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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and risk of angina pectoris: analysis in Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53502
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):539-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A. Hubinette
S. Cnattingius
A L V Johansson
C. Henriksson
P. Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.hubinette@mep.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):539-44
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Intrauterine nutrition approximated by birth weight has been shown to be inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). By investigating the association within twin pairs discordant for disease, the influence of genetic and early environmental factors is substantially reduced. METHODS: We have investigated the association between birth weight and angina pectoris in same-sexed twins with known zygosity included in the population-based Swedish Twin Registry. Self-reports of birth weight and angina pectoris were collected in a telephone interview between 1998 and 2000. The cohort analyses were based on 4594 same-sexed twins, and the within-pair analyses included 55 dizygotic and 37 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for angina pectoris. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared with birth weight between 2.0 and 2.9 kg, low birth weight (
PubMed ID
12908719 View in PubMed
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Helicobacter pylori status in family members as risk factors for infection in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29571
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Aug;133(4):645-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
M. Kivi
A L V Johansson
M. Reilly
Y. Tindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Aug;133(4):645-52
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Transmission, Horizontal - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Helicobacter Infections - blood - epidemiology - transmission
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study aimed to disentangle the independent contributions of Helicobacter pylori infections in mothers, fathers and siblings to the risk for the infection in the 11-13 years age group. Index children from a cross-sectional Stockholm school survey and their family members completed questionnaires and contributed blood samples. H. pylori serostatus was determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot. Fifty-four seropositive and 108 seronegative index children were included and 480 out of 548 family members contributed blood. In multivariate logistic regression modelling, having an infected mother (OR 11.6, 95% CI 2.0-67.9) or at least one infected sibling (OR 8.1, 95% CI 1.8-37.3) were risk factors for index child infection, whilst the influence of infected fathers was non-significant. Birth in high-prevalence countries was an independent risk factor (OR 10.4, 95% CI 3.4-31.3). H. pylori infections in mothers and siblings and birth in high-prevalence countries stand out as strong markers of infection risk amongst children in Sweden.
PubMed ID
16050509 View in PubMed
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Influence of hysterectomy on fistula formation in women with diverticulitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146489
Source
Br J Surg. 2010 Feb;97(2):251-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
D. Altman
C. Forsgren
F. Hjern
C. Lundholm
S. Cnattingius
A L V Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. daniel.altman@ki.se
Source
Br J Surg. 2010 Feb;97(2):251-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Diverticulitis - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Fistula - epidemiology - etiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Intestinal Fistula - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Fistula - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Fistula - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
: Diverticulitis is a risk factor for fistula formation but little is known about the influence of hysterectomy in this association. A population-based nationwide matched cohort study was performed to determine the risk of fistula formation in hysterectomized women with, and without, diverticulitis.
: Women who had a hysterectomy between 1973 and 2003, and a matched control cohort, were identified from the Swedish Inpatient Register. Incidence of diverticulitis and fistula surgery was determined by cross-linkage to the Register, and risk was estimated using a Cox regression model.
: In a cohort of 168 563 hysterectomized and 614 682 non-hysterectomized women (mean follow-up 11.0 and 11.5 years respectively), there were 14 051 cases of diverticulitis and 851 fistulas. Compared with women who had neither hysterectomy nor diverticulitis, the risk of fistula surgery increased fourfold in hysterectomized women without diverticulitis (hazard ratio (HR) 4.0 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 3.5 to 4.7)), sevenfold in non-hysterectomized women with diverticulitis (HR 7.6 (4.8 to 12.1)) and 25-fold in hysterectomized women with diverticulitis (HR 25.2 (15.5 to 41.2)).
: Diverticulitis, and to a lesser extent hysterectomy, is strongly associated with the risk of fistula formation. Hysterectomized women with diverticulitis have the highest risk of developing surgically managed fistula.
PubMed ID
20035535 View in PubMed
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Serum calcium and the risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151454
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Sep;20(7):1205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
C. Halthur
A L V Johansson
M. Almquist
J. Malm
H. Grönberg
J. Manjer
P W Dickman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. cat.halthur@ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Sep;20(7):1205-14
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Calcium - blood
Demography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested an association between high dietary intake of calcium and the risk of prostate cancer. Calcium-rich diet has been suggested to affect the serum levels of Vitamin D, and thereby promote cancer. We conducted the largest study of the association between prediagnostic serum levels of calcium and the risk of prostate cancer.
We examined the incidence of prostate cancer in relation to prediagnostic serum calcium levels in a prospective cohort study of 22,391 healthy Swedish men, of which 1,539 incident cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed during the 30 years of follow-up until December 2006.
Serum levels of calcium were measured at baseline, and categorized into quartiles. Cox regression was used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
We found no evidence of an association between prediagnostic serum levels of calcium and risk of prostate cancer (HR for trend = 0.99 [95% CI;0.94-1.03]). However, a moderate significant negative association was seen in men with a BMI above 25 and aged below 45 years at baseline (Highest vs. lowest quartile, HR = 0.63 [95% CI;0.40-0.99]).
These data do not support the hypothesis that high serum calcium levels is a risk factor for prostate cancer. On the contrary, the data suggest that high serum levels of calcium in young overweight men may be a marker for a decreased risk of developing prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
19377857 View in PubMed
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Time-dependent risk of developing distant metastasis in breast cancer patients according to treatment, age and tumour characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105248
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Mar 4;110(5):1378-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2014
Author
E. Colzani
A L V Johansson
A. Liljegren
T. Foukakis
M. Clements
J. Adolfsson
P. Hall
K. Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Mar 4;110(5):1378-84
Date
Mar-4-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - diagnosis - pathology
Risk
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Metastatic breast cancer is a severe condition without curative treatment. How relative and absolute risk of distant metastasis varies over time since diagnosis, as a function of treatment, age and tumour characteristics, has not been studied in detail.
A total of 9514 women under the age of 75 when diagnosed with breast cancer in Stockholm and Gotland regions during 1990-2006 were followed up for metastasis (mean follow-up=5.7 years). Time-dependent development of distant metastasis was analysed using flexible parametric survival models and presented as hazard ratio (HR) and cumulative risk.
A total of 995 (10.4%) patients developed distant metastasis; the most common sites were skeleton (32.5%) and multiple sites (28.3%). Women younger than 50 years at diagnosis, with lymph node-positive, oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, >20 mm tumours and treated only locally, had the highest risk of distant metastasis (0-5 years' cumulative risk =0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.47-0.64). Women older than 50 years at diagnosis, with ER-positive, lymph node-negative and =20-mm tumours, had the same and lowest cumulative risk of developing metastasis 0-5 and 5-10 years (cumulative risk=0.03; 95% CI: 0.02-0.04). In the period of 5-10 years after diagnosis, women with ER-positive, lymph node-positive and >20-mm tumours were at highest risk of distant recurrence. Women with ER-negative tumours showed a decline in risk during this period.
Our data show no support for discontinuation at 5 years of clinical follow-up in breast cancer patients and suggest further investigation on differential clinical follow-up for different subgroups of patients.
PubMed ID
24434426 View in PubMed
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What is the impact of chronic systemic inflammation such as rheumatoid arthritis on mortality following cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275823
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2016 May;75(5):862-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
J F Simard
S. Ekberg
A L V Johansson
J. Askling
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2016 May;75(5):862-6
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - mortality
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality - pathology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Emerging evidence links inflammation and immune competence to cancer progression and outcome. Few studies addressing cancer survival in the context of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have reported reduced survival without accounting for the underlying mortality risk in RA. Whether this increased mortality is a cancer-specific phenomenon, an effect of the decreased lifespan in RA or a combination of both remains unknown.
Using Swedish register data (2001-2009), we performed a cohort study of individuals with RA (N=34 930), matched to general population comparators (N=169 740), incident cancers (N=12 676) and deaths (N=14 291). Using stratified Cox models, we estimated HRs of death associated with RA in the presence and absence of cancer, by stage and time since cancer diagnosis, for all cancers and specific sites.
In the absence of cancer, RA was associated with a doubled mortality rate (HR=2.1, 95% CI 2.0 to 2.2). In the presence of cancer, the relative effect of RA on mortality was varied by stage. For cancer (tumour, node, metastases) stages I and II at diagnosis, the relative effect of RA on mortality was the same as in the absence of cancer. For cancers diagnosed at advanced stages with absolute higher mortality, the effect decreased (HR=1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.3). These associations remained across time since cancer diagnosis and were reasonably similar across cancer sites.
Much of the increase in mortality in patients with RA diagnosed with cancer seems to reside with effects of RA independently of the cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2015 Sep;11(9):507-926122950
PubMed ID
25948597 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.