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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of self-reported weights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74374
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Aug;34(8):1593-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
A J Stunkard
J M Albaum
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Aug;34(8):1593-9
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
United States
Abstract
The accuracy of self-reported weights was assessed by comparing reported weights with measured weights of 1302 subjects at eight different medical and nonmedical sites across two countries (United States and Denmark), across ages, sexes, and different purposes for the weight measurements. Self-reported weights were remarkably accurate across all these variables in the American sample, even among obese people, and may obviate the need for measured weights in epidemiological investigations. Danish reports were somewhat less accurate, particularly among women over 40 yr of age.
PubMed ID
7270483 View in PubMed
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Adoption study of environmental modifications of the genetic influences on obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67592
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Jan;22(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
T I Sørensen
C. Holst
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. tias-ipm@inet.uni-c.dk
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Jan;22(1):73-81
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Comparative Study
Denmark
Environment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adult body mass index (BMI weight (kg)/height2 (m2)) usually shows familial correlations below 0.3, which are almost entirely due to genetic influences. The considerable remaining non-familial individual variation may be due to non-shared environmental influences which, however, may interact with or modify the genetic influence. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic influence on adult BMI is modified by various obesity-related environmental conditions during childhood and adulthood. DESIGN: Adoption study, in which the genetic influence is assessed by the correlations in adult BMI between adoptees and their biological fathers, mothers and full siblings. These correlations were compared between groups of families characterized by differences in rearing or adult environment of the adoptees and/or their biological relatives. SUBJECTS: Height, current weight and greatest weight ever, were obtained in 3651 subjects, who were adopted by non-related families in Copenhagen between 1924 and 1947. Groups representing thin, medium weight, overweight and obese proband adoptees were selected by current BMI (n = 540) and by maximum BMI (n = 524). The members of the biological and adoptive families of the proband adoptees were identified and their BMI was computed from height and weight obtained by mailed questionnaires. MAIN VARIABLES: Indicators related to the rearing environment of the adoptees were age of the adoptee at transfer to the adoptive family, region of residence, presence of adoptive siblings and, for the adoptive parents, year of birth, age at time of adoption, occupational rating, smoking habits and BMI. Indicators of the environment of both the adoptee and the biological relatives were: year of birth; occupational rating and smoking habits, and, of the environment of the biological parents, age and parity at birth of the adoptee. RESULTS: The correlations in BMI between adoptees and the biological fathers, mothers and siblings were 0.11, 0.15 and 0.26 for adoptees selected by current BMI, and 0.13, 0.16, and 0.27 for adoptees selected by maximum BMI, respectively (all P
PubMed ID
9481603 View in PubMed
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Source
N Engl J Med. 1986 Jan 23;314(4):193-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-23-1986
Author
A J Stunkard
T I Sørensen
C. Hanis
T W Teasdale
R. Chakraborty
W J Schull
F. Schulsinger
Source
N Engl J Med. 1986 Jan 23;314(4):193-8
Date
Jan-23-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Body Weight
Denmark
Environment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - genetics - prevention & control
Abstract
We examined the contributions of genetic factors and the family environment to human fatness in a sample of 540 adult Danish adoptees who were selected from a population of 3580 and divided into four weight classes: thin, median weight, overweight, and obese. There was a strong relation between the weight class of the adoptees and the body-mass index of their biologic parents - for the mothers, P less than 0.0001; for the fathers, P less than 0.02. There was no relation between the weight class of the adoptees and the body-mass index of their adoptive parents. Cumulative distributions of the body-mass index of parents showed similar results; there was a strong relation between the body-mass index of biologic parents and adoptee weight class and no relation between the index of adoptive parents and adoptee weight class. Furthermore, the relation between biologic parents and adoptees was not confined to the obesity weight class, but was present across the whole range of body fatness - from very thin to very fat. We conclude that genetic influences have an important role in determining human fatness in adults, whereas the family environment alone has no apparent effect.
PubMed ID
3941707 View in PubMed
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Component distributions of body mass index defining moderate and extreme overweight in Danish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230517
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jul;130(1):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
R A Price
T I Sørensen
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jul;130(1):193-201
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Skewness in the distribution of body mass index in a population of Danish men (n = 1,589) and women (n = 1,988) adopted in Copenhagen between 1923 and 1947 can be explained by mixture of three component distributions, after removing age and sex effects. Even when residual skewness was allowed for in component distributions, similar results were obtained. The upper component distributions corresponded to extreme overweight in both women and men. The results indicate that while there are differences in the means and ranges of body mass index in men and women, the component distributions are similar. Both genetic and environmental factors can produce such component distributions. The authors speculate that the underlying predisposition to obesity is distributed similarly in women and men. Finally, on the basis of the component distributions, the authors propose thresholds of body mass index which allow for 85-98 per cent separation of moderate and extreme overweight groups in men and women.
PubMed ID
2787108 View in PubMed
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Intelligence and educational level in relation to body mass index of adult males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224386
Source
Hum Biol. 1992 Feb;64(1):99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
T W Teasdale
T I Sørensen
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Center for Rehabilitation of Brain Damage, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Hum Biol. 1992 Feb;64(1):99-106
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Regression Analysis
Abstract
In this study we explore the relationships between intelligence test score, educational level, and degree of body fatness. We collected data on intelligence test score, educational level, height, and weight from a sample of 26,274 young Danish men and computed body mass index (weight/height2) as a measure of fatness. Both intelligence test score and educational level had maximum values below the median for body mass index and declined monotonically thereafter. The decline was equal for test score and educational level and above 32 kg/m2 corresponded to almost half a standard deviation. These results are not readily explained by stigmatization of frank obesity, and other mechanisms, possibly genetic, may be responsible.
PubMed ID
1582652 View in PubMed
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Use of the Danish Adoption Register for the study of obesity and thinness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242384
Source
Res Publ Assoc Res Nerv Ment Dis. 1983;60:115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

7 records – page 1 of 1.