Skip header and navigation

Refine By

84 records – page 1 of 9.

Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 83
Publication Type
Article

Alaska Native cancer update: incidence rates 1989-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4041
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
A P Lanier
J J Kelly
B. Smith
A P Harpster
H. Tanttila
C. Amadon
D. Beckworth
C. Key
A M Davidson
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, United States Public Health Service, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
SEER Program
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Five-year average annual age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for Alaska Natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts) for the most recent period (1989-1993) are compared to rates of 20 years earlier. Rates for all cancers combined increased 28 and 25% in men and women, respectively, during the 25-year interval. Increases were seen in men in cancers of the lung, prostate, and colon and in women for cancers of the lung, breast, and corpus uteri. Rates are also compared to data from the the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program for United States whites. Rates for all cancers combined in Alaska Native women are now similar to those of United States whites, whereas rates in Alaska Native men are lower than the United States, but only 10% lower. Significant site-specific differences previously reported between Alaska Natives and United States whites persist.
PubMed ID
8877067 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of Epstein-Barr virus with nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Alaskan native patients: serum antibodies and tissue EBNA and DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4247
Source
Int J Cancer. 1981 Sep 15;28(3):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1981
Author
A P Lanier
G W Bornkamm
W. Henle
G. Henle
T R Bender
M L Talbot
P H Dohan
Source
Int J Cancer. 1981 Sep 15;28(3):301-5
Date
Sep-15-1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
DNA, Viral - analysis
Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigens
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - immunology - microbiology
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - analysis
Abstract
Biopsy specimens from Alaskan Native patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and from other patients seen on the otolaryngology service were tested for Epstein-Barr virus-specific DNA and nuclear antigen (EBNA). Serum samples from both groups were tested for various EBV-related antibodies. EBV DNA and EBNA results were in agreement in 29 of 31 tissue specimens tested by the two methods. Ten of 11 biopsies containing NPC cells were positive for EBV DNA. Two NPC patients had biopsies that showed only atypical epithelium but were also positive for EBV DNA or EBNA. The other tissue specimens were negative except for biopsies from two patients: one with a parotid gland lymphoepithelial lesion; another with undifferentiated carcinoma of salivary gland origin.
PubMed ID
6274814 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer among Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. Introduction and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4065
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
N. Christensen
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cancer incidence data for Circumpolar Inuit populations were developed and compiled from Greenland, Canada and Alaska from 1969 to 1988 to provide the largest possible base of data for documenting the unusual patterns of cancer previously reported for these populations. Cancer incidence and population data were transferred to the Danish Cancer Registry. Coded information from various ICD-classifications and codes for the basis of diagnosis were transformed to one format, enabling joint analysis. Standard descriptive analysis was carried out with presentation of number of cases, crude incidence rates (CR), age-standardized rates (world) (ASR), cumulative rates to age 64 years, and indirectly standardized ratios (SIR) to the populations of Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark. The resulting database can be used to support collaborative international research among the Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813060 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer in Alaskan Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4253
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1980 Nov;65(5):1157-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
A P Lanier
W J Blot
T R Bender
J F Fraumeni
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1980 Nov;65(5):1157-9
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Carcinoma of the gallbladder
Carcinoma of the salivary gland
Carcinoma of the kidney
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Abstract
Standard incidence ratios for cancers that occurred during 1969--73 among Alaskan Natives (Indians and Eskimo-Aleuts) were reported. Although data suggested that the overall rate of cancer in this population was close to that of U.S. whites, differences existed for certain cancer sites. Thus increased risks in Alaskan Natives were observed for nasopharyngeal, salivary gland, kidney, and gallbladder and liver cancers. Conversely, decreased risks were found for cancers of the lung, larynx, bladder, prostate gland, breast, and corpus uterus and for melanoma and lymphoma.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2158.
PubMed ID
6933247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer in Alaskan Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts, 1969-83: implications for etiology and control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4158
Source
Public Health Reports. 1989 Nov-Dec;104(6):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A P Lanier
L R Bulkow
B. Ireland
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Laboratory, Center for Infectious Disease, Anchorage, AK 99501.
Source
Public Health Reports. 1989 Nov-Dec;104(6):658-64
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Comparative Study
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Inuits
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
NPC
PHC
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The authors collected and analyzed cancer incidence data for Alaska Natives (Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts) for the 15-year period 1969-83 by ethnic and linguistic groups. Compared with U.S. whites, observed-to-expected ratios are high in more than one ethnic group for cancer of the nasopharynx, salivary gland, liver, gallbladder, and cervix. Low ratios were found for cancer of the breast, uterus, bladder, and melanoma. In Alaska, Eskimos have the highest risk for cancer of the esophagus and liver and the lowest risk for breast and prostate cancer. Risk for multiple myeloma in Indian men in Alaska exceeds not only those of other Native groups in Alaska but that in U.S. whites as well. Despite the short period studied, increases in cancer incidence over time can be documented for lung cancer in Eskimo men and women combined, and for cervical cancer, especially in Indian women.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2156.
PubMed ID
2511602 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
National Cancer Institute Monograph. 1982;62:79-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A P Lanier
T R Bender
W J Blot
J F Fraumeni
Source
National Cancer Institute Monograph. 1982;62:79-81
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Carcinoma of the gallbladder
Carcinoma of the cervix
Carcinoma of the kidney
EBV
Female
HBV
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Abstract
Preliminary results of a cancer incidence survey among Alaskan Natives, 1974-78, indicated that patterns continue to differ from those of U.S. whites. Significantly high risks were found for cancers of the nasopharynx and liver in men, and cancers of the nasopharynx, gallbladder, cervix, and kidney in women. In men, significantly low risks were found for cancers of the prostate and bladder, leukemia, and lymphoma, and in women for cancers of the breast and uterus (excluding cervix), and lymphoma. Results are also given separately for Eskimo-Aleuts and Indians. Compared with Indians, Eskimo-Aleuts had higher risks for nasopharyngeal and liver cancers and lower risks for prostate and breast cancers.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2159.
PubMed ID
7167198 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer in Alaskan natives: a 15-year summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4200
Source
Alaska Med. 1986 Apr-Jun;28(2):37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
A P Lanier
L R Knutson
Source
Alaska Med. 1986 Apr-Jun;28(2):37-41
Date
1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
3489420 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
International Journal of Cancer. 1976 Oct 15;18(4):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1976
Author
A P Lanier
T R Bender
W J Blot
J F Fraumeni
W B Hurlburt
Source
International Journal of Cancer. 1976 Oct 15;18(4):409-12
Date
Oct-15-1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Inuits
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Prostate Neoplasms - epidemiology
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
United States
Abstract
A survey of cancer incidence among Alaska Natives for the 5-year period 1969-73 revealed fewer cancer cases overall than expected in relation to US rates, but significantly increased risk for certain cancer sites: the nasopharynx in both sexes (with excesses over 15-fold), the liver in males, and the salivary glands, gallbladder, kidney and thyroid in females. Compared with earlier reports, the observations suggest marked changes in cancer incidence among Alaska Natives over the past two decades, with declines in esophageal and invasive cervical cancers, and increases in cancers of the lung, colon and rectum.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2157.
PubMed ID
977187 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence in Alaska Natives thirty-year report 1969-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3467
Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Oct-Dec;43(4):87-115
Publication Type
Report
Author
A P Lanier
J J Kelly
P Holck
B. Smith
T. McEvoy
J. Sandidge
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Office of Community Health Services, 4201 Tudor Centre Drive, Suite 315, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Oct-Dec;43(4):87-115
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Alaska - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Relative survival
Mortality rates
Age
Cancer
Abstract
The Alaska Native Tumor Registry includes data from 1969 to the present. This report provides incidence rates over the thirty year period, 1969 through 1998, and compares trends over time for Alaska Natives (AN) with those of US Whites and Blacks. To examine current rates, average annual age-adjusted incidence rates for AN for 1984-98 are compared with US Whites. Data from the registry document numerous differences in rates of occurrence of specific cancers compared to US Whites and Blacks. Studies of these differences may provide clues to the causes and risk factors for the cancers. Most importantly, these data show that although cancer was considered a rare disease in the Alaska Native population as recently as the mid-twentieth century, the incidence rate for all cancers combined among Alaska Natives is now as high as that of US Whites, and even higher in women. On the other hand, despite relative differences in rates, the most frequently diagnosed cancers among Alaska Natives are the same as US Whites. Cancers of the lung, colon/rectum, breast, and prostate are most frequently diagnosed among Alaska Natives and in the U.S. These four cancers comprise over 50% of all diagnosed invasive cancers. Cancer of the lung is almost entirely preventable by eradication of tobacco use. Screening and early detection have been proven to reduce mortality for cancers of the colon/rectum and breast. Primary and secondary prevention of these cancers could markedly improve morbidity and mortality.
Notes
ALASKA RC282.A45C3 2001
PubMed ID
11878206 View in PubMed
Less detail

84 records – page 1 of 9.