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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Apolipoprotein E phenotype determines the effect of alcohol on blood pressure in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10774
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1998 Nov;11(11 Pt 1):1334-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
H. Kauma
M J Savolainen
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
K. Kervinen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland. heikki.kauma@oulu.fi
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1998 Nov;11(11 Pt 1):1334-43
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Apolipoprotein E (apoE) has an essential role in lipoprotein metabolism, but recent studies have also revealed other functions associated with it, eg, neurologic and malignant diseases. We studied the association between apoE phenotypes E2/3, E3/3, and E4/3 and blood pressure after adjustment for covariates, as well as the association between phenotypes and adjusted plasma glucose and insulin levels in the standard oral glucose tolerance test in a random middle-aged population-based cohort of 259 men and 267 women. Systolic blood pressure was associated with apoE phenotype in the men with moderate or heavy alcohol consumption (>115 g/week), the mean systolic blood pressure value being 16 mm Hg higher in the E2/3 and 11 mm Hg higher in the E3/3 phenotypes than in the E4/3 phenotype, P = .04. No association was seen in occasional drinkers or teetotalers (lowest tertile
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 1999 Sep;12(9 Pt 1):946-710509555
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 1999 Sep;12(9 Pt 1):949-5010509558
PubMed ID
9832177 View in PubMed
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Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism and carotid atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52730
Source
J Hypertens. 1996 Oct;14(10):1183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
H. Kauma
M. Päivänsalo
M J Savolainen
A O Rantala
T R Kiema
M. Lilja
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Hypertens. 1996 Oct;14(10):1183-7
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arteriosclerosis - enzymology - genetics
Carotid Artery Diseases - enzymology - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Variations in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene have been implicated in cardiovascular pathology. Therefore, the association between the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery and the insertion/ deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene was investigated. SUBJECTS: Three hundred men and 300 women were selected randomly from the middle-aged population living in the town Oulu, Finland, of whom 515 subjects (85.8%) participated. METHODS: The IMT of the carotid arteries was determined by bilateral B-mode ultrasonography. IMT values were adjusted for gender, age, height, plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, smoking and systolic blood pressure. The I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene was determined by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Among non-smokers, the subjects with the DD genotype had significantly higher carotid IMT than did those with II or ID. The association was found also in combined IMT plaque values. In the total population the association was weaker and it was absent in current smokers. Genotype could explain 1.3-2.7% of the variance of carotid IMT in non-smokers. No association between the amount or size of carotid plaques and genotype was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Variations at the ACE gene locus contribute to the degree of the early changes in carotid atherosclerosis in the population. The gene effect is, however, masked by stronger effects of environmental factors such as smoking. The lack of association between atherosclerotic plaques and genotypes may reflect different mechanisms being involved in plaque development and early arterial wall thickening.
PubMed ID
8906516 View in PubMed
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Cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphisms are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10550
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2000 Jan;30(1):18-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
S. Kakko
M. Tamminen
M. Päivänsalo
H. Kauma
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
M J Savolainen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. sakari.kakko@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2000 Jan;30(1):18-25
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Carotid Artery Diseases - genetics
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Female
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tunica Intima - pathology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is involved in the reverse cholesterol transport and is therefore a candidate gene for atherosclerosis. DESIGN: The prevalences of the I405V and the R451Q polymorphisms were studied in a population sample of 515 men and women. Genotypes were determined by PCR and carotid atherosclerosis by ultrasonography as the mean intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid arteries. RESULTS: The Q451 allele was associated with significantly lower intima media thickness in men (P = 0.001). The Q451 allele was, in our earlier study, associated with high plasma CETP activity in men. The VV405 genotype was associated with lower plasma CETP activity compared with the II405 genotype (P
PubMed ID
10619997 View in PubMed
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Dietary and other non-pharmacological treatments in patients with drug-treated hypertension and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10480
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Mar;247(3):318-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M L Silaste
R. Junes
A O Rantala
H. Kauma
M. Lilja
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and the Biocentre Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. Marja-Leena.Silaste@oulu.fi
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Mar;247(3):318-24
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - diet therapy - drug therapy - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the nutrient intakes and other lifestyle patterns of drug-treated hypertensives and control subjects. DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based epidemiological study. SETTING: The participating study subjects visited the research laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine of the University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1045 Finnish men and women aged 40-60 years, of whom 716 (69%) completed 7-day food records. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Intakes of energy, protein, total fat, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrate, alcohol, fibre, calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium were assessed from 7-day food records. The study also included measurements of blood pressure, blood glucose and plasma lipids, and anthropometric variables. Information about alcohol consumption, smoking habits and physical activity was collected by interviewing. RESULTS: Obesity was common amongst the hypertensive subjects, whose body mass indices were significantly higher than those of the control subjects. Only minor differences existed in the energy intake levels and nutrient intakes of the hypertensive and control cohorts, but the control subjects performed more physical activity than the hypertensive subjects. The dietary recommendations concerning the intakes of total and saturated fats, carbohydrate and fibre were poorly met by both the hypertensive and the control subjects. Alcohol consumption was high amongst the hypertensive men, especially amongst the smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Non-pharmacological treatment, including dietary management, of hypertensive patients at high risk for cardiovascular complications seems still to be inadequate. Additional well-focused efforts are needed to intensify the dietary treatment as well as to reduce alcohol consumption and smoking amongst hypertensives.
PubMed ID
10762447 View in PubMed
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Effect of hypertension and risk factors on diameters of abdominal aorta and common iliac and femoral arteries in middle-aged hypertensive and control subjects: a cross-sectional systematic study with duplex ultrasound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52966
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2000 Nov;153(1):99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
M J Päivänsalo
J. Merikanto
T. Jerkkola
M J Savolainen
A O Rantala
H. Kauma
M. Lilja
A. Reunanen Y
A. Kesäniemi
I. Suramo
Author Affiliation
Departments of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Oulu, FIN-90220, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2000 Nov;153(1):99-106
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Arteriosclerosis - complications - ultrasonography
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Femoral Artery - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Iliac Artery - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Abstract
There is a general tendency towards atherosclerosis and arterial dilatation in older age, and high blood pressure also tends to increase arterial diameters. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors on aortic, common iliac and common femoral artery diameters. The diameters of the abdominal aorta and the iliac and femoral arteries and the extent of echogenic plaques in the aorta and the iliac arteries down to groin level were evaluated with ultrasound in 1007 middle-aged (40-60 years) men (505) and women (502), 496 with arterial hypertension and 511 controls. Twenty-eight subjects were excluded because of poor visualization. Men had significantly larger diameters of the abdominal aorta (mean 21.3+/-2.8 vs. 17.8+/-1.3 mm) and the common iliac (13.4+/-2.0 vs. 12.2+/-1.2) and common femoral arteries (11.0+/-1.4 vs. 9.7+/-0.9) than women (P for all
PubMed ID
11058704 View in PubMed
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Effect of hypertension, diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors on kidney size in middle-aged adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10809
Source
Clin Nephrol. 1998 Sep;50(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
M J Päivänsalo
J. Merikanto
M J Savolainen
M. Lilja
A O Rantala
H. Kauma
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
I. Suramo
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 1998 Sep;50(3):161-8
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - pathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - pathology - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - pathology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Hypertension - pathology - ultrasonography
Kidney - pathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Organ Size
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate in a population-based series (1031 subjects, age range 40-60 years) whether the renal size of hypertensive subjects differs from that of control subjects and whether the difference might be due to hypertension itself or risk factors associated with hypertension. The renal measurements were performed by abdominal ultrasound. The genders were analyzed separately. Hypertensive men had slightly larger kidneys than controls (70.1+/-8.9 cm2 vs. 67.9+/-8.7 cm2, p
PubMed ID
9776419 View in PubMed
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Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10387
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):230-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
H. Kauma
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Kajaanintie 50 FIN-90220, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):230-8
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Pressure Determination
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - enzymology
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - enzymology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Syndrome
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood - metabolism
von Willebrand Factor - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the associations between serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity (GTP) and the components of the metabolic syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational study of hypertensive patients and controls. SETTING: The participating subjects visited the research laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1045 Caucasians, 40-59 years of age, consisting of 261 drug-treated hypertensive men, 258 drug-treated hypertensive women and 526 age- and sex-matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The associations between GTP and the cardiovascular risk factors were analysed through multiple regression and logistic methods and by GTP tertiles. The independent effect of GTP on different insulin measures, calculated from the values of 2 h of oral glucose tolerance test, was estimated after concurrent adjustment for age, obesity and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: GTP correlated highly significantly with the components of the metabolic syndrome. The correlation coefficient were 0.33 between GTP and body mass index, 0. 25 between GTP and systolic blood pressure in control men (P = 0. 0001), 0.39 between GTP and triglycerides, and 0.32 between GTP and fasting insulin in hypertensive women (P = 0.0001). The association between GTP and blood pressure remained significant only at upright measurements in controls. All insulin measures had a significant positive association with increasing GTP tertiles in all the study groups (e.g. fasting insulin 8.1 mU L-1 in the lowest and 11.0 mU L-1in the highest tertile in control women, P = 0.0001), with the exception of fasting insulin in control men. In a pooled logistic analysis after adjustment for age, body mass index, alcohol consumption and gender, the independent predictors of the metabolic syndrome were body mass index, uric acid, total cholesterol and GTP (for log-transformed GTP odds ratio 4.0, 95% CI: 2.80-5.69). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant associations between GTP and the components of the metabolic syndrome. Elevated levels of GTP may not always indicate increased alcohol consumption, but may also suggest the existence of the metabolic syndrome with its subsequent deleterious consequences.
PubMed ID
10971790 View in PubMed
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Heart rate variability in systemic hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75076
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 May 15;77(12):1073-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1996
Author
H V Huikuri
A. Ylitalo
S M Pikkujämsä
M J Ikäheimo
K E Airaksinen
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 May 15;77(12):1073-7
Date
May-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Echocardiography
Health Behavior
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Posture - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Low heart rate (HR) variability is a risk factor for cardiac mortality in various patient populations, but it has not been well established whether patients with long-standing hypertension have abnormalities in the autonomic modulation of HR. Time and frequency domain measures of HR variability were compared in randomly selected, age-matched populations of 188 normotensive and 168 hypertensive males (mean age 50 +/- 6 years for both). The standard deviation of the RR intervals was lower in the hypertensive subjects than in the normotensive ones (52 +/- 19 vs 59 +/- 20 mss; p
PubMed ID
8644660 View in PubMed
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Hyperinsulinemia and carotid atherosclerosis in hypertensive and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67577
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 Jul;21(7):1188-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
A O Rantala
M. Päivänsalo
H. Kauma
M. Lilja
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 Jul;21(7):1188-93
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arteriosclerosis - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body constitution
Carotid Artery Diseases - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Case-Control Studies
Diastole
Fasting
Female
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - complications - physiopathology
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - complications - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Systole
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationships between carotid atherosclerosis measured as intima-media thickness (IMT) and different measures of insulin in a population-based case-control study of men and women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Carotid ultrasonographic measurements and 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in a random sample of 513 hypertensive subjects, aged 40-59 years, and in 518 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The associations between IMT and the different measures of insulin were analyzed through multiple regression and by insulin quintiles. The independent effect of insulin was estimated after concurrent adjustment for age, obesity, LDL cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS: The most powerful correlates with IMT were LDL cholesterol, age, systolic blood pressure, pack-years of smoking, and of the different insulin parameters, 2-h post-load insulin. In stepwise regression analysis, the independent predictors of the mean IMT were LDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, pack-years of smoking, and age (P
PubMed ID
9653618 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in drug-treated hypertensive patients and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10718
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Feb;245(2):163-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A O Rantala
H. Kauma
M. Lilja
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Feb;245(2):163-74
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - epidemiology
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - blood - drug therapy - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Syndrome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of the metabolic abnormalities associated with hypertension and to define the predictors of the metabolic syndrome by different definitions in random population-based samples. DESIGN: A cross-sectional epidemiological study of hypertensive patients and controls. SETTING: The participating study subjects visited the research laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. SUBJECTS: Six hundred treated male and female hypertensives aged 40-59 years and 600 age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected by age stratification from population registers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A wide range of laboratory analyses were conducted. After fasting blood had been drawn, the subjects were given a 75 g glucose load except previously known insulin-treated diabetics. Both 1 h and 2 h glucose and insulin concentrations were determined. During the same visit, a standardized health questionnaire covering the past medical history, current and former medication use, physical activity, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and family history was completed. Ten different definitions of the metabolic syndrome were applied to achieve a wide perspective of the prevalence of the different combinations. RESULTS: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in different samples varied depending on the definition from 0.8 to 35.3%, being lowest in the control men and women and highest in the hypertensive men. Three-quarters of a random, middle-aged, urban population show at least one cardiovascular risk factor and 91.3% of all the hypertensive subjects show at least one cardiovascular risk factor in addition to hypertension itself. The independent predictors of the metabolic syndrome were waist circumference, uric acid, total cholesterol and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in logistic analysis after adjustment for age, measure of obesity and gender. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional, epidemiological study shows that the magnitude of the prevalence rates of the metabolic syndrome is at the same level in various populations, being less than one-third in population-based samples in spite of the different definitions. The cluster of several cardiovascular risk factors, especially in the hypertensives, leads to an increased relative risk of cardiovascular diseases.
PubMed ID
10081519 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.