have been reported.
Families with RCP, particularly in northern Finland, have been followed up by the senior author since the 1950s and extensive genealogical studies have been made.
The most typical symptoms are greatly reduced corneal refraction, 25-35 dioptres, causing strong hyperopia, slight microcornea, an extended limbus zone, a central, deep corneal opacity and a marked arcus senilis, seen even before the age of 20. We present a pedigree comprising 33 affected persons with cornea plana. We have mapped the two genes for the dominantly and the recessively inherited type of cornea plana to the same region on the long arm of chromosome 12, (12q21).
In northern Finland RCP has a higher frequency than elsewhere, probably as a result of a strong founder effect in the population that arrived in these regions approx. 400 years ago. The strong accumulation of this rare disease in these isolated areas and the strong genealogical connections between different families with RCP, suggest that probably all the Finnish RCP cases are caused by the same mutation.
PubMed ID
9591953 View in PubMed
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Autosomal recessive Sorsby fundus dystrophy revisited: molecular evidence for dominant inheritance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210309
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1997 Jan;60(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
U. Felbor
E A Suvanto
H R Forsius
A W Eriksson
B H Weber
Author Affiliation
Institut für Humangenetik, Universität Würzburg, Germany.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1997 Jan;60(1):57-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Consanguinity
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fundus Oculi
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Haplotypes
Humans
Macular Degeneration - genetics
Male
Pedigree
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Proteins - genetics
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3
Abstract
Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) originally was characterized as an autosomal dominant disorder in which patients lose central vision during the 4th or 5th decade of life. Since Sorsby's initial description, interfamilial phenotypic variations have been noted and have given rise to controversy as to whether SFD constitutes more than one nosologic entity. In addition, several reports have proposed the existence of a recessively inherited form of SFD. The recent identification of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP3) as the disease-causing gene in SFD has made it possible to address the questions of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we reinvestigated a large, highly consanguineous Finnish family previously diagnosed as having early-onset autosomal recessive SFD. We identified a novel heterozygous Gly166Cys mutation in TIMP3 in all affected individuals and provide strong evidence for an autosomal dominant inheritance of the SFD phenotype in this family. Our results, in conjunction with a critical review of the reported cases, render the existence of a recessive mode of inheritance in SFD questionable. Considering all available data, we suggest that SFD is a genetically homogeneous, autosomal dominant condition.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Dec;65(12):859-657317334
Cites: Am J Ophthalmol. 1982 Nov;94(5):634-497148944
Cites: Eye (Lond). 1988;2 ( Pt 1):114-222457521
Cites: Genomics. 1989 Nov;5(4):874-92687159
Cites: Ophthalmology. 1989 Dec;96(12):1763-82622621
Cites: Clin Genet. 1990 Jul;38(1):21-322387082
Cites: Nat Genet. 1994 Jun;7(2 Spec No):246-3397545953
Cites: Nat Genet. 1994 Dec;8(4):352-67894485
Cites: J Med Genet. 1995 Mar;32(3):240-17783180
Cites: Nat Genet. 1995 Sep;11(1):27-327550309
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 1995 Dec;4(12):2415-68634721
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1996 Jun;114(6):737-88639088
Cites: J Med Genet. 1996 Mar;33(3):233-68728699
Cites: Retina. 1995;15(6):480-58747441
Cites: Genome Res. 1995 Dec;5(5):483-78808469
Cites: Genome Res. 1996 Feb;6(2):92-1018919688
PubMed ID
8981947 View in PubMed
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Biometric analysis of the multiple maternities in Finland, 1881-1990, and in Sweden since 1751.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64820
Source
Hum Biol. 1993 Jun;65(3):463-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
J O Fellman
A W Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Population Genetics Unit, Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Hum Biol. 1993 Jun;65(3):463-79
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Rate - trends
Comparative Study
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Maternal Age
Sweden
Triplets - statistics & numerical data
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hellin's law states that if the twinning rate is w, then the triplet rate is w2, the quadruplet rate is w3, and so forth. The opinion of today is that Hellin's law holds only approximately. In this study the inaccuracy of Hellin's law is studied and the discrepancies are explained mathematically. In our earlier studies we built linear models for the twinning rate. Because most of the mothers are younger than 40 years of age and because in this age interval the twinning rate depends linearly on age, linear regression methods have been applied. Hellin's law suggests using the square-root transformation of the triplet rate r. Statistical arguments speak in favor of using the arcsin square root of r transformation. We discuss both transformations. Despite the fact that Hellin's law is only approximate, the arcsin transformation proves valuable. The transformed triplet rate can be modeled in a way similar to the twinning rate. We consider secular data from Finland for 1881-1990 and from Sweden since 1751. Using Hellin's law, we compare the triplet rates and the twinning rates and study the time trends of the observed twinning and triplet rates. The data are standardized. Our theoretical results are applied to multiple maternity data for Finland. Using maternal age as the regressor, we build a linear model for the twinning rate and for the arcsin-transformed triplet rate. This analysis shows a decreasing linear time trend in the triplet series for the period 1881-1950 but not in the twinning series. The triplet rate has an increasing trend after 1960, which seems to be mainly caused by artificial induction of ovulation.
PubMed ID
8319944 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure in adult Lapps and Skolts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252511
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1975 Feb;7(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
S. Sundberg
P. Luukka
K L Andersen
A W Eriksson
P. Siltanen
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1975 Feb;7(1):17-22
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood pressure
Climate
Continental Population Groups
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
Casual blood pressures were recorded in 331 Lapps and 221 Skolts over the age of 20. The systolic pressure was found to rise more with age in women than in men. In neither sex did age affect the diastolic pressure. A general tendency towards higher blood pressure in Lapps than in Skolts was noted up to the age of 50-60 years. Comparison with a Finnish population and one from the Aland Islands revealed similar systolic blood pressures in females, but definitely lower values in male Lapps and Skolts. The Lapps and Skolts did not have the clear age dependence of the diastolic blood pressure as occurs in Finns. These findings, together with other population studies, support the hypothesis that the setting of the resting blood pressure level is influenced by different kinds of stress associated with technological development and with an urbanized way of life.
PubMed ID
1155907 View in PubMed
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Colour blindness in Finland. 1. Frequency of protans and deutans. 2. Family studies on minor deviations of the normal mid matching point using the anomalscope.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110901
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1968;46(3):542-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

60 records – page 1 of 6.