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[Angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction in patients transferred from other hospitals]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53833
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 20;121(25):2933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2001
Author
A K Andreassen
A. Nanbjør
K. Endresen
J. Offstad
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedisinsk avdeling Rikshospitalet 0027 Oslo. arne.andreassen@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 20;121(25):2933-7
Date
Oct-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Norway
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Primary or rescue angioplasty are reperfusion modalities in selected patients with acute myocardial infarction, after initial diagnosis in local hospitals. We sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of transporting patients to a tertiary care hospital for interventional treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1999 and April 2000, 50 consecutive patients were included in this prospective observational study. Comparisons were performed between patients admitted to primary angioplasty, either directly (n = 20; group A) or from other hospitals (n = 14; group B), and those transferred for rescue angioplasty (n = 16; group C). RESULTS: No severe complications occurred during interhospital transport. Median time interval from onset of symptoms to hospitalization was comparable between groups. Median time interval from onset of symptoms to balloon inflation in group C (340 minutes) was significantly longer than in groups A and B (181 and 130 minutes). All patients were alive at follow-up after median 230 days. Median echocardiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction in group A was non-significantly higher (50%) than in groups B and C (43% and 46%). INTERPRETATION: Acute transfer for primary or rescue angioplasty is feasible and safe for selected patients with acute myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
11715776 View in PubMed
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Distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks and prevalence of tick-borne encephalitis virus among questing ticks in the Arctic Circle region of northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292091
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2018 01; 9(1):97-103
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
A Soleng
K S Edgar
K M Paulsen
B N Pedersen
Y B Okbaldet
I E B Skjetne
D Gurung
R Vikse
Å K Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division for Infection Control and Environmental Health, Department of Pest Control, PO-Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.soleng@fhi.no.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2018 01; 9(1):97-103
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - physiology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - parasitology
Female
Ixodes - growth & development - physiology - virology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nymph - virology
Prevalence
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Abstract
This study investigated the geographical distribution of Ixodes ricinus and prevalence of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in northern Norway. Flagging for questing I. ricinus ticks was performed in areas ranging from Vikna in Nord-Trøndelag County, located 190km south of the Arctic Circle (66.3°N), to Steigen in Nordland County, located 155km north of the Arctic Circle. We found that ticks were abundant in both Vikna (64.5°N) and Brønnøy (65.1°N). Only a few ticks were found at locations?~66°N, and no ticks were found at several locations up to 67.5°N. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of the collected ticks (nymphs and adults) for the presence of TBEV revealed a low prevalence (0.1%) of TBEV among the nymphs collected in Vikna, while a prevalence of 0% to 3% was found among nymphs collected at five locations in Brønnøy. Adult ticks collected in Vikna and Brønnøy had higher rates of TBEV infection (8.6% and 0%-9.0%, respectively) than the nymphs. No evidence of TBEV was found in the few ticks collected further north of Brønnøy. This is the first report of TBEV being detected at locations up to 65.1°N. It remains to be verified whether viable populations of I. ricinus exist at locations north of 66°N. Future studies are warranted to increase our knowledge concerning tick distribution, tick abundance, and tick-borne pathogens in northern Norway.
PubMed ID
29030314 View in PubMed
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Distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks and prevalence of tick-borne encephalitis virus among questing ticks in the Arctic Circle region of northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286496
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 Oct 08;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-08-2017
Author
A. Soleng
K S Edgar
K M Paulsen
B N Pedersen
Y B Okbaldet
I E B Skjetne
D. Gurung
R. Vikse
Å K Andreassen
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 Oct 08;
Date
Oct-08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study investigated the geographical distribution of Ixodes ricinus and prevalence of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in northern Norway. Flagging for questing I. ricinus ticks was performed in areas ranging from Vikna in Nord-Trøndelag County, located 190km south of the Arctic Circle (66.3°N), to Steigen in Nordland County, located 155km north of the Arctic Circle. We found that ticks were abundant in both Vikna (64.5°N) and Brønnøy (65.1°N). Only a few ticks were found at locations?~66°N, and no ticks were found at several locations up to 67.5°N. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of the collected ticks (nymphs and adults) for the presence of TBEV revealed a low prevalence (0.1%) of TBEV among the nymphs collected in Vikna, while a prevalence of 0% to 3% was found among nymphs collected at five locations in Brønnøy. Adult ticks collected in Vikna and Brønnøy had higher rates of TBEV infection (8.6% and 0%-9.0%, respectively) than the nymphs. No evidence of TBEV was found in the few ticks collected further north of Brønnøy. This is the first report of TBEV being detected at locations up to 65.1°N. It remains to be verified whether viable populations of I. ricinus exist at locations north of 66°N. Future studies are warranted to increase our knowledge concerning tick distribution, tick abundance, and tick-borne pathogens in northern Norway.
PubMed ID
29030314 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3447-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
S. Simonsen
A K Andreassen
L. Gullestad
H. Lindberg
E. Seem
O R Geiran
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedisinsk avdeling, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3447-50
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Rejection
Heart Transplantation - contraindications - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Selection
Abstract
The first heart transplantation in the Nordic countries was performed at Rikshospitalet, Oslo in 1983. In this paper, we present our experience with this treatment up to 1999. 317 heart transplantations have been performed, an average of 23 transplantations per year. 82% of the recipients were males; 50% had heart failure due to coronary heart disease. Mean age of the recipients was 47 years (range 1-64). Our indications and contraindications are similar to most other transplantation centres. Triple immunosuppression with ciclosporin, prednisolone and azathioprine have been used as standard treatment. The survival rate after one and ten years are 85% and 53% respectively, with a significantly higher survival rate among recipients younger than 50 at transplantation, especially if the graft was from a donor younger than 35 years. The most common early postoperative complications were acute cellular rejections and infections. Transplant accelerated coronary heart disease and cancer were the main causes of late death. We believe that close co-operation between Riskshospitalet and local centres will provide the best treatment for patients needing a heart transplant.
PubMed ID
10553344 View in PubMed
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[Thrombolytic treatment in acute myocardial infarction. Choice of preparations in Norwegian hospitals]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54372
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jun 30;118(17):2630-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1998
Author
A K Andreassen
L. Gullestad
K. Endresen
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling B, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jun 30;118(17):2630-1
Date
Jun-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital
English Abstract
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Streptokinase - administration & dosage
Thrombolytic Therapy
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - administration & dosage
Abstract
In 1994 Statens legemiddelkontroll recommended Norwegian hospitals to increase the use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) in thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Using a questionnaire, which was distributed to all medical departments in Norwegian hospitals, we examined and assessed the preference of thrombolytic agents. None of the coronary care units administered r-tPA routinely as their first choice. Of 59 hospitals involved, 35 (59%) considered r-tPA on a wider indication (i.e. young age, short history of symptoms, and anterior wall infarction) than the 24 (41%) that only used r-tPA when streptokinase had recently been given. Of a total of 11,191 cases of myocardial infarction in 1996, 628 (6%) were treated with r-tPA. Closer examination of 2,818 cases of myocardial infarction in 13 hospitals revealed that thrombolytic treatment was given in 1,016 (36%) instances. In 206 cases (20%), the chosen agent was r-tPA, whereas 810 (80%) were given streptokinase. The reasons for the preference of streptokinase to r-tPA are discussed.
PubMed ID
9673511 View in PubMed
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